MARCH|| Favorite Things Tag.

I know I’ve been AWOL for the last few weeks.

Among other happenings, let me just say:

1. Housejob has been HARD!

2. Lokoja heat is really oppressive.

But I’m not here to whine.

Because for this job, I prayed

Also the scripture tells me that

“The LORD is my shepherd; I have EVERYTHING I need.”
Psalms 23:1 GNB

Emphasis on Everything.

God knows I have so many wants, but he so graciously meets my needs…every time.

Without further delay, let’s get into the TAG thingy:

1. EARLY MORNING|| Shower 🚿 or Bubble Bath 🛀 ?
Shower. I’d love one right now.

2. TEMPERATURE|| Sunshine 🌞 or Rain 🌧?
Rain…minus thunder, lightning and flooding.

3. ON A CHILLY DAY|| Coffee ☕️ or Tea ☕️?
Coffee…nothing beats the smell and taste of coffee. And no, I’m not an addict.

4. FOR FUN|| Book 📖 or Tv 📺?
Book…aka Bookworm.
Anywhere. On the couch. On the toilet seat. Under a tree. In the car.
Anytime. While Eating. While chatting.
Paperback or Ebook? Are you kidding me? Ebook ofcourse.

5. TRAVEL|| Road trip 🚘 or Flight ✈️ ?
Flight…it’s an amazing feeling to be up in the clouds and over the ocean…plus there’s something about the flight meals, I just can’t resist them😂

6. ACTIVITIES|| Indoor 🏡 or Outdoor⛷?
Indoor…homebody in the morning, afternoon and night. If I had a choice, I’ll happily work from home.

7. FOOTWEAR|| Heels 👠 or Flats 👟?
Flats…Excuse me, who heels epp 😏??

8. MUSIC|| Rock n Roll 🎧 or Reggae 🎤?
Reggae. Let’s just say I’m my Father’s daughter😉

9. SHOPPING|| Malls 🏤 or Open Stalls 🗽?
Malls…I love to window shop and people-watch, and I dislike the typical Naija market stress and endless bargains, no strength biko. I don’t mind paying an extra penny for my convenience.

10. SWIMMING|| Pool 🏊 or Beach 🏖?
Beach…all the way, baby. I love the freedom the beach offers and oh, those waves are delicious or something like that.

So I’d have loved to tag a handful of people but I’ll keep it open to everyone who is interested. 



HELLO 2018!

Welcome on board guys, I’m so glad we all crossed over to the new year.

I don’t know about y’all, but this new year has been amazing so far. God is good.
So this post is a kinda review for 2017, (and I literally copied and edited the format from here).

It’s gonna be a “longish” read, so fasten your seat belts and LET’S ROLL!

1. What did you do last year that you had never done before?
Huh…Attended a Driving school.

2. Did you keep your new year resolutions and will you make more this year?


From saving in a piggy bank (cashed a little above 14k late November), to publishing MY FEGGO DIARIES, to committing some verses of the scripture to memory, took two creative writing courses, among others. 

So I look forward to not only more resolutions, but more goals and growth this year. Amen.

3. Did anyone close to you give birth?

Yes o. I have two new beautiful nieces.

Ehm…no pics to share, sorry.

4. Did anyone you know die?
Sadly, yes.

I wrote this poem in memory of a family friend who died towards the end of last year:

“It’s a very sad night,
For all the lives you touched
You had a heart of gold,
And gave a smile of hope
Because of what you gave,
Our lives were so enriched
And although you’re no more,
The lives you touched remain.”

5. What new place(s) did you visit last year?

Nnewi, Anambra State….well, it was such an EXPERIENCE (one I won’t be forgetting in a hurry). The culture, the lifestyle, the language, the food…everything was so different.

6. What would you like to have this year that you didn’t  last year?

My dream Camera!  📷

Hello Sophia, can’t wait to meet you. 😍😍😍

7. What date in 2017 will remain etched in your memory?

July 13th, 2017. My MDCN induction date.

8. What was your biggest achievement in 2017?

Again, my MDCN induction.

