JUNE 2019|| Mid-Year Review, Reflections And Resolutions.


Hello Fam,

It’s the middle of the year already and God has been indeed faithful.

I’m not exactly where I’d hoped to be (in some aspects of my life) but I celebrate where I am at the moment because it can only get better. 

Amen and Hallelujah. 🙌

Here’s a recap of the post I wrote at the beginning of the year 5 things to do in 2019.

I still need to TRUST God more (not just in words, but through my actions), there are many unrealized goals I have to work towards, and I certainly have to do better with taking stock and giving thanks.   

||REVIEW

(Randomly picked and edited most of these questions from online articles)

1. How would you describe the year so far?

Emm…Interesting (for lack of a better word). 

It’s been that kind of unforgettable year, not in a “big-bang” way, but in a “what else now?” kind of way.

2. What accomplishment(s) are you most proud of?

– Producing, Marketing & Selling a number of the Requine’s Journals and the sincere feedbacks I got from some of my customers (on ways to make the product even better). 

– Finally taking vaginal deliveries and repairing minor lacerations (this time last year it was only a dream).  

3. What major lessons have you learnt in this half-year?

Several. 

i) My life is shaped by my thoughts. A negative mindset will trigger negative actions which will trigger negative outcomes. 

ii) God speaks and the devil speaks, my responsibility is to decide whose voice I listen to.

iii) Success is a spectrum; there’s no total failure – there are only strategies that don’t work at a particular time, in a particular place and with a particular set of people.

iv) I’ve been graced for this season of my life and God is equipping me for the next season already.

v) What I bring to the table determines how I’m valued. To increase my value, I must increase my contributions. 

vi) I have nothing to prove but everything to improve. 

vii) There are always helpers to my destiny, it is my responsibility to pray them in.

viii) Success is attractive and inspires others to succeed. No one argues with results, it is self-proven.

ix) Nothing beats the reassurance that God is for me and with me. He knows what I need even before I ask him.

x) Every blessing is a responsibility, ditto answered prayers.

4. How are you different now than you were 6 months ago?

Physically fatter (sadly😞), a couple of thousands richer (thankfully) and a whole lot wiser.

5. What new relationships have you fostered?

Quite a number, especially with some of my colleagues at work. 

6. In what areas do you feel stuck?

– My current job is pretty demanding (physically and mentally) and I’m really looking forward to a better job opportunity. I can’t continue like this tbh…

– I’m also not getting the most out of my 2019 goals which is really discouraging.


7. What are you most grateful for?

– The gift of Life.

– The gift of Health: Physical and Mental.

– The gift of Men (Friends, Family and Colleagues).

||REFLECTIONS

Looking back to the beginning of this year I was pretty excited even without knowing what the year had to offer. 

2019 has indeed been an interesting year because everything isn’t going exactly according to my plan, but God is reminding me that it’s not up to me to make things happen. 

“Commit your way unto the Lord, TRUST also in him, and HE WILL bring it to pass.” Ps 37:5


I’ve had some exciting moments like getting a job and moving to another town, rekindling some old relationships and fostering new ones, and finding a place of worship where I fit right in.

I’ve also had a couple of challenges like meeting up with the demands of my job, on and off health issues, and experiencing joy in the midst of pain and disappointment.

Then I’ve suffered a few bouts of depression as well…feelings of frustration about being left behind in life, but thankfully I’m back on my feet.  

Partaking of DDK’s Ignition Intensive Series (an online coaching program) was definitely a mind blowing and defining experience for me.

Also, I’ve spent more time, effort and money on self-care (hairdo, beauty products etc) than in previous years. 

Lastly, I’ve read over a dozen books this year including:

Model Marriage (Deg-Heward Mills)

Jumpstart Your Leadership (John C. Maxwell)

For Married Women Only (Tony Evans)

Exploring The Secrets Of Success (Bishop David Oyedepo)

WORDS (Kenneth Hagin)

The Smart Money Woman (Arese Ugwu) 
 
Secrets of An Irresistible Woman (Michelle Mckiney Hammond)


||RESOLUTIONS

Going forward, I have decided to make the most of the remaining months of this year by prioritizing where I currently am over where I think I should be because when all is said and done, 

The best time to live is NOW. 

Henceforth, I choose to:

1) Find joy in the simple things. 

2) Live in the moment everyday. 

3) Be a blessing wherever I find myself.

4) Not stress myself over the things I CANNOT control. 

5) Stop believing the lies of satan that “I’m not enough.” 

So help me God.

***

Cheers to a Fantastic Month!!!

:::requ1ne:::

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A DAY IN THE LIFE || A NAIJA DOCTOR’S DIARY


*How my day started*

4:52 a.m. It’s too early, please go back to sleep.

5:17 a.m. No baby, still too early…go back to sleep. 

5:23 a.m. Sighs. Okay…you can get up now. Na work dey rush you. 

