HouseJob Chronicles: ObGyn Adventures.

I started my ObGyn posting on the first of May.

It was a public holiday (Workers’ day) but a Caesarean section had been booked for a senior colleague’s wife.

The Consultant, the only Female Obstetrician in our Centre, performed the surgery and was assisted by one of the senior residents.

The procedure lasted about an hour but I did not enjoy one bit of it. I told myself right then to keep away from the perineum by all means. 

Also Read: Chronicles of a Student-doctor (ObGyn Posting)

The first few weeks of my posting were strictly spent attending to antenatal cases, thanks to the ongoing JOHESU strike. 

The booking clinic (where a pregnant woman visits the doctor for the first time) runs once a week, while follow-up visits are scheduled based on how far gone the pregnancy is:

GA 12-28 weeks every month

GA 28-36 weeks every 2 weeks

GA 36-40 weeks every week

After the strike was called off, normal activities resumed in the department. 

I started with LABOR WARD Posting and had my first call on a Thursday evening. 

Though it wasn’t too busy, still I worked my butts off, and that became the pattern throughout my stay in the department. 

Every labor ward call I did was a hit from back to back, and it was rare to find the time to catch a nap even for a few hours. 

There were some calls where I had dinner right at my work desk.

I recall a couple of crazy calls where I actually dozed off while clerking patients πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

And how can I ever forget the characteristic odor of liquor?

I hated that smell with a passion. 

It was in ObGyn I discovered my hatred for blood too – especially perineal blood. The smell and sight both made me queasy.

Thankfully most of my calls were uneventful as per mortality. 

 I got to assist in a number of Caesarean sections, which weren’t too exciting, because I lacked the “ginger” and the stamina. 

My best call was with Dr. Ochalla- the most “stressless” chief I worked with. That particular call was a bloody one, and he was very sympathetic with me.

I did my share of (accurate) Vaginal Examinations and attempted a couple of perineal tear repairs. I didn’t get to do an episiorrhaphy per se, as many of the cases I saw were actually bad (with multiple lacerations and PPH) and senior colleagues had to intervene.

Last, last, I didn’t take any delivery by myself. Perhaps the only regret I have in that department.

The other aspect of my ObGyn posting was Gynecology

It was a more enjoyable experience for me.
Many of the patients that presented during my posting and call hours were outpatient cases, so there was minimal stress for me.

One of the traumatic cases I saw was the delivery of a set of previable twins to a severely Ecclamptic woman and watching the second twin die (the first twin was somewhat deformed and had died inutero).

There were a few procedures I assisted with or performed- MVAs, taking Pap smear or ECS

In all my ObGyn posting was a fairly enjoyable one but I was glad when it was over. 

*GA– Gestational Age

*JOHESU– Joint Health Sector Unions

*Ginger– Interest

* ECS– Endocervical Swab

* MVA– Manual Vacuum Aspiration

*All images are from the web.


Also read: HouseJob Chronicles|| The Journey So Far.


And read: HouseJob Chronicles|| PROGRESS.

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HouseJob Chronicles: PROGRESS

Hello everyone!

Guess who just completed her SURGERY Posting? πŸ’ƒπŸ’ƒπŸ’ƒ

Seems just like yesterday when I started this HouseJob thing,

Look at God.


I’m so thankful for the journey so far…the good, the bad, the ugly and the extremely wonderful.

All in all, God favored me.

I worked with some of the most amazing colleagues ever. And I won’t be forgetting my surgery experience in a long, long, time.

Quick breakdown.

So I rotated through 8 (out of 9) units of surgery:

– General Surgery (2 weeks)
– Pediatric Surgery (2 weeks)
– Orthopedics (1 week)
– Plastic/Reconstructive Surgery (2 weeks)
– Neurosurgery (2 weeks)
– Urology (2 weeks)

Total: 11 weeks

Leave: 1 week

On a scale of 1-10, my preferred units were

– Pediatric Surgery (7),
– Urology/Plastic Surgery (6)
and

– Orthopedics (5.5).

Mostly because of the flexibility the units offered, the light workload or the fact that I worked with some of the most benign Residents or Consultants.

I remember when I was a surgeon…lol


Neurosurgery was the best as per clinical skills/acumen but it was quite hectic physically and otherwise.

My General surgery experience was quite hectic too in terms of pressure from superiors. I rotated twice (one week each) and barely survived πŸ˜‚.

Of course, we all know I won’t be specializing in any of the fields of surgery, thanks so much.

***

So here’s my PROGRESS Report 3 months into Housejob:

PS: If you haven’t, please read this post, HouseJob Chronicles- GOALS.

PROGRESS REPORT

Others:

– Assisted in Surgery: 5
– Wound debridement: 1
– Served IM/IV Injections: 6

I’m so PLEASED with myself right now. Well, apart from no acquiring any suturing skills from surgeryπŸ™ˆ Tbh, I didn’t even try to…the entire suturing technique looks like magic to me.

Well, I’m in a new department-Internal Medicine-and I look forward to not just learning new skills but also acquiring lots of Clinical knowledge. So help me God.

Hopefully in another 3 months, I’ll share with you the other feathers I have added to my cap.

Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::
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Housejob Chronicles- 7 Rules For The Naija House Officer!

DISCLAIMER: Shebi you know I’m barely “3 weeks” into this Housejob thing? These are strictly self-made rules o! You don’t need to take them “hook, line and sinker.” Thanking you!πŸ˜…


***
Dear New Naija House Officer,

Congratulations!

