10 Days In Abuja (Part 1)

Hello Fam,

Welcome back to my blog.

One of my goals this year was to go on a proper vacation within Nigeria. 

Like, girl…live a little and have some fun. 

While I was an international medical student, I had the opportunity to experience the culture and cuisine of a few other countries, and that opened up a whole new world for me. 

Since my return, I’ve looked forward to experiencing the rich historical and diverse cultural heritage of my home country, Nigeria. 

And somewhere on my mental bucket list, I plan to tour the length and breadth of Nigeria hopefully before I clock 60. So help me God. 

One of the places I was hoping to visit this year, was the Erinjesha waterfall, a popular tourist site in Osun state. 

Image: Erinjesha Waterfall

Somehow life happened and going for that trip was no longer a priority. Still I craved some sort of vacation for this year.

So when HRH suggested that I come over to Abuja – primarily to visit his folks – I jumped at the idea.

Thankfully, I got a leave-of-absence from my workplace and had the opportunity to go on this trip, the highlights of which I’ll be sharing in a 3-part series. 

You Can Also Read: 

– My Nigerian Passport And Four Countries

This is Lagos

Enjoy!

***

Abuja, is a beautiful city located right in the heart of the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) of Nigeria. 

According to Wikipedia.org, it is the eighth largest and one of the fastest growing cities in the world. 

A city known for its ambience and class, Abuja is definitely a must-see for any first-time visitor to Nigeria. 


5 Things You Should Know About Abuja:


1. Abuja is a well-planned city.

In the whole of Africa, Abuja is the only capital city that was built from ground up. Which means, the city didn’t just happen, it was engineered. 

The Federal Government of Nigeria, relocated the capital city from Lagos to Abuja in 1991, because of its central location and the ability to attract people from most of the ethnic groups in Nigeria.

Most of the buildings and road networks in Abuja, were carefully planned from the onset which makes life easier in every way imaginable. 

2. Abuja has a high cost of living. 

Compared to other major cities across Nigeria, the standard of living in the heart of Abuja is quite expensive, from the cost of renting an apartment, to transportation to feeding. 

No wonder it’s easily assumed that it’s only the rich who can afford to rich there.

Many low-income/middle-income earners prefer to stay around Abuja suburbs like Gwagalada, Nyanya and Kubwa.

3. Abuja is beautiful.

Dotted with many plazas, gardens, parks and skyscraper buildings, the city of Abuja is a real beauty that boasts of some of the best architectural designs in the country.

To the average Nigerian, Abuja city is like mini-abroad. Everywhere is fancy and sparkling.




4. Abuja is home to many cooperate organizations, religious bodies and government agencies. 

As the capital city, most of national institutions, have their head offices located in Abuja. 

There are also a few notable organizations like ECOWAS who have their headquarters in Abuja.

5. Abuja has a low-crime rate.

Abuja is said to be one of the safest cities in Nigeria, as the security measures around the city are generally more efficient. 

If you’re looking for a serene environment to raise a family in Nigeria, Abuja is definitely a place to consider. 

(Credits: connectnigeria.com, buzznigeria.com )

***

DAY 1: Trip to/Arrival in Abuja

Before my trip to Abuja, HRH and I discussed and made a well planned itinerary for the duration of my stay.

The initial plan was to travel by road (about 8 hours from Ibadan) but my mom would not have it. So she persuaded me to take a flight (and guess who paid for the fare?)

My flight was scheduled for 12:50 pm but for some reasons I did not get ready on time. 

Thankfully with my brother as my designated chauffeur, I still got to the airport in time. 

Although the last time I took a local flight was 2 years ago, I was able to check in without hassles.

My first irritation came as we were about to board. 

A rude airport official grabbed the bottle of water I’d just purchased from a shop in the waiting area from me.

Hian!!!

It made me really mad because there was an older woman also on the queue, who was holding a bottle of water and no one harassed her. 

That incident really pissed me off for the rest of the trip.

And just as I was entering the aircraft, a strong odor from the restroom greeted me, it was really disgusting. 

Arik Air can do better, please. 

Because I scheduled my trip during the festive season (a Muslim celebration), it appeared everyone and their kinsmen were traveling, so the aircraft was filled up.

Many of the families had small kids, and there was an especially fussy toddler whose tantrums were partly entertaining and partly a nuisance for the duration of the trip.