5:30 a.m. I’m already in the bathroom when my alarm rings.

After having my bath, I put some food on the gas cooker, then went back to bed to have my quiet time.

I had a quick breakfast of cereal (which will keep me till noon at least)

I also took an antibiotic thanks to a recurrent ear infection I’m battling with.


Then I packed some lunch because no satan is tempting me with stupid hunger at work today.



Finally stepped out of the house around 7:20 a.m. as I’m doing the 8 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. shift today.

***

7:35 a.m My pre-work glow.
Getting a few minutes of me-time.


8:15 a.m. Work has officially started but I’m yet to see my first patient which is very unusual

The first patient I saw was a toddler who had some episodes of vomiting and loose stool, and managed a case of enterocolitis with antibiotics and oral rehydration solution. 

The second patient was a newly diagnosed hypertensive who I spent a considerable amount of time counseling. 

*4 hours later*

12:25 pm It’s LUNCH TIME…yay!!!💃💃💃


1:45 p.m. After attending to a new admission on the ward, my energy level is like 30% . I don’t know where all the food I ate went o. Sighs.

2:00 pm Phew! Just saw my 12th patient for the day.

***

So I was called to see a patient in the Emergency room.

A little girl had a laceration inside her upper lip following a traumatic fall, thankfully the blood loss was minimal and her vitals were stable.


After cleaning out the area, I infiltrated with Xylocaine solution then sutured using vicryl 2.0.  

Though my surgical skills are pretty basic, I did a good job anyway. 



5:50 pm

I just finished reviewing a pregnant woman on the labor ward who is being induced. Every bone in my body feels tired. 

6:00 p.m.

Finally, my shift is over and I can officially take my leave. 💃💃💃

My extremely tired after-work look.😂😂😂

So here’s a list of all the cases I managed today:



***

Thank you for reading. Did you enjoy this blog?

:::requ1ne:::

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MAY|| Bounce Back + Life Lately.

Hey there, 

It feels like ages since I last visited this space. 

Like Nigerians would say, a lot of water has passed under the bridge.

The bridge, which in this context is my life. 

So much has happened (the good, the bad and the very ugly..😪😪😪) but the Lord remains good. 

He has never and will never fail.

So where do I start from?

||WORK

Practicing as a medical doctor can be super exhausting.

I thought being a House officer was hard, but the M.O life is NOT beans either. 

I literally work my butts off for every kobo I earn. 

Las, las, Adulting itself na scam, but we will all be alright. 

Still I’m super thankful that I have a job…cos we don’t complain, we give thanks. 🙌

||CURRENTLY LOVING 

Maybe I came a little late to the party, but in the last few weeks I’ve found myself binge-watching a number of VLOGS majorly by Nigerian YouTubers (Home and Abroad)…and most have super interesting content. 

My favorites include:

Let’s just say I found myself a new hobby😀


||HEALTH CHALLENGES

Satan is such a Sadist though. 

And a big liar too.

Yours truly seems to have taken more medications in the last few months than I have taken in an entire year of my life.

It has not been a funny experience, because almost every week there’s one ailment or the other to address.

I don’t know if it has to do with my work environment, stress level, immunity or poor dietary/lifestyle choices, but my health (both physical/mental) has taken a downward spiral lately and that is giving me serious concern. 

Please, pray for a sister. 🙏🏾🙏🏾🙏🏾


||WEDDING FEVER😍😍😍

Well…I have finally arrived at that phase of my life, where the idea of planning for a wedding doesn’t seem so ridiculous anymore.

I’ve been checking out Asoebi colors/combo, prewedding shoot scenes, wedding gown styles and researching a bit about wedding planning budget. 

Now don’t get too excited.

There’s no wedding date or anything yet. 

It’s still all in my head but it may be sooner than you expect…hehe.


||2019 GOALS

Let me just say, IT IS WELL.

And this is more than a cliché, it is REALLY well.

I started 2019 with the mindset of smashing my goals, Left, Right…and Centre.

Now it seems to be the other way round.

Some of my major goals seem to be mocking me right now. 

Like attaining the FitFamLife.

How hard can it be to make fresh fruit smoothies once a week?

It is really well with my soul.

God reminded me of the word he gave me at the beginning of the year:

“Commit thy way unto the Lord; trust also in him; and he shall bring it to pass.”

‭‭Psalms‬ ‭37:5‬ ‭KJV‬‬

http://bible.us/1/psa.37.4-5.kjv

So help me God.

***

Now that you’re upto date with my life, what have you been up to lately?

Please share.

Thank you for reading.

:::requ1ne:::
    ❤️❤️❤️

Housejob Chronicles: Memoirs of an Ex-Houseofficer (4)

1. Can we meet you?

I’m Dr Suberu Peter Omeiza. I graduated from Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Kaduna State in February 2017.

2. What was your favorite posting, and why? 

O and G, by a thousand miles!

