THE BUCKET-LIST OF AN AVERAGE NIGERIAN: Six Simple Wishes!

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For the average Nigerian living in Nigeria, whether male or female, the good life is pretty much basic:

1. Settle down on time (aka get married between your mid 20s and early 30s, beyond that you’re a latecomer. In Nigeria, if you’ve not married, you’ve not arrived).

2. Find a good source of income (a white collar job or a thriving business venture or better still both, and earn above 100K in a month, at least).

3. Give your kids the best education you can afford (Primary, Secondary and Tertiary; all private schools if you can, because ASUU is a monster).

4. Build your own house(s) and buy your own car(s), whichever comes first. (It doesn’t matter if you fail to plaster the walls before you move into the house or your first car is a used 1980 Toyota model; As long as you’re a landlord and car owner, you’re successful).

5. Don’t die prematurely. There are a lot of unique but avoidable ways to die as an average Nigerian- RTAs, Armed Robbery Attacks, Fire Outbreaks and Medical Negligence, are just a few. (Nigerians love to live, no matter how bleak the future looks, after all a living dog is a better than a dead lion, na bible talk am. Ecclesiastes 9:4).

6. Retire to eat the fruits of your labor (i.e. your children get to graduate, start working, marry into wealth, make beautiful grandchildren, then relocate abroad where you can visit them as often as you want, after all they are your major investments!).

Maybe there are some individual twists to what I’ve mentioned based on personal interests, but no average Nigerian can deny relating to at least one of the above.

E go better” is the mantra of the Average Nigerian.
-It’s the reason we hustle (a refined name for struggling), from dawn to dusk just to make ends meet.
-It’s what we hope for every day of our lives, gathering in religious houses from week to week, holding special programs and giving special offerings, just to be blessed by the Almighty.
-It’s why we are restless and dissatisfied when others seem to be making better progress than we are.
In Nigeria, we thrive on sweat rather than sense, we own more buildings than we build people.

We are by nature myopic, more concerned about how we can get more rather than give more. Who wants to invest in a sick nation like Nigeria? The public civil servant just wants to collect his monthly salary and go home. There are bills to be paid, from DSTV monthly subscription to the Children’s school fees for the term.
The average Nigerian is less concerned about making any difference, whether local or global. Not the classroom teacher who just wants the day to end, not the nurse in the hospital ward already frustrated from the overwhelming workload and definitely not the police officer collecting bribes at the security checkpoint.

It is why many of our leaders lie and steal and get away with it. After all they are only sharing the national cake, which belongs to everybody but nobody in particular. And who wants to catch them? EFCC? Pls try again.

We the followers are not much different, as long as we can afford to fence our own compounds and provide for our basic amenities like electricity and water, the rest of the nation can go to rot.

So back to the bucket-list, what can we do to change our priorities from that of merely surviving to actually flourishing as Nigerians living in Nigeria? How can we make a paradigm shift from our attitude of consumption to that of contribution? Where do we even begin from?
My mum once mentioned this phrase while praying for my siblings and I recently, “They didn’t choose to be Nigerians…”
Neither did you. But now that you’re here, why not make your impact felt?
I’m Nigerian and Blessed.
:::requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️
*ASUU: Academic Staff Union of Universities

*EFCC: Economic and Financial Crime Commission

MY MDCN EXPERIENCE (Part 1): GENERAL TIPS 

Hello People,
This is for the Foreign Trained Doctors who want to take the Nigerian Medical Licensing Exam conducted by the Medical And Dental Council Of Nigeria (MDCN).

(Pls note that the exam is applicable to both citizens and non-citizens of Nigeria).
Having successfully participated in the last licensing exam that took place at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), I will share a few helpful tips:


1. Resume the MDCN remedial course early and learn your ropes quickly. The earlier you get settled into the program, the easier it will be for you.
2. Know how to take the routine vital signs (BP, RR, PR) and the normal values across age groups. It’ll likely be your first test, and if you’re on point, you’ll be the BOSS.

3. Be confident and always say what you know. Silence is assumed for ignorance. Even when you’re not sure, just say something.

4. Guys, don’t forget your ties. Without it, you don’t belong on the ward. Come along with your ward coats, scrubs (preferably green if you’ll be in LUTH) and name tags too.