Our flight took off around 1:13 pm and we had a stopover of approximately 20 minutes at the Ilorin. 

We took off again some minutes after 2 pm and landed in Abuja just before 3 pm.

The rest of the trip was pleasant enough. 

#SophiaShotIt
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HRH was already at the airport awaiting my arrival and the first thing I did when I saw him was to rant about my ordeal during the trip.

You know na, some gists are best served hot.😉

Even as a returning visitor, I was still very impressed by the serene atmosphere I met on entering Abuja. 

#SophiaShotIt
The trip from the Airport to my sister’s house lasted over an hour but was it was quite stress free.

On getting to her house, HRH dropped me off. After putting away away my luggage, I spent the rest of my evening unwinding and looking forward to many days of adventure ahead. 
__

HRH: His Royal Highness. The Crown Prince of my heart.

Just so you know, this happened sometime in July. 😍🙈❤️

#SophiaShotIt



(To be continued)

PS: Unless otherwise indicated, all images are from the WEB.

:::requ1ne:::

     ❤️❤️❤️

A DAY IN THE LIFE || A NAIJA DOCTOR’S DIARY


*How my day started*

4:52 a.m. It’s too early, please go back to sleep.

5:17 a.m. No baby, still too early…go back to sleep. 

5:23 a.m. Sighs. Okay…you can get up now. Na work dey rush you. 

5:30 a.m. I’m already in the bathroom when my alarm rings.

After having my bath, I put some food on the gas cooker, then went back to bed to have my quiet time.

I had a quick breakfast of cereal (which will keep me till noon at least)

I also took an antibiotic thanks to a recurrent ear infection I’m battling with.


Then I packed some lunch because no satan is tempting me with stupid hunger at work today.



Finally stepped out of the house around 7:20 a.m. as I’m doing the 8 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. shift today.

***

7:35 a.m My pre-work glow.
Getting a few minutes of me-time.


8:15 a.m. Work has officially started but I’m yet to see my first patient which is very unusual

The first patient I saw was a toddler who had some episodes of vomiting and loose stool, and managed a case of enterocolitis with antibiotics and oral rehydration solution. 

The second patient was a newly diagnosed hypertensive who I spent a considerable amount of time counseling. 

*4 hours later*

12:25 pm It’s LUNCH TIME…yay!!!💃💃💃


1:45 p.m. After attending to a new admission on the ward, my energy level is like 30% . I don’t know where all the food I ate went o. Sighs.

2:00 pm Phew! Just saw my 12th patient for the day.

***

So I was called to see a patient in the Emergency room.

A little girl had a laceration inside her upper lip following a traumatic fall, thankfully the blood loss was minimal and her vitals were stable.


After cleaning out the area, I infiltrated with Xylocaine solution then sutured using vicryl 2.0.  

Though my surgical skills are pretty basic, I did a good job anyway. 



5:50 pm

I just finished reviewing a pregnant woman on the labor ward who is being induced. Every bone in my body feels tired. 

6:00 p.m.

Finally, my shift is over and I can officially take my leave. 💃💃💃

My extremely tired after-work look.😂😂😂

So here’s a list of all the cases I managed today:



***

Thank you for reading. Did you enjoy this blog?

:::requ1ne:::

     ❤️❤️❤️

Musings 1.7|| Naija!

A few minutes ago, I stepped out of the house to run an errand. 

It was close to midday and the sun was shining in its glory.

Still it took me a while to locate my destination.

Having been to that neighborhood a couple of times,

I was embarrassed to see business openings I was noticing for the first time.

More weird was that the AEDC outlet I visited, was being powered by a generator.

Naija, I hail thee!
:::requ1ne:::

*AEDC: Abuja Electricity Distribution Company

HouseJob Chronicles: 5 Ways NOT To Take Things Personal.

Hello People,

I had an experience at work the other day, interesting in retrospect, but very emotional for me at the time. I was hurt by some stuff one of my “Ogas at the top” said, and I ended in tears.

It was so embarrassing…long story short, I came out of the experience a better me.

In this post, I’d like to share a few tips with you about how NOT to take things personal as a House Officer, especially if you work (or plan to work) in Nigeria.

Enjoy!

***

1. Offenses will come.
Offenses are a part of life we all can’t do without. On a daily basis, we offend people and people offend us.

Unfortunately, even in the work-environment where everyone is expected to be cordial, people step on one another’s toes all the time.