The grimace on the face of a newborn when they let out that first sweet cry. The dramatic change in countenance of the mother immediately after delivery. 

Then I like the finiteness of ObGyn stuff. Unlike other specialties, you can finish knowing O and G. And as person wey no too like book, na ObGyn be the way. 

And finally, something in my heart draws me there!

3. What was your least favorite posting, and why? 

Surgery, of course. The work was too much. 
That posting temporarily “destroyed” my cooking career and made me indulge in lots of junk food, much to the detriment of my finances.

4. Your best call ever?

Calls where I slept all through, in which the “God of calm calls” manifested his power. 

And yes there’s a God of calm calls, they that know this shall eat the fruit thereof. 


5. Your worst call ever?

Any call I did not have time to prepare for psychologically. 

(A word for the would-be Intern: Never accept sudden calls, and avoid extra calls by all means, they will drain you).

6. Nicest chief you worked with:

Dr Palma Dennis

A humble and very approachable Chief. When he rebukes he does so in love, he is stressless and apt to teach. 

7. Most admirable consultant 

Dr. Temitope Odi, Paediatric Surgeon

One of the very few consultants I worked with that wasn’t fault-finding. 

He had a way of relating with residents and interns not as subordinates but as colleagues, and created a relaxed atmosphere for his team to work in.

I also admire him for his empathy. One morning after a busy call, he noticed how tired and unkempt I looked and instructed rage SR to give me an hour for me to freshen up. 

By his example, I know a man can rise in the medical profession as a Christian without giving in to pride.    

8. Most likely specialty, and why? 

O and G. You know why. 😀😇

9. Most unlikely specialty, and why?

Surgery. You also know why😏🙄

10. Three life lessons from housejob:

i) Money is a defence.

Most of the preventable mortalities I saw during Housejob were patients that were either illiterate, poor or both. They usually present late and cannot afford their medications and investigations. 

And the broke patient is the nemesis of the House officer, they make the HOs work harder. 

My counsel: Do whatever good it takes to become wealthy; it can and will prolong your life.

ii). Relationships are golden.

The good things of this life come from God but through men. A good relationship can sometimes prove more valuable than even money. 

I remember when my younger sister was sick and managed at the A&E, I’ll never forget the kind of favour we were shown by my colleagues and the other health workers.

Getting my housejob slot itself was a miracle of relationship. It came from God, but through two men. God helps men using other men, neglect this to your detriment. 

iii). We are pilgrims

When all is said and done, we shall all stand before the judgement seat of Christ to give account of lives. 

There is a world that is to come. Having watched some patients die, I have the consciousness of this world that is to come strong in my mind. 

My counsel: Strive to be great not only in this world, but also in that which is to come, because this world is temporal and that world is eternal.

11. Thankful about:
 

The people I met.

12. Most embarrassing moment during Housejob:

A presentation on Urethral Catheterization I had in Urology unit, where the Consultant lysed me with stuff. 

Despite my supposedly adequate preparation (we’ve been moving stuff on this topic since 400l na), it was a bloody experience! 😭😭😭

13. Happiest day during Housejob:

The day it all ended October 31st 2018. I felt free, relieved and lifted.

14. Something to miss about Housejob:

No, someone I’ll miss; Dr Adeniran.

15. Rate your Housejob experience on a scale of 1-5:

3 (It was pretty fun)

16. Call food: Yay or Nay? 

Nay.

17. Longest day during Housejob?

Can’t think of one🤔


18. Unforgettable patient?

None in particular. 

19. Any regrets?

Three things.

1) Not starting a Houseofficers Christian fellowship.

 A one-hour weekly or fortnightly fellowship would have helped in fostering togetherness and the fear of God among us. 

2) Not prioritizing savings over investments. 

Before investing you should have accumulated money in a savings account for at least a year.

The bigger the money, the easier it is to multiply it, the more careful you’ll be and the less the chances of losing it. 

3) Choosing NPMCN ObGyn primaries over IELTS. 

Raw waste of 90k. 😩😫

20. New skills learnt?

– Composure (ability to remain calm however bad the patient’s condition is. Fretting is dangerous)

– Responsibility 

– Several basic medical and surgical skills.

21. Favorite mantra:

“This life na standing fan”

A quote from one of our colleagues, Dr Ibenu Joshua. He says it playfully to imply that things in this life (good and bad) go round and come around.

I find the mantra interesting because of how accurately it applies to success and opportunities. 

Opportunity doesn’t come but once. It moves around like standing fan. Whether or not you are ready for, it will come. 

If you miss it once, it’ll go and come again. It’s an act of God’s mercy. But blessed is that man that opportunity meets prepared, he is made for life.

22. If not Medicine, then what?

Business (Website development, software development, graphic design, digital marketing) and Word Ministry.

23. Shout out to (tag 3 HOs):

My first shoutout goes to my roomie and friend, Dr Muluh Idris. A kind and tolerant person and very easily one of the nicest people I know. 