9. What was your biggest failure?
Ehm, Failing out of driving school. 😩

10. Did you suffer any illness or injury?

Yes…a minor RTA leaving behind an annoying scar on my left knee and recurrent tooth pain. I’m thankful I survived though. 

11. What was the best thing you bought?
Well…can’t think of a specific BEST thing atm.

12-13. Skipped.

14. Where did most of your money go?
Easy…MTN Data/Airtime😂

15. What did you really, really get excited about?

Getting a HOUSEJOB. Whoop!💃💃💃

16. What song will always remind you of 2017?

“You’re the reason why I lift my hands, why I lift my voice, why I sing to you…”

17. Compared to this time last year, are you happier or sadder?

Definitely happier.

2017 was a good year, but this year started on a “lighter” note.

18. Thinner or Fatter?

5kg Fatter😌😢

19. Richer or Poorer?

Richer. Glory to God, I now earn my pay😎

20. What do you wish you had done more of?

Prayed more. Read more. Loved more. Served God more.

21. What do you wish you had done less of?

Most importantly…Worried less.

22-25. Skipped.

26. What were your favorite TV Programs in 2017?

Let’s see…TINSEL, BATTLE GROUND and JEMEJI. Thanks to AMShowcase, I watched them back to back.😉

27. Skipped.

28. What was the best book you read?

FERVENT (Priscilla Shirer), closely followed by UNSTOPPABLE (Christine Caine), I read both twice last year and I look forward to re-reading them.

29. Greatest musical discovery:

Does Nathaniel Bassey’s Wonderful Wonder count?

30. What did you want and get?

Haha…plenty things, a New pair of glasses. Some New clothes. New shoes. New handbags…and a Wig!😉

31. What did you want and not get?

Top on my list, a Driver’s license.😩

32. Best Movie you watched in 2017?

Well…OMUGWO was the most interesting. 

33. How did you celebrate your last birthday?

In the THEATRE, pulling some Orthopaedic stunts!

34. How would you describe your personal fashion concept in 2017?

On a scale of 1 to 10, a 6? Tbh, I improved as per my hairdo and make-up💋, even the heavens can testify.😄

35. What kept you sane in 2017?

Music…lots and lots of worship music!

36. Celebrity Figure Crush in 2017:

Nonso Bassey
(“Man’s too hot”)🙆

37. Skipped.

38. Who was the best new person you met?

Quite a number faa. From my FaithRest Fam (Mamma, Dolapo, Ife, Pelumi et al…) to fellow HOs (Comfort, Osas, Ameh et al…)

39. Most Valuable Life Lesson(s) From 2017:

  • (1) If God says it, he will do it. His PROMISE, His TIMING, His METHOD.
  • (2) Life takes TIME.
  • (3) Contentment is the presence of JESUS,  not the absence of challenges. 

40. Quote a song lyrics that sums up your 2017:

WONDERFUL WONDER (Nathaniel Bassey)
“Everywhere I go
I see You right there
In the beauty of nature
You shine all around,
For You are everything
And everything is You,
Precious Jesus
Oh wonderful wonder you are.”


That’s ALL folks.

I hope we all can journey into this NEW YEAR with greater Joy, Hope and Peace.

Cheers to an Awesome 2018 Experience,


Housejob Chronicles- Coping Mechanisms!

Hello Everybody,


And I’m glad even though it doesn’t really feel like Christmas around me.

While everyone else was busy planning special activities for this Yuletide season, my routines were pretty much the same.

Sleep, wake up, go to work, sleep, wake up, go to work…” 

Everything else from cooking to cleaning get lumped into each day. 

I’ve really missed my very organized self. 😢

There are days I don’t even have the time to eat one proper meal. No kidding.

On such days I’m doubly thankful for Coca-Cola. 

It’s an essential tool for preventing hypoglycemic shock.😉

So my birthday was a couple of days ago and among other things, I’m thankful for God’s MERCY. He is the reason I’m still STANDING.