As a House Officer, patients will annoy you, your colleagues will make you angry, and your seniors will frustrate you.

The way some patients view medical interns…🙄

Sadly, a lot of Nigerian doctors still see BULLYING as a necessary evil, and unless there’s a change in such mindset, House Officers will continue to be at the receiving end.

It’s in your own best interest to develop a thick skin against such scenarios, because they will surely come.

2. Keep Moving On.
No matter how bad a day seems, that day will pass.

Days will turn into weeks, weeks into months, and before you know it, your housejob experience is over.

If you want to survive as a House Officer unscathed, learn to move on quickly!

3. Be Considerate.
Eventually, what goes around comes around.

As a newbie doctor, maybe it’s time to change the narrative.

Be the difference you want to see.

To your patients show empathy. You have no idea what some of them are passing through.

To your colleagues show comradeship. You’re together in the struggle.

To your seniors show loyalty. They were once in your shoes.

It takes a little kindness to make a BIG difference.

In all, do your best and give the quality of care, treatment and respect you want others to give you.

4. Know your elastic limit.

When all is said and done, it is NOT every nonsense that you should allow.

I’m yet to walk out of a ward round, because God has REALLY helped me.

And I hope the day never comes because if it so happens…hehe

Like I say to anyone who cares to listen, I’m the only doctor in my family…I cannot come and die.

For your own sanity, speak up when you MUST.

If a colleague wants to take advantage of you, call such person to order.
If a patient tries to disrespect you, set him/her straight.
And if your seniors verbally or physically abuse you, to an extent that is unhealthy to your self-esteem, please report them to the appropriate quarters.

You’re a doctor, not a door-mat!

5. Laugh out Loud
When all is said and done, someone may just be having a bad day and looking for a channel to vent.

DO NOT become the scapegoat.

Try to to give your best at ALL times. Be timely. Be proactive. Don’t be lazy. Don’t be rude. Know your limits.

Refuse to be a casualty in another person’s mood instability.

And when you’ve done all you can, and someone still wants to make you angry or sad, just LAUGH OUT LOUD.

Image Credit: iStock
Laugh so hard that it confuses your “Tormentor.”

A little humor can really go a long way!

Remember, you’re STRONGER than you think.

Source: WEB

For me, whenever I start to feel overwhelmed by the sheer stress of the job, the Holyspirit gently reminds me that…

So I don’t complain, I give thanks.

***

I screen grabbed this from a friend’s status the other day. Truly this job Issa calling! 

Last, last, all of us will be ALRIGHT. 

….
Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::

    ❤️❤️❤️

OCTOBER|| C O U R A G E


It’s a few days into October already and all I can say is, God is good!

While meditating on what theme this month would be about, one word that stood out in my heart, was COURAGE. And I believe God was giving me a gentle reminder, that when everything else fails (my plans and what-not), I can look up to him and remain courageous.

Here are a few synonyms for the word COURAGE:
“bravery, pluckiness, valor, fearlessness, intrepidity, nerve, daring, audacity, boldness, grit, hardihood, heroism, gallantry”

And I’ll go with the first, BRAVERY

the admirable quality of being able to confront frightening things. It takes bravery for a knight to battle a dragon, but it also takes bravery for a shy child to walk into a new classroom.
(Vocabulary.com)

It’s little wonder that the song in my heart for this season just happens to be:

||WORSHIPYou make me brave (Amanda Cook)

And it’s one of my favorite songs ever! I remember having it on repeat for sometime last year.

||WORD– Lamentations 3:22-24 GNB

“The LORD ‘s unfailing love and mercy still continue, Fresh as the morning, as sure as the sunrise. The LORD is all I have, and so I put my hope in him.” 

I especially love the line that reads,

Fresh as the morning, as sure as the sunrise
. How reassuring that is! 

I still don’t know all God has in stock for me this season but I’m stepping out of the shadows of fear, discouragement and doubts and embracing his promises by faith.

And Amen to that!
***
In a nutshell, here’s what I’ve been upto:

|| My Ankara crafts and designs exhibition (As Promised)



My trainer, Niyot of Beracah House of Fashion, who is also a longtime friend did such a great job and I’m thankful for the opportunity to learn through her. Moving forward, I think I’ll be focusing on the Ankara book covers and see what designs I can come up with.

|| Still Learning

Spanish and Igbo!

|| Recent Reads:

Anthills of the Savannah (Chinua Achebe)
This was my first time reading any Chinua Achebe’s book. I’d attempted “There was a Country” earlier this year but found it difficult to continue with it. Not too long ago, I picked up this title, but I wasn’t enjoying the plot, so I dropped it. Eventually, one bored evening I summoned up courage and jumpstarted it (i.e. started reading right from the middle) and I was so intrigued that I read until the end. I found the book compelling, thought-provoking and with a melodramatic ending.