Then Dr Adeniran Eunice. She was my go-to person for gist, word, fun and comfort. Being around her lifts my spirit, always. She is the perfect blend of beauty, wisdom, spirituality and love. A real friend. A feminist whose feminity is very much intact. 

Also, Dr Ameh Emmanuel, a gentle man to the core. Almost always smiling. He works with a lot of dedication. Working with him in OnG posting was one of the pleasant moments I wouldn’t forget in a hurry.

24. What next after housejob? 



I’ll wait on God to receive strength and Word for the assignment that lies ahead (during NYSC). 

After service, I’ll go wherever God wants and do whatever He wants, be it the PLAB/Canada pathway, residency in Nigeria or full time Word Ministry.

25. More important as a HO, skill or stuff? 

Skill joor, who stuff epp? We’ll get the stuff when we come back for residency.


26.  Thank you for sharing your Housejob experience:

<Smiles> It’s my pleasure.

***

Editor’s Note:

Dr. Peter fondly called SPO, is an enthusiastic, self-motivated and multitalented friend. My go-to person for everything technical, a world class personal financial coach in making, and a generally lovely person to hangout with.

He’s a dynamic young man whose faith in God is beyond the tangible things. His passion on almost any topic is contagious and you can hardly miss his voice when you’re together in a room. 

When he’s not reading a good book, he enjoys playing a soccer game, listening to a sermon/music or watching an action movie. 


Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::

Housejob Chronicles: Memoirs of an Ex-HouseOfficer! (2)

Please read the previous part here
 

***

 1. Can we meet you?

 

I’m Dr Sarah Ifeoluwa Oloruntoba, a graduate of Bowen University  (2017)

 

2. Favorite posting, and why?:

O&G

I enjoyed the morning reviews and working with my senior colleagues. 

They made things so easy despite the fact that I was in a stressful unit as the only House Officer. 

I also had enough time to do other things I wanted to do (like blogging, cooking healthy meals etc)

 

3. Least favorite posting, and why?:

Surgery

 Surgery posting was extremely stressful. 

I didn’t even have the time to go to church and I spent almost everyday  in the hospital. I also didn’t like the fact that I couldn’t really plan my day without any interruption.
4. Best call(s) ever:

The calls I prayed about, telling God the specific number of patients I wanted to see and got my request.

 

5. Worst call ever:

One Gynae emergency call. That night was really eventful.

I was so scared but my chief Dr Sule, was calm and brave all through. 

One lesson I learnt from that call is how to be calm yet brave enough to face my fears and handle situations to the best of my ability while awaiting help. 

 

6. Nicest Chief(s) I worked with:

 Most of my chiefs were actually nice.

However there are some that I will not forget too quickly:

  • O and G posting: Dr Awolumate and Dr Akinro
  • Paediatrics posting: Dr Owa
  • Internal medicine posting: Dr Palma
  • Surgery posting: Dr Aduloju, Dr Ibrahim and Dr Ogoji 

 

7. Most admirable consultant:

Dr Temitope ODI (Consultant Paediatric Surgeon). 

Though I didn’t really know (or work with) him, but the inspirational speech he gave at our sendforth dinner told me a lot about him. An Empathetic Christian doctor who isn’t just out to make money but to make a difference. 

 

8. Most likely specialty, and why?:

Geriatrics. 

I just have this love for elderly people and I feel the way our health system is currently designed doesn’t really suit them 

i.e. the Nigerian healthcare system is NOT old-people friendly. 

Like Children, they have special needs and peculiarities that should be properly addressed. 

Many of these elderly men and women gave their youthful years in one form of service or the other to the nation, therefore they should benefit from good health care.

 

9. Most unlikely specialty, and why not?:

 

Surgery. 😱😱😱

That posting was too stressful.  Abeg!

And their wahala as a department was just too much (a department of numerous rules and regulations !)

I do love the practical aspect of surgery, but the unfair treatment I saw our senior colleagues (residents) go through was not funny.  I can’t live my life like that jare

 

10. Three life lessons from housejob:

 

i. Be brave enough to face your fears. 

ii. There is a thin line between life and death and as a doctor you may be the one with the pencil that will draw that line or the eraser that will clean it off. 

iii. Build Relationships, nurture them and cherish them.

11. Most embarrassing moment:

I honestly can’t remember any.

 

12. What are you thankful about:

 – God’s faithfulness in bringing to pass the things he said.

– All the people I met, especially all my teachers and colleagues.

– I am specially thankful for the new friends I have now. I didn’t really have a lot of friends before HouseJob but God gave me friends who are now my sisters. Hallelujah!

The 3 Musketeers❤️


 

13. Longest day ever:

Day ke? Dayssss… My entire SCBU posting!

 

14. Happiest day ever:

The day I saw my Primaries* result.