The latter part of this year has been trying for me spiritually (erratic with no functional church, dusty bible syndrome et al),  but his MERCIES kept me. So the song on replay for my birthday was this:

I won’t even lie, my last few postings have been increasingly hectic. I just switched from Orthopaedic to Neurosurgery, and every other day there’s at least one RTA patient waiting for me in the Emergency ward. 

At several points, I almost broke down (Physically and Mentally) and there were days I found myself in tears (I know, “too much water” in my tear glands..haha). In the midst of all that, God has been teaching me some vital lessons for this season which I’d like to share:  


This sounds obvious right? if only you know how hard it can get. 

Everyday feels like a marathon as I try to race against time (I can still hear my Reg’s voice, “IPR starts by 7:00am”. Yet I’m in the hospital till after 10 p.m. on some days even when I’m not on CALL but that’s no excuse not to have a quality time with GOD (my Father): who is the Source and Centre of it all. 

From my experience, the less I pray, the more irritable, tired, anxious, distracted and restless I get.

Pray as if your life depends on it, because it does.

I’m learning among other things, to:

– Pray for MYSELF, my COLLEAGUES, other CO-WORKERS and especially my PATIENTS.

– Pray for the WISDOM, COURAGE and STRENGTH to face the challenges that each day brings. 

– Pray for the PATIENCE to deal with trying circumstances, irate patients, annoying co-workers and every other kind of evil that the enemy wants to bring my way.

– Pray that I’m a BLESSING to my Team and not a BURDEN to them. I don’t want to be labeled as a Lazy, Undisciplined, or Disorganized Doctor. 

*IPR: Intern’s Pre-round.


This is soooo important. 

I recall one day, I was so physically exhausted while running some errands, that some nurses around took time to lecture me about the importance of taking proper care of myself. 

When all is said and done, there will always be patients. But I’ll only be here for a season. 

Wisdom teaches me that to give my best, I have to build stamina. Because I can’t give what I don’t have. 

So these days, when I find myself getting worked up, I take a break. 

When I’m hungry, I eat. When I’m tired, I rest. 

A hungry Doctor, is an angry Doctor. A sleepy Doctor, is a snappy Doctor. It’s that simple.


Your Friends and Family are especially important during this Housejob phase. 

It’s easy to become so consumed with the work that you don’t have the time to reach out to others. 

I know this because I’ve been there. 

It’s even more tough when you have a significant other who is not in the same location with you. 

So here’s a suggestion that works for me (It’s called the PTCV Principle):

  • Pray for them always.
  • Text whenever you miss them.
  • Call when you have the chance. 
  • Visit when there’s the opportunity.


Housejob isn’t beans. I’m sure you know that by now.

And if you’re like most people, you just want it to END already. So you can move on with your life. 

Before you know what’s happening, the days have turned into weeks, the weeks into months and the year is over.

Of course you don’t want that year to be spent merely seeing patients that are anicteric, acyanotic, afebrile, not pale , well hydrated and without pedal edema. 😅

That’s why you must be INTENTIONAL about everything you do on a daily basis. 

I’m often reminded that if I want to make a difference, the time is NOW.


No matter how tough a day is, you can always find time and creative ways to enjoy it. For me that includes:

  • Reading a good book.
  • Eating a good meal. 
  • Listening to uplifting music.
  • Hanging out with friends 
  • Watching a funny movie 

And of course connecting with patients and co-workers

You don’t know how much you have in common with others until you’re willing to have casual conversations with them. 

I’ve made a number of acquaintances with people who speak my local dialect, share my first name or birthday, similar beliefs and the likes. 

It’s an AMAZING something!


Again, it’s MERRY Christmas from me to you.

I hope y’all don’t forget the REASON for the celebration- Christ’s BIRTH!

Here’s my all-time favorite Christmas song: 



HouseJob Chronicles: What School Did You Finish From?

Hey folks,

First of all, this post is long over due. I’ve being working on the draft since like forever and even abandoned it at some point, cos no time.

So I have had a crazy few days post-leave. I’m so stressed out that I could use another break! Lol.

My face during Intern’s Pre-round…lol

I’m just glad I got to publish this, at last!

The post is especially for, but not limited to the Foreign Trained Doctors (FTDs).