I heard that song before (Mary Higgins Clark)
I totally loved this book (although I’m sure I’ve read it before but totally forgot the plot), the writer kept me guessing until the very end. It had the right amount of suspense that kept me glued till the last page. If you’re a fan of mystery/crime/suspense books, I totally recommend that you read this one.

And then there were none (Agatha Christie)
I first read this book a couple of years ago, I had an idea about the plot but forgot how it ended, so I decided to read it again. So it was the Judge after all, what a twist!

|| Currently Reading:

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (Stephen R. Covey)

Principles and Values become more evident when we think of how short life is.

||Re-reading (For my Small Group Bible-study):

UNSTOPPABLE (Christine Caine)

Some start for the gold but end up with the bronze. Some start for the gold but do a poor exchange and can not continue. Some start for the gold but drop the baton and are disqualified. Some start for the gold and not only win the race, but break a record doing so.

|| Recent Adventure: A Mini-vacay!

So yours sincerely took a few days off to spend in Lagos. Yaaaas!!!
You know how I feel about the city already (You can read about my previous experiences here and here). This time around though, I was not constrained by a lack of “cash” or “time” nor any urgent business to take care of. I wanted to not just pass through Lagos, but actually savor it all over like a first-timer.

The summary of my stay was: Sightseeing, Window-shopping (plus some micro-shopping…lol), People-watching, Reading novels, Eating and Sleeping. I eventually stayed more indoors than outdoors, and found it kinda boring, thanks to EKEDC…😑🙄

I went off to visit one of my friends (@Tyn) and enjoyed every moment of it. Also went on a date with my sister to watch the movie, FLATLINERS (a Sci-Fi/Medical Thriller/Horror combo). The plot wasn’t too bad, in my opinion. Definitely PG material.

Then I ran into one of my seniors from Unilorin, Eyitayo, at the Palms Mall (saw him last in 2010…haha), I started “gisting” my sis how he is such a prominent figure on FB, and a kind-of-social activist etc. He is someone I actually respect (from a distance) and it was an honor to see him again, howbeit for a few minutes.

Finally, I got to ride in an Uber, then a BRT bus for the first time ever and I enjoyed both (for different reasons). Lagos is such a lovely place tbh, I just don’t see myself living there. But who knows, ehn?😉


Enjoy the lovely views!


To wrap up the post, here are my

|| 9 Intriguing Lessons [plus 1 Life Changing Discovery] from 2017:

1. Social media is overrated. I know it sounds cliché, but I’m only beginning to understand that phrase. I’ve now realized that Facebook (which was the social media platform I used the most) is not that important. I used to think it was impossible for me to do without Facebook in a day until I actually put some structure to my social media time and now I have days when I completely forget to log in. It’s amazing isn’t it? Ever wondered what we all did before the advent of social media?

2. Not everything that is happening will continue to happen. “Time” and “Chance” happens to all men. If you’re a Nigerian living in Nigeria, have you ever wondered what happened to the likes of Mr. Biggs and Tantalizers? My sentiments exactly.

3. Time alone doesn’t make things better, deliberate actions do. Thanks to the Mother Hen (Remi Owadokun) for this. If something is bad and you do nothing about it, it will only get worse.

4. Forgiveness is not forgetfulness, but choosing not to remember. Choosing not to remember an offense is quite different from forgetting it, as if it never happened. I so needed that closure. Phew!

5. What you do is more important than what you know. We have many “knowers” but far too few “doers.” Memo to me. Noted!

6. To every stage in life, there is a backstage and to every scene there’s a behind-the-scene. Truth!

7. Others are different from you, and so are you from others. Our unity lies in our individual uniqueness and not in our uniformity (or conformity).

8. (More than your phones, wallets, money, relationships etc) The enemy targets your joy, don’t let him steal it!

9. The Nigerian Police may (or may not) be your friend. Not all policemen are unkind, rude or wicked. Ditto Lawyers, Nurses, Doctors etc Having a preconceived mindset can be harmful.