 

15. Something to miss:

  • The chiefs who were like older siblings to me. Those ones I could have a conversation with conveniently anytime.
  • My darling friends.
  • Weekend trips to Mount Patti (Fitfam Adventure☺️)

16. Rate your housejob experience on a scale of 1-5:

4/5 

 

17. Call food: Yay or Nay? 

Indifferent 

 

18. New skills learnt: 

Quite a number. 

 

19. Unforgettable patient

One patient in general surgery who had surgeries up to 3 times, due to complicated perforated typhoid Ileus, I think… Well, she is alive doing well!

There was another woman in Gynae ward who had a cancer. She is now late though.

20. Any regrets? 
None that I can think of.

 

21. Favorite mantra:

This too shall pass.

 
22. Shout out to 3 friends you made during house job: 

(Hian…3 is too small ooo!)

 

Debby– She opened her room to me for the entire period. It means so much to me and I just can’t thank her enough. 

She chose to be my friend and treated me like her sister. I love all the lovely moments we shared together gisting, going out etc

She taught me how to take care of my natural hair, and tried her best to bring me out of my shell 😉

Debby, God bless you dear🤗

Deby and I.

 

Eunice– She encouraged me to start my blog the first time I had a conversation with her. 

She is also motherly, caring, and a no-nonsense person. 😬


Ifeoluwa Yes, me! 😂 For sticking with me throughout the one year despite all my plenty wahala. For being bold and courageous to take new steps to an amazing new me. 


Baby girl, you’re the best!😘😍❤️
 
23. What next after housejob?

 

NYSC, then others as the Lord leads.

 

24. If not Medicine, then what? 
 

Farming, Catering/Baking. (Yes, I’m a foodie😅)

25. What’s more important for a House Officer, skill or stuff? 

Both. 

Stuff without skill is useless because the stuff will not transform to an intervention all by itself without appropriate application.

And skill without stuff makes one look like a gambler just trying something just to see if it will work or not, and if it does work, applying it to everyone that comes forgetting that patient care should be individualized. 

26. Thank you for sharing your Housejob experience.

Thanks for giving me the opportunity 😀. 

*Primaries: An exam written to enter into the residency program. 
 

***


Editor’s Note:

Dr Sarah (a.k.a Sarah Baby 😍), is my warm and wise friend-turned-sister, a chef of life and destiny (she can cook for Africa😂), budding blogger and a fellow believer in Christ. 

One of the most inspiring people I met during housejob. I really believe our meeting was not ordinary, God had a hand in it. 

Beneath her calm exterior is a depth with several stories of her journey with God, and an emphasis on his faithfulness and constant love. 

A foodie, lover of God and natural hair enthusiast, she doesn’t just preach her faith, she lives by it. 

Dr. Sarah blogs here.

Thank you for reading!

:::requ1ne:::

     â¤ï¸â¤ï¸â¤ï¸

HouseJob Chronicles: Finding the Work-Life Balance As A Female Doctor.

What is the most important factor for a female doctor to consider in the choice of a speciality?

– The God-factor.

***

Q1. Can we meet you ma’am?

A: I’m Dr (Mrs) Olabisi Yeye-Agba.

Q2. Why Medicine?

A: Medicine was my childhood dream, we had a family doctor that I greatly admired as a child; but more importantly, I believe God wanted me to study Medicine, so he brought that opportunity my way.

Q3. What does Medicine mean to you: A Calling, a Passion or a Career?

A: It’s primarily a calling because it involves taking care of the whole man: the spirit, the soul and the body.

And the satisfaction is also three-fold: your patients are happy, you’re fulfilled and God is pleased.

Q4. What unique challenges do you experience as a female doctor?

A: If I’m to be honest, the medical field especially in Nigeria, is not a level playing ground between male doctors and female doctors.

In our environment, the average person still sees a man in the traditional role of a doctor and a woman in the role of a nurse.

Q5. Can you share some of your favorite moments as a Wife/Mother and Doctor?

A: What really makes my day is the heartfelt gratitude and prayers from the patients I attend to.

A happy patient makes a happy doctor.

I also love seeing results. 

Whenever I give treatment or perform procedures on patients with significant improvement, I’m so happy.


Then the encouragement and support I get from my spouse (who is also a doctor btw) is amazing. 

He’s my number one fan.

Q6. Is it really possible to have a Work-Life balance?

A: It is possible. 

But it takes the support and understanding of the people around you (both at home and in the workplace) to make it work.

Q7. A lot of female doctors choose not to go into demanding specialities in order to play their traditional roles as Wives and Mothers. What is your take on that?

A: Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom: and with all thy getting, get understanding. Proverbs 4:7

Before you make any decision about your career, pray about it.

For a doctor-doctor relationship (and in any other demanding profession) consider what area your spouse wants to specialize in.

Most importantly, be assured that if God leads you to it, he will see you through it.

Q8. What is the greatest sacrifice you’ve had to make as a female doctor?

A: There are many sacrifices to make as a female medical doctor, especially if you’re married.