5. Malaria and TB are super high yield. Learn all you can about them beforehand.

6. Revise your history taking and physical examination skills ( especially CVS, RS, ABD and CNS). You’ll be glad you did.

7. Stand TALL, let no one intimidate you. Bad belle people dey Naija. They don’t really like how you went to spend “their” dollars abroad 🙄🙄

8. Don’t go solo, your colleagues will usually know something important that you don’t know.

9. If you could scale through medical school (no matter where you studied) you can survive MDCN. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

Image credit: WEB

10. Pray without ceasing. It is NOT a Joke!


Cheers!
:::requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️

For more information about MDCN, please visit www.mdcn.gov.ng

DAY 16: SMALL FAVORS!!!

Welcome back.
Tonight I miss SVG, especially the smooth living conditions…wifi, light, running water, great variety of food, easy shopping et al.
My life was so simple and easy to organize.
You don’t consider how blessed you are until you have to do without one or two conveniences.
Those seemly insignificant things I enjoyed and often took for granted, have become a luxury since returning to Nigeria.
Things as simple as listening to music while in the shower, taking a walk or doing some chores, have been next to impossible.
In the last few days/weeks especially, I’ve been on a battery-saving regimen for all my electronic gadgets as the light situation in my current neighborhood is almost non-existent.
Governor Ambode, pls epp us na!😥😰😪
To be honest, this is one reason why some of my posts for this blog challenge are being delayed or canceled altogether. Talk about a very “challenging” challenge.
Anyway I’m not here to whine or complain 🤓😄 because despite the situation…
I’m thankful for God’s goodness and lots of small favors. 
Especially the ones I often take for granted:
1- Shelter: Nothing fancy, but an affordable, accessible and safe place to live in.
2- Food: it doesn’t matter whether or not I eat rice, bread or noodles every other day of the week. Thank God for eggs, beef, fish and fried plantain. My meals are never dull.
3- Clothing: Thank God for “wash and wear” attires (60% of my wardrobe can do without ironing) and a durable, multipurpose footwear that goes anywhere and everywhere. Black flats are bae!!!
And believe it or not, I’m thankful for street vendors (every basic need is within reach), okadas/kekes (fast and affordable means of transportation), the local fetchers (I can buy water at a token fee), my power bank (to augment power supply) and yes, a plastic hand fan (to keep heat, flies and mosquitoes away).
Lest I forget, I’m also thankful for pure water!!! (cheap and clean water to drink) 😂😆
pure-water-sachets
Again, thank God for small favors.
 
In the words of Apostle Paul, (I can say by faith):
I know what it is to be in need and what it is to have more than enough. I have learnt this secret, so that anywhere, at any time, I am content, whether I am full or hungry, whether I have too much or too little. I have the strength to face all conditions by the power that Christ gives me.”
‭‭Philippians‬ ‭4:12-13‬ ‭GNB‬‬
Let me also add that I’m glad to be back in Nigeria. There have been numerous testimonies. God remains faithful while the enemy is continually defeated.
Like my friend, Lekan Oyekanmi, sang, I believe things are working in Nigeria.
Nigeria will arise. And SOON.
So what are you thankful for today?
***

For deliciousness creating butterflies in your belly,

Contact BUTTERFLIESTREATS for your weddings, birthdays and other events

We make cakes (fondant, buttercream), small chops, snacks etc 

Location: Oyo town, Oyo state, Nigeria.

Contact: 07063502765

Butterfliestreats@gmail.com

@butterfliestreats (instagram)

***

asa

Stay fervent,
:::requ1ne:::

JUDICIOUS JANUARY!!!

Hola!

Como estas?

Para mi,

Estoy bien, gracias.


It’s a NEW YEAR already!!

But really, where did 2016 run to? 😁

I’m so grateful for the new year, because it is a fresh beginning and there’s so much to hope for.

I’m talking about my Goals for 2017; and here’s a snippet:


Yup…I’m very intentional about learning Spanish and Igbo this year, taking creative writing courses PRN, and I look forward to designing a Journal demo…because keeping a journal is so essential, and if you’ve never tried it before, now is a good time to start. I’m trusting God to bring all these to pass.

Like I wrote in the last post, I’m finally here in NIGERIA live! And of all the things I imagined before my return, the experience has just been…amusing, to say the least. Because:

“Life is better experienced, than imagined.”