10. I don’t like bread. In fact, I’ve never liked it, and I’m only just realizing that. So I’ve only been tolerating bread all my life?! Well, it’s better late than never.

|| Inspiration from around the web:

1. On Adulting, Rounding Up My Housemanship Year and Future Plans

2. Why I Shut Down My Instagram Account (Cutting back to move forward)
3. What it means to be a Christian doctor

4. Preparation: A lesson from Hurricane Irma

5. Nothing to prove

Ps: Still on the job search, if you’ve been praying, please pray harder! 🙏🏾
___

*EKEDC: Eko Electricity Distribution Company

:::Requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️

THE BUCKET-LIST OF AN AVERAGE NIGERIAN: Six Simple Wishes!

image

 

For the average Nigerian living in Nigeria, whether male or female, the good life is pretty much basic:

1. Settle down on time (aka get married between your mid 20s and early 30s, beyond that you’re a latecomer. In Nigeria, if you’ve not married, you’ve not arrived).

2. Find a good source of income (a white collar job or a thriving business venture or better still both, and earn above 100K in a month, at least).

3. Give your kids the best education you can afford (Primary, Secondary and Tertiary; all private schools if you can, because ASUU is a monster).

4. Build your own house(s) and buy your own car(s), whichever comes first. (It doesn’t matter if you fail to plaster the walls before you move into the house or your first car is a used 1980 Toyota model; As long as you’re a landlord and car owner, you’re successful).

5. Don’t die prematurely. There are a lot of unique but avoidable ways to die as an average Nigerian- RTAs, Armed Robbery Attacks, Fire Outbreaks and Medical Negligence, are just a few. (Nigerians love to live, no matter how bleak the future looks, after all a living dog is a better than a dead lion, na bible talk am. Ecclesiastes 9:4).

6. Retire to eat the fruits of your labor (i.e. your children get to graduate, start working, marry into wealth, make beautiful grandchildren, then relocate abroad where you can visit them as often as you want, after all they are your major investments!).

Maybe there are some individual twists to what I’ve mentioned based on personal interests, but no average Nigerian can deny relating to at least one of the above.

E go better” is the mantra of the Average Nigerian.
-It’s the reason we hustle (a refined name for struggling), from dawn to dusk just to make ends meet.
-It’s what we hope for every day of our lives, gathering in religious houses from week to week, holding special programs and giving special offerings, just to be blessed by the Almighty.
-It’s why we are restless and dissatisfied when others seem to be making better progress than we are.
In Nigeria, we thrive on sweat rather than sense, we own more buildings than we build people.

We are by nature myopic, more concerned about how we can get more rather than give more. Who wants to invest in a sick nation like Nigeria? The public civil servant just wants to collect his monthly salary and go home. There are bills to be paid, from DSTV monthly subscription to the Children’s school fees for the term.
The average Nigerian is less concerned about making any difference, whether local or global. Not the classroom teacher who just wants the day to end, not the nurse in the hospital ward already frustrated from the overwhelming workload and definitely not the police officer collecting bribes at the security checkpoint.

It is why many of our leaders lie and steal and get away with it. After all they are only sharing the national cake, which belongs to everybody but nobody in particular. And who wants to catch them? EFCC? Pls try again.

We the followers are not much different, as long as we can afford to fence our own compounds and provide for our basic amenities like electricity and water, the rest of the nation can go to rot.

So back to the bucket-list, what can we do to change our priorities from that of merely surviving to actually flourishing as Nigerians living in Nigeria? How can we make a paradigm shift from our attitude of consumption to that of contribution? Where do we even begin from?
My mum once mentioned this phrase while praying for my siblings and I recently, “They didn’t choose to be Nigerians…”
Neither did you. But now that you’re here, why not make your impact felt?
I’m Nigerian and Blessed.
:::requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️
*ASUU: Academic Staff Union of Universities

*EFCC: Economic and Financial Crime Commission

MY MDCN EXPERIENCE (Part 1): GENERAL TIPS 

Hello People,
This is for the Foreign Trained Doctors who want to take the Nigerian Medical Licensing Exam conducted by the Medical And Dental Council Of Nigeria (MDCN).