Whatever it takes to make your home front work is worth doing.

Mostly you’ll have to sacrifice your time and sleep.

Here are three things you do not want to compromise on as a female doctor:

 Prayer.    Hardwork.    Studying.

Q9. What is the most important factor for a female doctor to consider in the choice of a speciality?

A: The God-factor.

Q10. What advice will you give to female Naija House officers as regards their career prospects?

A: From now, start to enquire of God what he wants of you.

It’s not a must to continue medical practice or even remain in Nigeria. 

God may have other plans for you.

Don’t be satisfied with the status quo, learn to add value to yourself in every area: spiritually, physically, financially, mentally and career-wise.

Prepare yourself for life.

My final charge:

For Wisdom is a defence, and money is a defence: but the excellency of knowledge is, that wisdom giveth life to them that have it.

(Ecclesiastes 7:12)
***


Dr (Mrs) Olabisi Yeye-Agba is a graduate of Olabisi Onabajo University and currently a Senior Resident in the department of Ophthalmology, at Federal Medical Centre, Lokoja.

:::requ1ne:::

*All images are from the Internet.

Musings 1.0|| Hello

Hello there!

It’s been a while, I know.

I really missed this space but life has been happening lately, behind the scenes.

Mostly work, work and more work!

It became so overwhelming at some point that I had to take a break.

This Adulting life no be beans o!

I almost miss the days when I had no job sef. 

But hey, 

We don’t complain, right?

Because…


I would have loved to chill here a little more, but the emergency paediatric unit can be such a marketplace on some days.

My body needs some rest in advance. Lol.

Much love to the paediatricians out there, thank you for all you do!

:::requ1ne:::


HouseJob Chronicles: 5 Ways NOT To Take Things Personal.

Hello People,

I had an experience at work the other day, interesting in retrospect, but very emotional for me at the time. I was hurt by some stuff one of my “Ogas at the top” said, and I ended in tears.

It was so embarrassing…long story short, I came out of the experience a better me.

In this post, I’d like to share a few tips with you about how NOT to take things personal as a House Officer, especially if you work (or plan to work) in Nigeria.

Enjoy!

***

1. Offenses will come.
Offenses are a part of life we all can’t do without. On a daily basis, we offend people and people offend us.

Unfortunately, even in the work-environment where everyone is expected to be cordial, people step on one another’s toes all the time.

As a House Officer, patients will annoy you, your colleagues will make you angry, and your seniors will frustrate you.

The way some patients view medical interns…🙄

Sadly, a lot of Nigerian doctors still see BULLYING as a necessary evil, and unless there’s a change in such mindset, House Officers will continue to be at the receiving end.

It’s in your own best interest to develop a thick skin against such scenarios, because they will surely come.

2. Keep Moving On.
No matter how bad a day seems, that day will pass.

Days will turn into weeks, weeks into months, and before you know it, your housejob experience is over.

If you want to survive as a House Officer unscathed, learn to move on quickly!

3. Be Considerate.
Eventually, what goes around comes around.

As a newbie doctor, maybe it’s time to change the narrative.

Be the difference you want to see.

To your patients show empathy. You have no idea what some of them are passing through.

To your colleagues show comradeship. You’re together in the struggle.

To your seniors show loyalty. They were once in your shoes.

It takes a little kindness to make a BIG difference.

In all, do your best and give the quality of care, treatment and respect you want others to give you.

4. Know your elastic limit.

When all is said and done, it is NOT every nonsense that you should allow.

I’m yet to walk out of a ward round, because God has REALLY helped me.

And I hope the day never comes because if it so happens…hehe

Like I say to anyone who cares to listen, I’m the only doctor in my family…I cannot come and die.

For your own sanity, speak up when you MUST.

If a colleague wants to take advantage of you, call such person to order.
If a patient tries to disrespect you, set him/her straight.
And if your seniors verbally or physically abuse you, to an extent that is unhealthy to your self-esteem, please report them to the appropriate quarters.

You’re a doctor, not a door-mat!

5. Laugh out Loud
When all is said and done, someone may just be having a bad day and looking for a channel to vent.

DO NOT become the scapegoat.

Try to to give your best at ALL times. Be timely. Be proactive. Don’t be lazy. Don’t be rude. Know your limits.

Refuse to be a casualty in another person’s mood instability.

And when you’ve done all you can, and someone still wants to make you angry or sad, just LAUGH OUT LOUD.

Image Credit: iStock
Laugh so hard that it confuses your “Tormentor.”

A little humor can really go a long way!

Remember, you’re STRONGER than you think.

Source: WEB

For me, whenever I start to feel overwhelmed by the sheer stress of the job, the Holyspirit gently reminds me that…

So I don’t complain, I give thanks.

***

I screen grabbed this from a friend’s status the other day. Truly this job Issa calling! 

Last, last, all of us will be ALRIGHT. 