Nigeria is just d.i.f.f.e.r.e.n.t. in all ramifications, every day is another story. What can I even say?  Anyway, for now I’m here to stay ☺️

And I’m determined not just to survive but to enjoy every single blessed day in this country. So in the last few weeks I’ve been up and about, and visited a few interesting places.


And guess who had a surprise welcome-back party? I couldn’t believe my eyes that evening as friends and family gathered in our house with food, drinks and music. My homeys are amazingly deep!! I was elated. I didn’t even know anything was going on right under my nose.😂

Anyway, the year is still young and bubbling with energy, so we have to be intentional this first month…hence the title of my post. What does it mean to be judicious?

Judicious (adjective): wise, sensible, prudent, insightful, informed, clever, enlightened…

Those are few terms synonymous with the word Judicious. And here are 5 ways you can make judicious use of January:

1. Start with God.

If there’s anything I’m grateful for in 2016, it is how I started the year.

Here’s what I wrote in my journal on the first of January,


And this was my prophetic declaration for last year,


The WORD works, my life is such a TESTIMONY. So this year is not an exception, my theme is SEEKING GOD, and I know he can be found and rewards those who diligently seek him.

The scripture verse for the month is “Instead, be concerned above everything else with the Kingdom of God and with what he requires of you, and he will provide you with all these other things.”

Matthew‬ ‭6:33‬ ‭GNB‬‬

http://bible.com/296/mat.6.33.gnb

And to paraphrase it, as for me I choose God over everything else:


The song in my spirit is GIVE ME YOU (Shana Wilson)

2. Set goals.

I’ve already shared some of my goals for the year, and thanks to my TFSA sisters, I was even able to put up a vision board.


VISION BOARD 2017.

What has God impressed upon your heart for this year? How do you plan to run after the assignment(s)?

A good way to start is to set monthly/weekly planners and have a daily to-do-list. It really works for me.

Life doesn’t always turn out as planned, but planning surely makes life easier.

3. Read books.


Here are all the books currently in my library and I look forward to reading every single one. For this month I decided to finish up:

– BOOK OF QUESTIONS (Garry Poole) and

-Jesus among other gods (Ravi Zacharias)

And I have started reading these two:

– Passing it on (Myles Munroe) and

– When God whispers your name (Max Lucado)

You can tell that I’m quite excited.

4. Be diligent. 

This is a  year where you can’t afford to be lazy.

Say NO to Procrastination, slothfulness and self indulgence.

You need to be up and about and start early.

Let your motto be:

Learn, Practice and Teach.

2017 is a year to make a difference. 

MY FEGGO DIARIES just made it through the first proofreading phase a few days back, if you think writing and publishing a book is beans, pls do have a rethink. The book was due for release last November but….it shall soon become a reality in Jesus’ name.🙏🏾🙏🏾🙏🏾

Here’s my final cover page btw:
(Designed by: zoehambolu@gmail.com)

In February, I’ll be doing a challenge: 26 BLESSINGS AND COUNTING. 

I’m sure you don’t want to miss it, cos it’s gonna be loaded by God’s grace. There’s just so much to thank God for but I’ve highlighted just a few. So get ready with your notepad and pen to write everything you’re thankful for this new year.

5. Reflect.

When all is said and done, you need to take stock of how you’ve spent the year. The lessons, the challenges, and the testimonies. It’s a good thing to do that as often as possible. After keeping daily diaries consecutively for the past 4 years (2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016), I’ve decided to start a weekly journal. And it’s going to be more reflective than narrative.

Lastly, I’m creating FREE ADVERT slots per blogpost for my Facebook friends with small businesses.

I’ll come up with details ASAP.

Stay Judicious this month!


😎😎😎

Thanks for reading.

:::requ1ne:::

MY GREEN PASSPORT & FOUR COUNTRIES.

Hey People,

So yours sincerely returned to Nigeria a few days ago.

Thankfully, I had a smooth journey, there were no flight delays or cancellations.

I transversed the Atlantic Ocean, from the Caribbean to the United Kingdom and finally Africa. The entire journey took approximately 16 hours, minus the stop overs.