My “brothers and sisters” from the diaspora, welcome back to REAL LIFE- Naija Version!

I’m sending you thousands of cyber hugs that will last you through the first few months of your House Job at least.

If you’ve passed through the MDCN hurdles already, you’d have observed that the system is NOT ready to welcome you with open arms. I’m not even kidding…

If you’re one of those patriotic FTDs (I’m not one btw🙄), who returned with high hopes of contributing your skills and expertise to the expansion of Naija’s health sector; I’m sorry to burst your bubble:

Whatever fancy reasons you had for returning to Naija, no one cares.

It is a sad reality.

But for what it’s worth, there are some great moments too. Like having patients discharged after spending days/weeks in the hospital or hearing an uncooperative patient Left Against Medical Advice (LAMA)…lol. I should do a separate post on that.


So once you start your house job, expect to feel intimidated by your seniors. Naija doctors love to move STUFF. Eeesh!!

The million-dollar question that got my fellow interns tongue-tied, like we weren’t expecting it…lol! 

It wasn’t a funny scenario but I can laugh it off now.

The “Ogas” at the top love to deliberate on which is the best medical school in Naija, so they keep setting baits for house officers in form of questions, sane or otherwise.

Whether you are foreign trained or locally, you’ll experience this at some point or the other, although the former seem to be more at the receiving end.

Having passed through the initiation process of getting asked the same question multiple times, I have a few tips for upcoming House Officers:

1. OWN your identity.


So wear it like a cape. Be PROUD of it, because it’s who you are.

Embrace it. Love it. Live it.

If you schooled abroad, it was your decision, your money (whether sponsored or not) and your experience. Ditto if you were locally trained.

Even if studying Medicine was a mistake, it was the best mistake of your life.
Don’t let anyone guilt-trip you on it.
2. You have NOTHING to prove.

You heard that right.

There’s NOTHING to prove to anybody.

Not your skills. Not your knowledge. Not your personality.

What you know was enough to get you to this level. And if you build on your knowledge and skills, you can (and will) get better.

Remember, your senior colleagues (Regs, SRs, Consultants) did not get all their medical expertise during their housemanship year.

They earned it with time. Life takes time. 

So while there’s always room for improvement, you have NOTHING to prove.

Remember this.

3. Do it with JOY!

When all is said and done, what really matters is the impact you made wherever you find yourself.

So whatever you do, do it with EXCELLENCE. And COURAGE. And JOY.

Give the kind of care you would like to receive.

Put in your very best at all times, even when it’s hard. It’s okay to feel out of place sometimes but don’t let anyone (not even yourself) hold you back.



I’ve asked myself this question a couple of times, and tried to answer it as sincerely as possible:

My answer is YES.

And to add to that, given similar circumstances in the current Naija, I’d still study abroad and maybe the very school I attended. Tenkiu!



Disclaimer: All images unless otherwise tagged, were obtained from the WEB.


During my undergraduate days, I had a classmate who often requested for my “jotter” a few days to our exams. According to him, I knew how to summarize and simplify my notes in such a way that anyone reading would understand. And I believe he had a point.

The first I heard of a learning model was from a friend, a couple of years back. He enlightened me on the difference between VISUAL and AURAL learners, and encouraged me to apply that to how I studied. Unfortunately, I didn’t give it much attention at that time.

Many years later, I would come across the V.A.R.K model of learning and found it quite enlightening.

In any classroom setting, from elementary level to postgraduate level, students receive, retain and retrieve information in different ways. And I believe medical students especially, would benefit from knowing how the learning models work since there’s so much to cover and so little time.

According to the VARK model, there are four types of learners:

1. VISUAL Learners.

I call them “The Scanners.”

These are the model students, especially in a traditional school setting. They don’t just read to comprehend, but seem to possess the so-called “Photographic Memory” and can reproduce the pages of their lecture notes or textbooks, word for word (sometimes with particular page numbers, no kidding!).

They enjoy studying long and hard, retaining most of the information they come across. They especially do well with Charts, Graphs and other Pictorial aids.