….
Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::

    ❤️❤️❤️

HouseJob Chronicles: The Journey So Far!

So yours truly is half-way done with this housejob thing. Yay!

Throwback to my Med school graduation shoot

I recently completed my second posting: INTERNAL MEDICINE.

Let’s just say the posting was more of presentations and the likes, than anything else. 

Internal medicine doctors like to brag about their “stuff”, unlike the surgeons who love “action” and just want to get a knife under your skin. To their credit, the internists seem to spend more bedside time with their patients.

The longest ward round of my life (about 5 hours) was during my internal medicine rotation and it was not funny. 

Photo credit: WEB
 

I spent my entire posting in the Endocrinology unit where about 90% of our patients had diabetes. 

Some Diabetic cases were really bad especially those complicated with Diabetic Foot Syndrome (DMFS) and we lost a number of them, sadly. 

Still there were more successes than defeats and for that I’m thankful.

The importance of patient education and regular health checks cannot be overemphasized because without those complications, Diabetes is pretty manageable. 

I’m especially thankful that God kept me through those 12 weeks of ward rounds, emergency room calls and outpatient clinic activities. I had some tough days as well as a few long nights. 

I’m glad I was able to make friends with my colleagues, seniors, nurses and even a few patients. The Unit Consultants and Residents were also kind and helpful.

I’m especially thankful for my unit partner, Dr. M. He made my life easier in so many ways and he took the bulk of the work on days when the unit was really busy. He really deserves some accolades😂

L-R: Dr. M, myself, Dr. Tony, Dr. Esther (in front), Dr. Palma (behind), Dr. Eugene and Dr. Nonso.

I’ve since resumed a new posting (Obstetrics/Gynecology), and I’m gonna be seeing lots of preggos and cute newborns  over the next couple of  weeks.

Unfortunately, more than half of the hospital staff are currently on a National strike (that excludes doctors), so I’m yet to do some of the cool things I’ve heard about like taking deliveries or repairing episiotomies. 

Tbh…can’t wait for the strike to be over (the holiday is enough). Learning is still important to me, abeg.

Here are some of the highlights of my Housejob experience:

1. Being called a Doctor

It does feel good to be officially addressed as a doctor. I know I feel entitled but who wouldn’t?

After the stress of medical school and MDCN licensing exam, I know I paid my dues so I deserve some accolades sorry, the title😉

With Dr. Tony

So it’s kinda annoying when that random patient or patient’s relative refers to me as a nurse. Maka gini?

I know it’s not a crime to be called a nurse but I think it’s an identity theft, to answer to a title that is false 😉

On days when I have the strength, I sharply correct such erring individuals, while on other days I just roll my eyes and let it slide.

2. Call food struggle 

You know how many Nigerians love awoof (free things)? Let’s just say that the doctors are no exception. 

Although our call food is not exactly free, since a monthly deduction is made from our salaries, still it feels good to have ready-to-eat meals at work.

And don’t let it surprise you that we sometimes go for extra helpings and even lobby for call food on days when we are not on call…because doctors love food like that.

A couple of times, the taste of the food can be so disappointing (more like crappy), still we try to make the most use of it.
I’d rather go for my own home cooked meal than call food any day, but on days when I don’t have a choice, I’m thankful for call food. 

3. Patients who L.A.M.A

To L.A.M.A is to Leave Against Medical Advice 

This has be to one of my favorite scenarios as a house officer. 

I know it sounds selfish but it simply means there’s one less patient to worry about. 

Medical ethics emphasizes a patient’s power of autonomy, in other words, no doctor can force a patient to make any decision concerning his/her health. 

As doctors we are trained to assess the benefit to risk ratio of our treatment plan, and only go ahead if the benefit outweighs the risk. 

In a situation where patients (or their relatives), refuse a particular treatment due to financial incapacity, religious/cultural beliefs or preference for alternative care, they are allowed to leave against medical advice.

In one of my Consultant’s words, “The hospital is not a prison yard and we can’t force you to get treated.”

Occasionally, some patients who L.A.M.A eventually return in worse condition. It’s very tempting to send them away, but as doctors we have no choice but to treat them anyway.

4. ER Memoirs

The Emergency room is one of the toughest places for a doctor to be in, especially during call hours. Call hours usually last from 4 p.m. till 8 a.m. the next day.

The experience ranges from days of having a sleep-over (like no patient to disturb you all night) to days of little or no sleep. 

Photo credit: WEB

One of the worst scenarios is to be told to prepare an unstable patient for an emergency surgery around 2 a.m., another scenario is having to monitor glucose levels, for a diabetic patient in Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State (HHS) every hour.
In such scenarios you can’t help but philosophize:

Tough times never last, but tough people do.” Robert Schuller.

Count yourself lucky if you are able to catch a wink before morning, because you’re mandated to be on your feet again, running errands till closing hours. 

Still we don’t COMPLAIN, we give thanks.