So here is a mini breakdown of my trip and the things I enjoyed about it:

1. SVG TO LONDON

I left SVG on Monday afternoon amidst hugs and some reserved tears, for St. Lucia on the LIAT airline. It was my first time in St. Lucia and though I didn’t get off the plane, I could see that it would be a cool place to visit. A few more passengers came on board and we left for Barbados. The entire journey from St. Vincent to Barbados was about 1 hr 15 minutes. Barbados is a MUST for anyone considering a vacation in the Caribbean. Thankfully, the immigration process was smooth. I’ve learnt not to take it personal when the Barbados Immigration officials ask random, annoying questions about why I’m visiting and when I’m supposed to leave. I had the experience the last two times I was in Barbados.

I was able to use the bathroom and have a light snack before boarding the British Airways to the UK. I don’t know why, but food is always tastier while I’m in transit. As a rule I eat more and try out new food. I don’t understand why LIAT airline doesn’t serve complimentary meals. There should be a law that all airlines have to serve meals no matter the duration of the flight. 

The flight to the UK was about 8 hours, but it was the most enjoyable because I had enough to eat and entertain myself with. I also watched ANGRY BIRDS Movie and THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS, and slept for the rest of the trip. 

2. LONDON TO CASABLANCA 

On arrival at the GATWICK Airport, I passed through immigration with ease and then found my way to the train station. 

With two luggages and a hand bag, it was tough navigating the several stairs I encountered. But God was faithful to bring a couple of sweet gentlemen my way at intervals. Londoners are too kind. Don’t you agree? 

“Can I help you with that?”

“Yes please, thank you so much”

“Do you need help?”

“Yes, I’ll appreciate it.”

Oh my, I was too pleased to hand over my luggage every time. I actually took on the role of a Princess in distress…hahaha.


I took the train from Gatwick to Victoria Park, then to South Kensington, from where I got on the Piccadilly line and we went from station to station, until I finally got down at the Terminal 4 of Heathrow Airport. 


I was able to have a typical English breakfast at an airport cafe, then walked around for some window (more than actual) shopping. I almost embarrassed myself while asking about some wristwatches, I didn’t realize the prices were all in 4 digits. When I discovered my error, I quietly left the store for another.

By evening, I was on board the Royal Air Maroc in a flight to Casablanca, Morocco. It was a less fun (no TV for entertainment) trip but I absolutely enjoyed the meals served. For a 3-hour trip, we had more than enough to eat and drink. Eating and Sleeping were my favorite activities, since I didn’t download any novels to read. Candy crush disappointedly refused to open as well. There was a bit of people-watching on my part too, and for the first time I discovered Non-Nigerian Pidgin speakers. 

3. CASABLANCA TO NIGERIA

I didn’t realize until my flight that English wasn’t an official language in the country, I heard more of Arabic and French. I was able to buy a few more items at the Airport and the currency in use was Euros. I later learnt their official currency is Moroccan Dirham (MAD). I was quite exhausted walking around the shops. My flight to Nigeria was around midnight and it took us 4 hours to get to Lagos. There was more eating and sleeping during the flight. Since Nigeria is a hour ahead of Morocco, we arrived about 5 a.m. (Nigerian Time). 




I was surprised that the MURITALA MOHAMMED INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, Lagos, was more sophisticated than the last time I visited (in 2014), and there was even air conditioning in the arrival lounge. So I was welcomed in the typical Nigerian way, and it was only in Nigeria that the Green Passport was classified as a priority. 

“Do you have the Nigerian Passport?”

“Yes”

“Go that way”

After passing through the immigration, there were porters all over asking if I needed help with my luggages, taxi service, or calls. I was also approached to change foreign currency. It was good to be home. There were several eateries, stands for Network providers and some business centers. I didn’t see much of souvenir shops though. A porter allowed me to call my mum and led me to an eatery where I bought a snack and bottle of water, I couldn’t get access to wifi and was really exhausted because I had to wait for about 5 hours before I was eventually picked up, thanks to Lagos traffic et al. 

Now that I’m home I would like to write about 7 common myths about staying abroad. It promises to be enlightening. Stay tuned.


Thanks for reading,

:::requ1ne:::

THE HEENSPIRE STORY- Meet the Founder & CMO of HEENSPIRE Foods Company, Badejoko Adewale.

Hello people, so I had the opportunity to do this interview article for one of my great friends on social media, who inspires me a lot. He’s a young and passionate Christian, with a dynamic personality. He is also a budding entrepreneur who started a Food Company in Nigeria, last year.


