HouseJob Chronicles: An Internal Medicine Resident’s Profile

My passion keeps me going. I remind myself that I signed up for this business of saving lives and that things will not always be bad. For every patient we lose, many more are saved.

– Dr. Dennis Palma

Q1. Why Internal Medicine?

Dr. Palma: Well, it started with my medical school experience. Internal Medicine was my first posting. I admired the team work among the doctors. I also liked the way they applied their knowledge to make the correct diagnosis.

In my work as a medical officer, following my service year (NYSC), I found the motivation from my senior colleagues very helpful.
Although O and G was also a specialty of interest, I signed up for Internal Medicine as soon as there was a reaidency opening.

Q2. What does a fulfilled day look like for you?

Dr. Palma: A fulfilled day for me, means that I have contributed immensely to patient care, especially those in life threatening conditions.


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Q3. What keeps you going on tough days?

Dr. Palma: My passion keeps me going. I remind myself that I signed up for this business of saving lives and that things will not always be bad. For every patient we lose, many more are saved.

Q4. Do you have a favorite mantra? Please share. 

Dr. Palma: If you wait for things to happen nothing will happen.” You have to be proactive in life to get anything you want.


Q5. What’s the most life-changing lesson you’ve learnt as a doctor?

Dr. Palma: Several. A particular lesson that comes to mind is to show more empathy towards patients and their relatives.
When my dad passed on at a teaching hospital some years back, I was able to understand how patient’s relatives are treated, the physical and psychological stress, the impolite and condescending attitude from health workers, and the enormous financial implications of healthcare.


Q6. If not medicine, what?

Dr. Palma: I wanted to be a medical doctor from childhood.
At some point in secondary school, I considered Engineering because most of my classmates wanted either Medicine or Engineering but becoming a doctor was a dream come true.

Q7. What are your favorite activities outside work?

Dr. Palma: I enjoy watching football and hanging out with friends. I also enjoy movies and reading novels.


http://www.eunicesmiles.wordpress.com


Q8. How do you keep your work-life balance?

Dr. Palma: There is no balance at the moment. Work takes a large aspect of my time, even my weekends are not entirely free.

Still I try to keep in touch with a few friends outside the medical circle.

Q9. What are the attributes of a good doctor?

Dr Palma: A good doctor should have a good relationship with other members of the healthcare team. He should be humble because a lot of responsibility is demanded of him. A good doctor should be able to convert medical knowledge into practice and learn to show empathy towards patients.

Q10. What advice will you give to a Naija House Officer?

Dr. Palma: Learn all you can from your senior colleagues and show them respect. The more you know, the more outstanding you’ll be. It’s important to have a professional goal at the start of your career and work towards it. Show empathy towards patients. When all is said and done, it’s all about the patient. 

***

Dr. Dennis Palma, is a graduate of University of Maiduguri Medical School. He’s presently a Senior Resident at Federal Medical Centre, Lokoja, and is interested in Endocrinology.

Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::

❤️❤️❤️

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HouseJob Chronicles: A Surgery Resident’s Profile.

An interesting aspect of housejob for me, is getting to meet senior colleagues from various backgrounds, with unique personalities and a wide-range of interests in the medical field. 

As part of the HouseJob Chronicles series, I’ll be featuring some residents from my centre (FMCL) who will give insights about the expectations and demands of residency (in Nigeria).

Enjoy!
***

“A good doctor cares. He cares about his patients. He’s not necessarily the doctor with the greatest knowledge, [but] he is empathic and shows compassion.”

– Dr. Fola Aduloju.


Q1. Why Surgery?

Dr. Fola: I’ve always loved the idea and I’ve always been fascinated by it. I studied medicine because I wanted to be a surgeon. Apart from that, surgery is physically and mentally challenging and I loved that too. Also, surgery is very lucrative. I also like the fact that surgeons don’t rely on medications alone, they identify the problem and take it out or fix it. Even the best of surgeons would need the services of another surgeon if he has a surgical problem… he won’t operate on himself, meaning that surgeons will always be sought after.
Lastly, I love the the theater environment.

Q2. What does a fulfilled day look like for you?

Dr. Fola: As a resident, a fulfilled day for me is one in which I have successfully balanced service rendering, academic activity, family life and rest. One hardly experiences a fulfilled day as a surgery resident. There always something that gives for another. This might be different for other residents though

A Surgery Resident’s Profile
Q3. What keeps you going on tough days?

Dr Fola: On tough days, I remind myself that this was the path I chose for myself and I won’t let temporary circumstances derail me. I keep my eyes on the prize and get going. “No pain, no gain.”

Q4. Do you have a favorite mantra? Please share.

Dr. Fola: No favorite mantra, sorry. Lol

Q5. What’s the most life-changing lesson you’ve learnt as a doctor?

Dr. Fola: Life is ephemeral and one must value every day and maximize it like it’s the last. 

There’s a thin line between life and death.

Q6. If not medicine, what?

Dr. Fola: Aviation. I would most definitely become a pilot. That was my first love before the idea of becoming a surgeon came.

Q7. What are your favorite activities outside work?

Dr. Fola: I love reading about music theory, drawing and painting, programming and foreign languages. Unfortunately most of these are time consuming and residency won’t permit. So instead, I just watch TV and sleep when I have the chance.

Q8. How do you keep your “work-life” balance?

Dr. Fola: It’s difficult in surgery. The demands are enormous and time consuming. A surgery resident would always be skewed towards work. When there is opportunity, I hang out with friends and keep myself up to date with happenings.

A Surgery Resident’s Profile

Q9. What are the attributes of a good doctor?

Dr. Fola: A good doctor cares. He cares about his patients. He’s not necessarily the doctor with the greatest knowledge, [but] he is empathic and shows compassion. 

Of course, he hungers for knowledge to improve the quality of patient care.

Q10. What advice will you give to a Naija House Officer?

Dr. Fola: Naija House officers should know that the work environment is harsh and stressful. They should find ways of simplifying their tasks and reducing the stress. In other words, they should work smart.

Most importantly, they should consider getting licensed to practice in other places irrespective of their love to practice in Nigeria. This will give them more exposure and possibly better finance to have an independent and comfortable practice. There are things one does when one is younger, do them now. Lastly, they should go after skills acquisition and thirst after knowlege/self-improvement.

***

Dr. Fola Aduloju, is a graduate of University of Ilorin Medical School, and a Surgery Resident at Federal Medical Centre, Lokoja, Nigeria. He is interested in Neurosurgery specialty. 


Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::

    ❤️❤️❤️