One morning while in medical school, we were having a discussion on the ward, and one of my colleagues was asked a question. When he started talking, it was as though an encyclopedia had been opened inside his brain. He just kept stating all the facts and figures while the rest of us gaped…lol.
Afterwards, our consultant looked at him and smiled, stating that he had a photographic memory and she knew he could actually picture the things he was saying. Needless to say, that colleague of mine was one of the smartest students in medical school.

2. AURAL Learners.

Aural learners are also known as AUDIO learners but I prefer to call them “The Crammers.

These are the students who simply pay attention during classes (with/without taking notes) and retain most of the information long afterwards. Some simply “Memorize and Recite” (i.e. CRAM) their notes and they are good to go.
Unlike the VISUAL learners, they don’t really need to study for long, although having group discussions are of great benefit. Still, a lot of them do well with last minute studying.

I had a roommate who would memorize several pages of her notes on the morning of an exam, and her results usually came out so well.
Another friend of mine who is now a doctor, said she only needed to attend (and listen well) in class, and without further reading, she would be able to sit for any exam. When I heard that, my respect for her grew by several inches…haha.

If I’m being honest I doze off or day-dream during classes more times than I’d like to admit. Long lectures are like music to my ears, and I often start drifting off before I catch myself.

3. READ & WRITE Learners.

I call them “The Stenographers.

This kind of learners love to copy everything that is said during a lecture. They afterwards go home to “READ and DIGEST” their notes, often breaking the notes into simpler and condensed versions to understand them better.

Such learners also appreciate Highlights, Mnemonics, Power Points and Summaries. Their goal is to be able to comprehend the material in its simplest form.

I happen to belong to this category of learners. I’m a COPIER by default and the only way I remember things (from class and especially in church) is by taking down notes. Even when there’s nothing to write, I doodle in my notebook, else my mind wanders off.

I remember one time a lecturer gave an impromptu test, immediately after his lecture, and I barely passed though I was sitting right there in the class. The reason was simple, I did not have enough time to “process” the information he had given before the test. In such scenarios, I rely more on residual knowledge.

For me, reading, then writing down notes, enhances comprehension. And if I’m reading something I don’t understand, I try to look it up, otherwise, I skip it.


I call them “The Demonstrators.

When it comes to learning, they are more practical than theoretically-inclined. These are the so-called Hands-on-Students.

In medical school they find most lectures boring, but rush off to dissect every cadaver that comes into the anatomy lab. When they start their clerkships, they can’t wait to examine every patient, set lines and insert urinary catheters. Ask them to state the differentials for a neck swelling and they draw a blank, but ask them to scrub in for a Thyroidectomy and they jump right in! 

What about HYBRIDS?

I believe most students learn by a combination of two or more of the learning models.

Personally, I learn the most by Association i.e. connecting multiple dots together. So it’s a little bit of what I see, what I hear and most of what I read. I’m not much of a hands-on-learner though. And it usually takes me twice the time my contemporaries take to learn a skill, whether it’s cooking Jollofrice or inserting a Urinary catheter! 😂


Do you know what learning model (or combination) you use the most?




50 Practical Ways To Stay Motivated In Medical School (A Recap):

Here’s a recap of the 50 Practical Ways you can motivate yourself through medical school. Feel free to check the links at the end. 

1. Discover yourself
2. Learn new skills
3. Take online courses
4. Avoid negative self-talk
5. Volunteer
6. Listen to good music
7. Watch Medical Shows
8. Start your own business
9. Keep a journal

10. Keep the end in mind
11. Find a mentor
12. Medical school is just a phase. It won’t last forever.
13. Quitting is not an option.
14. Cultivate healthy friendships

15. Find what works for you and make it work
16. Remember why you started
17. Expectations from Friends and Family
18. Eat healthy
19. Focus on becoming competent vs just getting good grades
20. Listen to podcasts
21. Don’t lose your Passion
22. Set Priorities And Rewards
23. Don’t sweat the small stuff

24. Faith in God
25. Set simple goals and achieve them
26. Be your greatest cheerleader
27. Learn to unwind
28. Volunteer to teach others
29. Seek help when you need it