In this interview he talks briefly about himself, why he decided to venture into starting a food company, and the kind of products the company offers. 

My questions are in BOLD letters while his answers have been italicized.

Enjoy reading! 

“Growing up, I nursed the secret ambition of finding cure for HIV/AIDS, quite lofty a dream for a child you’d agree, and I had it written and plastered at the back of my room’s door. Funny, none of my family member suffered from the disease, I just felt I could really be useful doing something truly great and remarkable for humanity. Well, that dream led me straight to medical school, but I guess it wasn’t strong enough to keep me there.”

1. How would you describe your amazing self? What was your favorite childhood dream of who you wanted to be in the future? 

Adewale: I’m a god-loving young man, note I didn’t say god-fearing, and if there’s anything I’m eager to tell anyone about me it would be that singular fact. I have a wide wild taste to things and as such I don’t have “favorites”. Too bad! No favorite food, color, movie, bible verse, cloths e.t.c. none, although I have some pretty high standards I must say. My philosophy to life is simple: what would Jesus do. So basically it’s the only question I ask myself in any situation. Lately I get to be called an “entrepreneur”a lot, but if there’s anything I’d rather be known by, it would be that guy that believes even the best can be made better, so I guess that makes me an entrepreneur right? *laughs* Growing up, I nursed the secret ambition of finding cure for HIV/AIDS, quite lofty a dream for a child you’d agree, and I had it written and plastered at the back of my room’s door. Funny, none of my family member suffered from the disease, I just felt I could really be useful doing something truly great and remarkable for humanity. Well, that dream led me straight to medical school, but I guess it wasn’t strong enough to keep me there.

 

2. Can you tell us a bit about Heenspire foods and what brought about the idea?

 

Adewale: After graduation, I had branched out into business and was consulting for some clients. I was required to take some trips around the country and it was perhaps on these many trips that I got an understanding to a common problem in Nigeria’s food/agriculture sector, but on one of those trips, to Lagos precisely, the light bulb moment came. The problem identified is that of wastage across our food chain which ubiquitously has its effects even on our health. Nigerian’s don’t get to enjoy enough good food at affordable prices because the bulk of the produce gets wasted even before its arrival to the local market. At the local market, the food becomes ridiculously expensive because everyone along the food chain (the farmer, the drivers, the traders and the many unseen market forces), tries to make profits from the small bits remaining. The customer at the table end now bears the brunt and since she has to eat, she has little choice. Realizing a solution is expedient, I sought simple ways to improve accessibility and affordability of agricultural produce and that gave rise to Heenspire Foods®. So Heenspire Foods at its core turns agricultural produce that could have gone to waste into healthy food products offering them at affordable price.

 

3. I know you studied Human Physiology as a discipline, how did you get from there to where you are now? 

 

Adewale: “All things work together for the good of those that love God and are called according to His purpose.” About and upon the time of completion of my undergraduate studies, I’d became interested in entrepreneurship; it was a concept so nascent and burgeoning in Nigeria at the time. The sparks came as a result of so many things; my parent owned some side-business and a course I took as an undergraduate also spirited it. After school I started reading, voraciously I must confess, about business and entrepreneurship, it became so natural to me that I could care less about the hours I spent studying. Entrepreneurship became so scientific and every bit artistic, that I could explain with the finest of human words its beauty, after a while I took the bold step to practice some of the things I’d learnt. Trust me; reading isn’t nearly as fun as doing. Interestingly, physiology gave me my first business opportunity and we haven’t looked back ever since.

 

4. What kind of products does your company offer? And how do you reach your customers?

 

Adewale: Currently we produce some variance of healthy snack on a budget. These are 100% organic fruit mixes, neatly crafted and delivered fresh to our customers. Our products are doses of vitamins and nutrients on the go, and are unbelievably affordable! The inspiration was simply to provide the Nigerian worker a daily serving of nutrients, pure and organic, even as they go about to achieve greatness for themselves. Customers could either subscribe to any of our fruity plans and get the products delivered to their office or simply locate our On-The-Go sales representatives to make instant purchase.