5. Patients’ stories 

If we look past the sick faces, investigation results, the diagnosis, the prognosis, and all other medical jargon, we realize that there is more to our patients than meets the eye.

That patient who just had a cholecystectomy is someone’s husband, father, brother, uncle, boss or mentor. 

The lady who was just diagnosed with diabetes is someone’s daughter, neighbor, student or friend.

I’ve heard all sort of stories that break my heart and many times I wonder why God allows some people to pass through so much pain.

I once had a patient who was involved in a nearly fatal road traffic accident, in which she broke a leg, a few weeks to her wedding. Thankfully she survived the ordeal, but her life was never the same again. 

Another patient, a father of three, struggling to make ends meet, was diagnosed with chronic kidney disease and had to be placed on regular hemodialysis. How the family could even afford the treatment remains a mystery to me.

Life seems to momentarily stand still when sickness comes knocking, but the truth is there’s so much going on behind the scenes. 

A diagnosis is enough to change the course of a person’s life and only faith in God that can keep such a person going. 

Miracles do happen. And I’ve seen a number of them. 

I believe as doctors, we will show more empathy if we routinely put ourselves in our patients’ shoes. 

So help us God.

***

– call food: the food served when a doctor is on call duty.

Cheers,
:::requ1ne:::

     â¤ï¸â¤ï¸â¤ï¸

HouseJob Chronicles: A Surgery Resident’s Profile.

An interesting aspect of housejob for me, is getting to meet senior colleagues from various backgrounds, with unique personalities and a wide-range of interests in the medical field. 

As part of the HouseJob Chronicles series, I’ll be featuring some residents from my centre (FMCL) who will give insights about the expectations and demands of residency (in Nigeria).

Enjoy!
***

“A good doctor cares. He cares about his patients. He’s not necessarily the doctor with the greatest knowledge, [but] he is empathic and shows compassion.”

– Dr. Fola Aduloju.


Q1. Why Surgery?

Dr. Fola: I’ve always loved the idea and I’ve always been fascinated by it. I studied medicine because I wanted to be a surgeon. Apart from that, surgery is physically and mentally challenging and I loved that too. Also, surgery is very lucrative. I also like the fact that surgeons don’t rely on medications alone, they identify the problem and take it out or fix it. Even the best of surgeons would need the services of another surgeon if he has a surgical problem… he won’t operate on himself, meaning that surgeons will always be sought after.
Lastly, I love the the theater environment.

Q2. What does a fulfilled day look like for you?

Dr. Fola: As a resident, a fulfilled day for me is one in which I have successfully balanced service rendering, academic activity, family life and rest. One hardly experiences a fulfilled day as a surgery resident. There always something that gives for another. This might be different for other residents though

A Surgery Resident’s Profile
Q3. What keeps you going on tough days?

Dr Fola: On tough days, I remind myself that this was the path I chose for myself and I won’t let temporary circumstances derail me. I keep my eyes on the prize and get going. “No pain, no gain.”

Q4. Do you have a favorite mantra? Please share.

Dr. Fola: No favorite mantra, sorry. Lol

Q5. What’s the most life-changing lesson you’ve learnt as a doctor?

Dr. Fola: Life is ephemeral and one must value every day and maximize it like it’s the last. 

There’s a thin line between life and death.

Q6. If not medicine, what?

Dr. Fola: Aviation. I would most definitely become a pilot. That was my first love before the idea of becoming a surgeon came.

Q7. What are your favorite activities outside work?

Dr. Fola: I love reading about music theory, drawing and painting, programming and foreign languages. Unfortunately most of these are time consuming and residency won’t permit. So instead, I just watch TV and sleep when I have the chance.

Q8. How do you keep your “work-life” balance?

Dr. Fola: It’s difficult in surgery. The demands are enormous and time consuming. A surgery resident would always be skewed towards work. When there is opportunity, I hang out with friends and keep myself up to date with happenings.

A Surgery Resident’s Profile

Q9. What are the attributes of a good doctor?

Dr. Fola: A good doctor cares. He cares about his patients. He’s not necessarily the doctor with the greatest knowledge, [but] he is empathic and shows compassion. 

Of course, he hungers for knowledge to improve the quality of patient care.

Q10. What advice will you give to a Naija House Officer?

Dr. Fola: Naija House officers should know that the work environment is harsh and stressful. They should find ways of simplifying their tasks and reducing the stress. In other words, they should work smart.

Most importantly, they should consider getting licensed to practice in other places irrespective of their love to practice in Nigeria. This will give them more exposure and possibly better finance to have an independent and comfortable practice. There are things one does when one is younger, do them now. Lastly, they should go after skills acquisition and thirst after knowlege/self-improvement.

***

Dr. Fola Aduloju, is a graduate of University of Ilorin Medical School, and a Surgery Resident at Federal Medical Centre, Lokoja, Nigeria. He is interested in Neurosurgery specialty. 


Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::

    ❤️❤️❤️