30. You are not alone
30. Play Stimulating Games
31. Stay Focused
33. Ask Questions
34. Aim For Excellent Grades
35. Enjoy the learning process
36. Think Medicine, Think Prestige
37. Believe you can make a difference
38. Financial Sacrifices And Future Remunerations

39. Don’t Quit
40. Take it one step at a time
41. Start a Countdown
42. Share Your Story
43. Have a bucket list
44. Contribute on Social Media
45. Sleep well
46. Work It Out
47. Meditate
48. Cheer as others win

49. Reflect
50. Live, Learn, Love. Repeat.


50 Practical Ways To Stay In Medical School (Part 1)

50 Practical Ways To Stay In Medical School (Part 2)

– 50 Practical Ways To Stay Motivated In Medical School (Part 3)

50 Practical Ways To Stay In Medical School (Part 4)

50 Practical Ways To Stay In Medical School (Part 5)




50 Practical Ways To Stay Motivated In Medical School (Part 2)

You can read the first part here.

11. Find a mentor.

“Mentorship is about getting to know someone and learning how he or she finds passion in his or her medical career.” writes Marissa Camilon, MD. “As young learners, we are drawn intrinsically to passionate people; whether their energy is shown through lectures, clinical work or even in simple conversations.”

Not only do mentors give advice, provide encouragement, offer insight, and connect you to a wider network; they can actually provide you with the perspective needed to figure out some solutions on your own.

Read more on: The importance of having mentors in medicine.

12. Medical school is just a phase. It won’t last forever. 

Just think of all the hurdles you’ve crossed to get to this stage, the endless tests and exams you had to take before you ever qualified to become a medical student. So is the journey through medical school, it is but a fraction of what lies ahead in your medical career. Stay optimistic!

13. Quitting is not an option. 

“I’m fully aware of how rigorous medical school is, that prepares me to face any challenge during the course of study.” says Adarju, a medical student, who is also a spoken word artiste and a public speaker. Like the famous expression, “When the going gets tough, the tough get going.”

14. Cultivate healthy friendships.

Keeping the right company in medical school not only improves your emotional wellbeing, it also strengthens your focus. Seek like-minded friends who have a similar passion for the journey. They will not only ask to hang out with you for pizza, they will also suggest sleepovers where you can study together for your next Pathology test.

15. Find what works for you and make it work.

“I studied myself, I’m a lecture kind-of-person, I learn more in class than when studying by myself. So I attended more lectures and studied minimally.” says Dr. Popoola.

16. Remember why you started.

For some it was the admiration for the likes of famous Neurosurgeon, Dr. Ben Carson, while for others it was simply a deep-seated desire to make a significant difference in their community. Whatever your motive was for applying to medical school, don’t allow the pressure from the workload to kill your dream.

Read Ben Carson’s story here.

17. Expectations from Friends and Family.

When you have a great relationship with those who believe in your dreams and want you to excel, not only does their flow of support (whether through uplifting words, cash or gifts) boost your morale; you also do not want to let them down, which motivates you to even go the extra mile. Your support network can be your greatest cheerleaders while in medical school, and also for a lifetime. “There’s no one in this world who believed in me like my mum did, even when I didn’t believe in myself or my performance in tests or exams. She was just exceptional.” says Dr. Tamie.

18. Eat healthy. 

It’s no news that a lot of medical students barely have enough time to grab a cup of coffee, before they hit the ground running; And because of their fast-paced schedule, they mostly survive on fast food and energy drinks. The truth however, is that it takes a healthy medical student to become a healthy medical doctor, and a balanced diet not only increases your physical stamina, it also enhances your mental capacity.


19. Focus on becoming competent rather than just getting good grades. 

While good grades are important for you to graduate from medical school, you need more than good grades to become a competent doctor. So don’t be depressed because your grades are not so impressive, just keep working hard to become the doctor of your dreams.

20. Listen to podcasts.

Whether you’re interested in purely medical podcasts like EM Basic or you prefer a wider variety of topics such as TEDTalks, listening to podcasts is a good way to keep your motivation coming.