 

 

5. In a population as large and diverse as Nigeria, who are your target customers? And how affordable are your products?

 

Adewale: Our current offerings are targeted towards the Nigerian working class and young adults resident in major cities, lacking access to healthy organic food products. Our vision on the long run is to have healthy product offerings for every Nigerian, both young and old; we believe that every human being irrespective of social class deserves access to good food that promotes growth and development. The issue of food products being affordable is quite dear to me; it was a key reason why I started Heenspire Foods®. Come to think of it, where in this present Nigeria will you be able to buy 6 different types of fruits with 150 naira? But with the vision we’ve got, our customers get to enjoy the taste and nutrients of these fruits and that’s not all, customers who purchase any of our fruity subscriptions get to have their product delivered to their offices at no extra charge.

 

6. What is your biggest secret in succeeding as a newbie entrepreneur? And what are some of the obstacles you have faced?

 

Adewale: Quite frankly, success in business isn’t a function of one thing, it’s a combination of numerous efforts, efforts including marketing, product development, effective distribution channels, customer relations, personnel management, branding, sales and so many more, but for me, the total package I’ve found is in Jesus, He’s my biggest open secret. There’s a theory I’m currently developing, it’s called “Hustlebility”, it’s the degree of an entrepreneur’s resolution to make anything happen; anything is possible depending on the entrepreneur’s hustle ability to make his vision come alive. Of course I read a lot, I’m never averse to learning, it’s my way of maintaining my youthfulness and staying ahead of the curve. As for obstacles, they are quite abounding especially for a startup in this present economy, one that could be termed critical would be the sustainability of my supply chain. I have to think about where the raw materials are coming from, who’s growing them so I could be able to guarantee quality at the table’s end.

 

7. Who are your influences? And is there one person in particular that inspires you the most?

 

Adewale: I’m not the type of person given to role modelling, I believe in the peculiarity of the individual, nonetheless I’ve learnt (and still learning) a lot from different persons at different times, not necessarily just entrepreneurs, and I’ve found ways to cross-pollinate those lessons into business. Peter Drucker, Brian Tracy, Daymond John, Al Ries, Ayorinde Olukunle, Philip Kotler, and Adeniyi Oluwaseun, who by the way is my partner-in-entrepreneurship, are some of the many persons that have been helpful along my entrepreneurial journey.

 

 

8. With your background in health sciences, are there any health benefits to the products your company offers?

 

Adewale: When it comes to food, its all about health and wellness, other reasons are secondary. What’s the point of an unhealthy food? If it’s not healthy we don’t produce it, it’s a policy we abide by. All our products have health benefits and we don’t just stop at the level of serving these products alone, we go the extra mile to educate customers too. We have a nutrition education program and we use this platform to properly educate consumers about their health and the nutrition benefits of the food they eat, and the feedback has been tremendously great. We are making the consumers health conscious, to care about the source of their food. It’s a healthy food revolution we are inspiring.


 

9. What are some of the challenges currently facing the food industry in Nigeria? And what are the strategies you think should be put in place?

Adewale: All the way from farm to table there are numerous challenges. For one, we haven’t found effective ways to make fruits and agric produce available all year round, the adverse effect is that food produce become expensive when they are off season. There’s the challenge of distribution, there’s also the challenge of standards, visit the local market and you’ll cry to see how food are treated, it’s a show of disrespect for consumers. There’s the challenge of wastage. Our foods haven’t evolved enough to meet today’s nutritional needs. There’s the challenge of preference for foreign food products over those produced locally. So you see the challenges are numerous, and since they didn’t start overnight you don’t expect them disappear overnight. If we understand the concept of value chain properly, then maybe we can get the problems fixed.  


 

10. How do you see Heenspire Foods™ in the next 5 years?

 

Adewale: We hope by then to be serving in 15 major cities in Nigeria. Most certainly our products  would have evolved, some healthy food product range we intend to have launched, and of course the level of our impact in the course of spiriting a healthy generation increased.

 

Me: Thank you for your time.

Adewale: the pleasure is mine; I’ve had fun telling the Heenspire story.



***

:::Requ1ne:::

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEPTEMBER…

Hello Folks.
Welcome to September.