(Pls note that the exam is applicable to both citizens and non-citizens of Nigeria).
Having successfully participated in the last licensing exam that took place at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), I will share a few helpful tips:


1. Resume the MDCN remedial course early and learn your ropes quickly. The earlier you get settled into the program, the easier it will be for you.
2. Know how to take the routine vital signs (BP, RR, PR) and the normal values across age groups. It’ll likely be your first test, and if you’re on point, you’ll be the BOSS.

3. Be confident and always say what you know. Silence is assumed for ignorance. Even when you’re not sure, just say something.

4. Guys, don’t forget your ties. Without it, you don’t belong on the ward. Come along with your ward coats, scrubs (preferably green if you’ll be in LUTH) and name tags too.

5. Malaria and TB are super high yield. Learn all you can about them beforehand.

6. Revise your history taking and physical examination skills ( especially CVS, RS, ABD and CNS). You’ll be glad you did.

7. Stand TALL, let no one intimidate you. Bad belle people dey Naija. They don’t really like how you went to spend “their” dollars abroad 🙄🙄

8. Don’t go solo, your colleagues will usually know something important that you don’t know.

9. If you could scale through medical school (no matter where you studied) you can survive MDCN. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

Image credit: WEB

10. Pray without ceasing. It is NOT a Joke!


Cheers!
:::requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️

For more information about MDCN, please visit www.mdcn.gov.ng

DAY 16: SMALL FAVORS!!!

Welcome back.
Tonight I miss SVG, especially the smooth living conditions…wifi, light, running water, great variety of food, easy shopping et al.
My life was so simple and easy to organize.
You don’t consider how blessed you are until you have to do without one or two conveniences.
Those seemly insignificant things I enjoyed and often took for granted, have become a luxury since returning to Nigeria.
Things as simple as listening to music while in the shower, taking a walk or doing some chores, have been next to impossible.
In the last few days/weeks especially, I’ve been on a battery-saving regimen for all my electronic gadgets as the light situation in my current neighborhood is almost non-existent.
Governor Ambode, pls epp us na!😥😰😪
To be honest, this is one reason why some of my posts for this blog challenge are being delayed or canceled altogether. Talk about a very “challenging” challenge.
Anyway I’m not here to whine or complain 🤓😄 because despite the situation…
I’m thankful for God’s goodness and lots of small favors. 
Especially the ones I often take for granted:
1- Shelter: Nothing fancy, but an affordable, accessible and safe place to live in.
2- Food: it doesn’t matter whether or not I eat rice, bread or noodles every other day of the week. Thank God for eggs, beef, fish and fried plantain. My meals are never dull.
3- Clothing: Thank God for “wash and wear” attires (60% of my wardrobe can do without ironing) and a durable, multipurpose footwear that goes anywhere and everywhere. Black flats are bae!!!
And believe it or not, I’m thankful for street vendors (every basic need is within reach), okadas/kekes (fast and affordable means of transportation), the local fetchers (I can buy water at a token fee), my power bank (to augment power supply) and yes, a plastic hand fan (to keep heat, flies and mosquitoes away).
Lest I forget, I’m also thankful for pure water!!! (cheap and clean water to drink) 😂😆
pure-water-sachets
Again, thank God for small favors.
 
In the words of Apostle Paul, (I can say by faith):
I know what it is to be in need and what it is to have more than enough. I have learnt this secret, so that anywhere, at any time, I am content, whether I am full or hungry, whether I have too much or too little. I have the strength to face all conditions by the power that Christ gives me.”
‭‭Philippians‬ ‭4:12-13‬ ‭GNB‬‬
Let me also add that I’m glad to be back in Nigeria. There have been numerous testimonies. God remains faithful while the enemy is continually defeated.
Like my friend, Lekan Oyekanmi, sang, I believe things are working in Nigeria.
Nigeria will arise. And SOON.
So what are you thankful for today?
***

For deliciousness creating butterflies in your belly,

Contact BUTTERFLIESTREATS for your weddings, birthdays and other events

We make cakes (fondant, buttercream), small chops, snacks etc 

Location: Oyo town, Oyo state, Nigeria.

Contact: 07063502765

Butterfliestreats@gmail.com

@butterfliestreats (instagram)

***

asa

Stay fervent,
:::requ1ne:::

JUDICIOUS JANUARY!!!

Hola!

Como estas?

Para mi,

Estoy bien, gracias.


It’s a NEW YEAR already!!

But really, where did 2016 run to? 😁

I’m so grateful for the new year, because it is a fresh beginning and there’s so much to hope for.