I hope these tips are helpful.




50 Practical Ways To Stay Motivated In Medical School (Part 1)

All medical students need encouragement from time to time; And staying motivated through the rigors of medical school is in itself a challenge.

From my experience and those of other past and present medical students, here are some practical ways to keep the motivation coming through medical school, which I’ll be sharing over the next few weeks.

1. Discover yourself.

As a medical student, you’ve likely spent most of your life in a school environment (Elementary to College); now is the time to not just focus on your schoolwork alone, but also learn about yourself- your purpose, your values and your principles. You’ll be surprised at what you’ll find out.

2. Learn new skills

Medical school opens a world of other interests to you, where you can develop new skills like writing, photography, baking, video editing, or music; plus the Internet offers you great DIY resources.

3. Take online courses.

It is true that you’ve chosen the career path of medicine, but there’s so much you can learn about other fields like the arts, humanities, social sciences or technology. There are a variety of free courses online that you can look into.

Try some courses for free here:

4. Avoid negative self-talk.

There’s enough stress to handle already with the overwhelming work load in medical school and sometimes discouraging grades. It gets worse with putting extra pressure on yourself and criticizing every mistake you make.

5. Volunteer.

Volunteering especially for medical causes (health fairs, blood drives, health awareness campaigns etc) is a good way to feel invaluable while giving back to your community. You don’t have to wait until you graduate before you find some meaning in the medical path.

6. Listen to good music.

Good music is like therapy for your soul. You’ll have some low output days, and rather than allow yourself to sink into depression, why not listen to some cool beats with amazing lyrics? Music is a great tool for internal motivation.

Listen to this inspiring song: I’m a Winner(MTN Project Fame version)

7. Watch Medical Shows.

Medical shows are not only a (fairly good) source of medical information (think terminologies, procedures and diagnosis) and humor, they also fuel your passion for medicine. Grey’s Anatomy, House and Chicago med are a few of them.

8. Start your own business.

Even as a medical student you can become an entrepreneur; apart from the financial renumeration, it also gives you a sense of self-worth and personal satisfaction.

Cake by ADESUWA (A 3rd year medical student)

9. Keep a journal.

Having a journal helps to boost your morale when you reflect on how you overcame a previously challenging time; it also helps you to keep an account of your journey which will be relevant in sharing your experiences in future.

Read: Chronicles of a Student-Doctor (A medical school journal)

10. Keep the end in mind

 “For me it was mostly the thought of being a good doctor (that kept me motivated) says Dr. Johnson, “I was always like someone’s life is going to be in my hands one day and I sure want to be able to save…I don’t want to be the doctor that doesn’t know what she’s doing.”

I hope you find some of the tips helpful, you can let me know some other ways you stay(ed) motivated in medical school.




PS– If you enjoyed this post, you might also enjoy:

– 7 Strategies for studying in medical school

– 5 Tips to reduce stress in medical school

– 7 Lessons from medical school

5 Tips to reduce stress in medical school

It’s no news that scaling through medical school is challenging. Learning how to manage the stress that comes with it, is therefore a necessity.

Like I shared in an older post, a minimal level of stress, called EUSTRESS, is required for proper functioning in everyday life. When it becomes overwhelming however, it is known as DISTRESS which is counterproductive.

In this post, I have shared some tips that worked for me in managing stress as a medical student. I hope you find them helpful. 

1. Start each day with a plan
As a medical student, I usually planned my day using both a to-do-list and a schedule.

 A schedule is like a customized calendar that highlights specific activities for each day, especially those that demand a big chunk of your time (Eg Mondays for shopping, Tuesdays for taking out trash, Wednesdays for laundry, Thursdays for cooking, Fridays for blogging and so on)

A schedule helps you to manage your tasks, so that you can have sufficient time to get each one done, without neglecting others.
A to-do-list helps you to manage your time, so you get to maximize your day and account for every important activity. 

A To-do-list on the other hand, is like a reminder, that lists out everything you want to get done before the day ends. It’s important that you do not overload your To-do-list. As a rule I don’t put more than 10 goals to accomplish on my To-do-list everyday. 
Both are important to monitor your daily productivity, stay balanced and avoid crashing. To maximize them however, you need to apply the priority scale principle. 