I don’t know about you guys but if you ask me, I think year 2016 deserves an award for its exceptional speed which in my humble opinion, is comparable only to that of…


Usain Bolt…haha😅

Pls where did January-August fly to? 🙄

Anyway, I’m thankful to God for life. Although the year is closing in, there are still many opportunities to learn, grow and achieve. And for that I’m also thankful. 
So here’s what’s up for the month:
Because I’m still in the transition phase between Medical School and “Real Life”, there’s a lot of believing to be done, so I’m keying into:

1. This SCRIPTURE 1 Cor 2:9

2. And this SONG- In Jesus’ name. 

3. I’m currently READING:

I. AWAKEN THE GIANT WITHIN (Anthony Robbins): This book is…I can’t even drop it, until I finish it. Tbh, it’s one of the most bulky books I’ve read in my life, content-wise. I recently learnt about writing a list of my top-most values (in order of priority) and I came up with this:

Then I told myself “No wonder you’re like this…” As nice as the list looks from a distance, on closer inspection, I really need to do better…the issue of COMFORT as the first priority can be a stumbling block if I’m to make a difference in the future.

II. TROPHY CHILD (Ted Cummingham): it’s an insightful book recommended for Parents and Parents-to-be…it’s never too EARLY/LATE to learn that having a “child-centered” home does more harm than good eventually. Biblically, a good marriage is primarily about the husband and wife, and then the Children (Genesis 2:24).

I recently completed: 

III. WHEN GOD WRITES YOUR LOVE STORY (Eric & Leslie Ludy) and the book was: 

A-M-A-Z-I-N-G! 

Here are some of the highlights for me:

  • “If God is preparing you to make an impact on this world for his kingdom, chances are he will take you through a period of loneliness.” It’s a hard pill to swallow.
  • “If you don’t allow God to give you a strong backbone and prepare you to stand apart from the crowd, you are prone to compromise.” Noted.
  • Don’t despise loneliness. Instead allow it to chase you into the ready arms of your king. If you turn to him instead of trying to fill the void with other things, you will find that he is ready to meet your every need.” 
  • “Every day you are single can be a chance to love your future spouse by preparing for your life together. Don’t waste this season, but let God help you cultivate every opportunity to become the man or woman they are dreaming of.” Hmmmn…
  • “Family is our rehearsal for relationships.” Haha…this one got me.😂
  • “Guys the way you treat your mom, is how you will treat your wives.” Ditto ladies.
  • “Godly teammates provide an outside perspective to a relationship.” Get older, wiser and experienced mentors for Accountability before/during your relationship

I just started:

IV. US (Daniel L. Tocchini): At a glance it’s a book against “the spirit of selfishness” in Marriage and I hope to gain lots of insight from it.
You can read about the variety of books in my library here

4. I’m still studying the BOOK OF PROVERBS with the help of Matthew Henry’s Commentary and I’m loving it.

5. PROJECTS:

I’m presently working on two writing projects:

I. SOJOURN IN SVG: This will be featured on the blog (later this year or early next year, by God’s grace). It’s a MEMOIR that depicts what it’s like to leave one’s home-country and live in a foreign land.

II. TWO MINUTES: This is a fictional piece that I hope to submit for an International Essay Writing Contest. It’s my second attempt at working on something SO BIG, and the 2000-word target is a little overwhelming. I’m taking it one step at a time, and we’ll see how it goes. 

6. Late ANNOUNCEMENT: I got MY FEGGO DIARIES (Prologue) published on Okadabooks.com last month, and I hope I can get the rest of the book published by December. You still have access to MY FEGGO DIARIES on the blog, pending its publication. Please if you have the Okadabooks app, you can download and read the book for FREE. 

7. ADVENTURES: Guess who visited the SVG PM’s official residence last weekend? Yours’ sincerely. Thanks to the Church who organized the event…it was FUN. And here are a few pictures:




And who knows what other adventure this month will bring?

8. NIGERIA is on my mind. It’s been 2 years and 4 months since I last visited my home-country. And while I won’t necessarily say I’m homesick, I must say I’m looking forward to returning home SOON…and I hope it will be as exciting as I’ve envisaged it.

Ibadan, Nigeria. (Photocredit: Nairaland)
9. I need practical suggestions about the art of MEDITATION. I’ve tried it a couple of times but I’ve not been consistent. I used the app SmilingMind and recently HeadSpace but the outcome has been less than desired. Any ideas please?

That’s all for now.

First Sunday in September, representing Naija!

I hope you all have an exciting SEPTEMBER. 
Thank you for reading,

:::requ1ne:::