I’m talking about my Goals for 2017; and here’s a snippet:


Yup…I’m very intentional about learning Spanish and Igbo this year, taking creative writing courses PRN, and I look forward to designing a Journal demo…because keeping a journal is so essential, and if you’ve never tried it before, now is a good time to start. I’m trusting God to bring all these to pass.

Like I wrote in the last post, I’m finally here in NIGERIA live! And of all the things I imagined before my return, the experience has just been…amusing, to say the least. Because:

“Life is better experienced, than imagined.”

Nigeria is just d.i.f.f.e.r.e.n.t. in all ramifications, every day is another story. What can I even say?  Anyway, for now I’m here to stay ☺️

And I’m determined not just to survive but to enjoy every single blessed day in this country. So in the last few weeks I’ve been up and about, and visited a few interesting places.


And guess who had a surprise welcome-back party? I couldn’t believe my eyes that evening as friends and family gathered in our house with food, drinks and music. My homeys are amazingly deep!! I was elated. I didn’t even know anything was going on right under my nose.😂

Anyway, the year is still young and bubbling with energy, so we have to be intentional this first month…hence the title of my post. What does it mean to be judicious?

Judicious (adjective): wise, sensible, prudent, insightful, informed, clever, enlightened…

Those are few terms synonymous with the word Judicious. And here are 5 ways you can make judicious use of January:

1. Start with God.

If there’s anything I’m grateful for in 2016, it is how I started the year.

Here’s what I wrote in my journal on the first of January,


And this was my prophetic declaration for last year,


The WORD works, my life is such a TESTIMONY. So this year is not an exception, my theme is SEEKING GOD, and I know he can be found and rewards those who diligently seek him.

The scripture verse for the month is “Instead, be concerned above everything else with the Kingdom of God and with what he requires of you, and he will provide you with all these other things.”

Matthew‬ ‭6:33‬ ‭GNB‬‬

http://bible.com/296/mat.6.33.gnb

And to paraphrase it, as for me I choose God over everything else:


The song in my spirit is GIVE ME YOU (Shana Wilson)

2. Set goals.

I’ve already shared some of my goals for the year, and thanks to my TFSA sisters, I was even able to put up a vision board.


VISION BOARD 2017.

What has God impressed upon your heart for this year? How do you plan to run after the assignment(s)?

A good way to start is to set monthly/weekly planners and have a daily to-do-list. It really works for me.

Life doesn’t always turn out as planned, but planning surely makes life easier.

3. Read books.


Here are all the books currently in my library and I look forward to reading every single one. For this month I decided to finish up:

– BOOK OF QUESTIONS (Garry Poole) and

-Jesus among other gods (Ravi Zacharias)

And I have started reading these two:

– Passing it on (Myles Munroe) and

– When God whispers your name (Max Lucado)

You can tell that I’m quite excited.

4. Be diligent. 

This is a  year where you can’t afford to be lazy.

Say NO to Procrastination, slothfulness and self indulgence.

You need to be up and about and start early.

Let your motto be:

Learn, Practice and Teach.

2017 is a year to make a difference. 

MY FEGGO DIARIES just made it through the first proofreading phase a few days back, if you think writing and publishing a book is beans, pls do have a rethink. The book was due for release last November but….it shall soon become a reality in Jesus’ name.🙏🏾🙏🏾🙏🏾

Here’s my final cover page btw:
(Designed by: zoehambolu@gmail.com)

In February, I’ll be doing a challenge: 26 BLESSINGS AND COUNTING. 

I’m sure you don’t want to miss it, cos it’s gonna be loaded by God’s grace. There’s just so much to thank God for but I’ve highlighted just a few. So get ready with your notepad and pen to write everything you’re thankful for this new year.

5. Reflect.

When all is said and done, you need to take stock of how you’ve spent the year. The lessons, the challenges, and the testimonies. It’s a good thing to do that as often as possible. After keeping daily diaries consecutively for the past 4 years (2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016), I’ve decided to start a weekly journal. And it’s going to be more reflective than narrative.

Lastly, I’m creating FREE ADVERT slots per blogpost for my Facebook friends with small businesses.

I’ll come up with details ASAP.

Stay Judicious this month!


😎😎😎

Thanks for reading.

:::requ1ne:::

MY GREEN PASSPORT & FOUR COUNTRIES.

Hey People,

So yours sincerely returned to Nigeria a few days ago.