(PS: Check this blogpost for what a priority scale is and how to use it).

2. Practice healthy habits

It is true that you become whatever you’re becoming. Work at becoming a healthy doctor. Don’t just preach it, practice it!

You know the rules.

Sleep well. Eat healthy. Exercise. Avoid alcohol. Drink enough water. Shun illicit drugs. Don’t indulge in unsafe sex.

They are quite simple really. But you’d be surprised at how many medical students break most or all of them.

The work is demanding enough, so you can’t afford to break down, not if you can help it.

Learn to take care of your body, so that your body can take care of you.

One simple advice, have your breakfast everyday!!! It’s a great way to avoid energy drain especially during ward rounds.

3. Make time for me-time

In other words, learn to unwind, relax and rejuvenate so that you don’t burn-out.

And if possible, have a “No-Studying Policy” for at least one day in a week. Sundays are perfect! Just take time off to take care of you.

You might like to stay indoors and get refreshed. For instance, I found out that taking a couple of hours at the beginning of the month to have a retreat was spiritually uplifting.
Or maybe you prefer the company of friends, think indoor games, movie nights, beach outings or even a boat cruise! 

And if you’re several miles away from home (like I was), hanging out with your homeys on phone or skype, will go a long way to relieve any tension you might have accumulated over some days. Having your support network (friends and family) around and allowing them to pamper you for a while, when you’re having a bad day is always a blessing. 

4. Attitude is everything

In this path you have chosen, there will be some tough times but you must learn to hang in there.

Learn the 3As of keeping a great attitude: Accept. Adjust. Adapt.

Accept the things you can’t change, adjust the way you respond to challenges and adapt by doing the best you can.

Your motivation is your responsibility. Find out what works for you and use it to your advantage.

As a medical student, I started a blog, practiced meditation and yoga, subscribed to podcasts/blogs, improved on my culinary skills, and read a lot of novels and other non-medical books. There’s an endless list of what you can do too.

5. Take one day at a time.
I can’t over emphasize this part. It’s understandable to think about what’s next after medical school, licensing exams, areas of specialization, and what not. If taken to the extreme however, it does more harm than good. Whenever you find yourself getting overwhelmed, try to declutter your mind and focus on what is right ahead of you – the next class, the next test, the next semester or the next clinical rotation.

Thank you for reading,

If you’ve enjoyed this post, you may also enjoy these:

7 Strategies for studying in medical school

7 Lessons from medical school

 Best wishes,


Hello People,
This is for the Foreign Trained Doctors who want to take the Nigerian Medical Licensing Exam conducted by the Medical And Dental Council Of Nigeria (MDCN).

(Pls note that the exam is applicable to both citizens and non-citizens of Nigeria).
Having successfully participated in the last licensing exam that took place at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), I will share a few helpful tips:

1. Resume the MDCN remedial course early and learn your ropes quickly. The earlier you get settled into the program, the easier it will be for you.
2. Know how to take the routine vital signs (BP, RR, PR) and the normal values across age groups. It’ll likely be your first test, and if you’re on point, you’ll be the BOSS.

3. Be confident and always say what you know. Silence is assumed for ignorance. Even when you’re not sure, just say something.

4. Guys, don’t forget your ties. Without it, you don’t belong on the ward. Come along with your ward coats, scrubs (preferably green if you’ll be in LUTH) and name tags too.

5. Malaria and TB are super high yield. Learn all you can about them beforehand.

6. Revise your history taking and physical examination skills ( especially CVS, RS, ABD and CNS). You’ll be glad you did.

7. Stand TALL, let no one intimidate you. Bad belle people dey Naija. They don’t really like how you went to spend “their” dollars abroad 🙄🙄

8. Don’t go solo, your colleagues will usually know something important that you don’t know.

9. If you could scale through medical school (no matter where you studied) you can survive MDCN. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

Image credit: WEB

10. Pray without ceasing. It is NOT a Joke!


For more information about MDCN, please visit