Thankfully, I had a smooth journey, there were no flight delays or cancellations.

I transversed the Atlantic Ocean, from the Caribbean to the United Kingdom and finally Africa. The entire journey took approximately 16 hours, minus the stop overs.

So here is a mini breakdown of my trip and the things I enjoyed about it:

1. SVG TO LONDON

I left SVG on Monday afternoon amidst hugs and some reserved tears, for St. Lucia on the LIAT airline. It was my first time in St. Lucia and though I didn’t get off the plane, I could see that it would be a cool place to visit. A few more passengers came on board and we left for Barbados. The entire journey from St. Vincent to Barbados was about 1 hr 15 minutes. Barbados is a MUST for anyone considering a vacation in the Caribbean. Thankfully, the immigration process was smooth. I’ve learnt not to take it personal when the Barbados Immigration officials ask random, annoying questions about why I’m visiting and when I’m supposed to leave. I had the experience the last two times I was in Barbados.

I was able to use the bathroom and have a light snack before boarding the British Airways to the UK. I don’t know why, but food is always tastier while I’m in transit. As a rule I eat more and try out new food. I don’t understand why LIAT airline doesn’t serve complimentary meals. There should be a law that all airlines have to serve meals no matter the duration of the flight. 

The flight to the UK was about 8 hours, but it was the most enjoyable because I had enough to eat and entertain myself with. I also watched ANGRY BIRDS Movie and THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS, and slept for the rest of the trip. 

2. LONDON TO CASABLANCA 

On arrival at the GATWICK Airport, I passed through immigration with ease and then found my way to the train station. 

With two luggages and a hand bag, it was tough navigating the several stairs I encountered. But God was faithful to bring a couple of sweet gentlemen my way at intervals. Londoners are too kind. Don’t you agree? 

“Can I help you with that?”

“Yes please, thank you so much”

“Do you need help?”

“Yes, I’ll appreciate it.”

Oh my, I was too pleased to hand over my luggage every time. I actually took on the role of a Princess in distress…hahaha.


I took the train from Gatwick to Victoria Park, then to South Kensington, from where I got on the Piccadilly line and we went from station to station, until I finally got down at the Terminal 4 of Heathrow Airport. 


I was able to have a typical English breakfast at an airport cafe, then walked around for some window (more than actual) shopping. I almost embarrassed myself while asking about some wristwatches, I didn’t realize the prices were all in 4 digits. When I discovered my error, I quietly left the store for another.

By evening, I was on board the Royal Air Maroc in a flight to Casablanca, Morocco. It was a less fun (no TV for entertainment) trip but I absolutely enjoyed the meals served. For a 3-hour trip, we had more than enough to eat and drink. Eating and Sleeping were my favorite activities, since I didn’t download any novels to read. Candy crush disappointedly refused to open as well. There was a bit of people-watching on my part too, and for the first time I discovered Non-Nigerian Pidgin speakers. 

3. CASABLANCA TO NIGERIA

I didn’t realize until my flight that English wasn’t an official language in the country, I heard more of Arabic and French. I was able to buy a few more items at the Airport and the currency in use was Euros. I later learnt their official currency is Moroccan Dirham (MAD). I was quite exhausted walking around the shops. My flight to Nigeria was around midnight and it took us 4 hours to get to Lagos. There was more eating and sleeping during the flight. Since Nigeria is a hour ahead of Morocco, we arrived about 5 a.m. (Nigerian Time). 




I was surprised that the MURITALA MOHAMMED INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, Lagos, was more sophisticated than the last time I visited (in 2014), and there was even air conditioning in the arrival lounge. So I was welcomed in the typical Nigerian way, and it was only in Nigeria that the Green Passport was classified as a priority. 

“Do you have the Nigerian Passport?”

“Yes”

“Go that way”

After passing through the immigration, there were porters all over asking if I needed help with my luggages, taxi service, or calls. I was also approached to change foreign currency. It was good to be home. There were several eateries, stands for Network providers and some business centers. I didn’t see much of souvenir shops though. A porter allowed me to call my mum and led me to an eatery where I bought a snack and bottle of water, I couldn’t get access to wifi and was really exhausted because I had to wait for about 5 hours before I was eventually picked up, thanks to Lagos traffic et al. 

Now that I’m home I would like to write about 7 common myths about staying abroad. It promises to be enlightening. Stay tuned.


Thanks for reading,

:::requ1ne:::