I’m so glad you made it.

You worked so hard to get here, spent countless late nights studying in medical school and slaying all the GIANT exams along the way. 

However, there are new hurdles to cross and your “Housemanship” is one of them.

As a newbie Naija house officer, I’ve put together some really simple suggestions to help you get started and maximize the Housejob experience.

1. Apply yourself. I can’t over emphasize this one. 

And it’s a phrase one of my consultants used while having a conversation with me.



Don’t just count your days, make your days count.

Housejob can be so stressful that you’re in a hurry to complete it. If you’re not careful you’ll just keep counting each day that comes without making the most of it.  

2. Don’t be a fraud i.e. Avoid synthesizing stuff that don’t exist. 

Sadly, I have been a victim and it wasn’t funny. The pressure to impress the “Ogas” can be so real, that you begin to generate values for your patient’s vitals, randomly state their clinical status and so on. 

Don’t say/write what you don’t know, even if it makes you look stupid sometimes. Trust me, you will find yourself in such shoes someday. Let your MOTTO be: “Integrity over Impression.”

Whatever you do be you, but always be a PLUS wherever you go.

{Tip: Have a small notepad and a wristwatch to document everything you do for a patient even when you don’t have access to the case note.}

3. Know your lane and respect others.

You’ll meet many nurses, lab scientists, attendants etc and often the respect you give them, is the respect you get back.
Forget the stereotype rumors you’ve heard. There are nice people (doctors, nurses, security etc) everywhere. And nobody is out to get you if you do what you ought to do well.

4. There’s such a thing as “Hierarchy syndrome.” Don’t be caught in the web.

It’s safer to be on the sidelines. Don’t let anyone belittle or intimidate you. Respect your seniors, but don’t fear them. It only destroys your self-esteem.
Sometimes you really want to help your patient but you can’t do much, because you have some “Ogas” at the top that are ready to ridicule you whether for doing nothing, doing too little or doing too much.

5. Learn all you can, while you possibly can.

From unit posting to unit posting, you’ll be surprised at how quickly the time flies. If you don’t make a conscious effort to learn, you won’t learn a thing. The goal of Housejob is for you to gain a level of independence in medical practice. And achieving that goal largely lies on you.

6. Remember, PATIENTS first. They are the priority of any healthcare institution, and they should be your priority too. 

That’s the reason you’re there in the first place.

So in whatever decision you make, ask yourself “what are my patient’s needs and how can I help to fulfill them“?

7. Just chill, in the end you’ll be alright.

Oh, there’ll be tough days but there’ll also be the not-so-tough ones. Don’t let anyone trick you into believing that everyday you will be called upon to resite IV lines at 1:00 am or to prepare a patient for surgery at 10:00 pm. 

There are days you’ll have few to no patients on the ward, canceled surgeries, missed appointments and so on. When such days come, enjoy them! 

***

As a closing thought, here’s an adapted thought from a fellow blogger (Omooba):

“Don’t let yourself get distracted. FOCUS is a slippery thing. You are going to live long. You are not going to spend even up to a quarter of your life doing HouseJob. Give it your time, and mind. The less things you entertain in your life at a time, the better the overall quality.”

I’ll be honest with you, there are things you love that just have to give up for a while, to be able to maximize this new phase. It might hurt at first, but it’ll be worth it in the end.
So don’t forget the first rule, APPLY YOURSELF!

Here’s wishing you an “extension” and “extra call” free, housemanship year.

Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::
❀️❀️❀️

Housejob Chronicles- GOALS!

Hey folks,

So since starting this housejob thingy, I’ve been working roughly 12-15 HOURS a day, for 7 DAYS a week! (no kidding)

But I am not complaining, because FOR THIS JOB, I prayed. Haha…

Thankful this is NOT my portion…looolπŸ˜‚
Btw, Lokoja is a lovely place to live in, minus the “hot weather” and the “water-rationing” (one of the things I miss about home)…haha.

Everywhere I go, people have been kind to me. From my Uncle’s family that currently hosts me, to random people giving me rides or buying me snacks. Even most of the nurses, doctors and patients’ caregivers I have met have been nice.
Also I’ve met some of my Kinsfolk (one from Magongo, two from Ogori)and what a joy it was to communicate in our local dialect.

Anyway, as per Housejob, I was told that my department (surgery) is the toughest so to speak (followed by ObGyn, Paeds & Int Med- I suppose), and my unit (Paediatric Surgery) is relatively a “soft-landing” i.e. we are in an off-season atm, with only about 20% of our patients requiring critical care. 
My first call was smooth. I was summoned just twice (one case of AUR, one case of Fever) so I grabbed a couple hours of sweet sleep.

I’m thankful that I still have “windows of time” to do the things I really enjoy doing-Reading, Blogging, Spanish tutorials, Music and the likes.

Because not every time work, sometimes flexing.

I’m learning to make the most of the opportunities I get to relax and be as productive as possible rather than just while away on social media or with random gists.

I love this phrase:

So I’ve come up with a number of goals that I hope to achieve by the end of my housemanship year. (Thanks to one of the speakers at the ARD house officers welcoming). Here it goes: 
5 Deliveries 

– 5 NGT Insertions

– 5 Skin Suturing

-10 DREs

-15 VEs

-15 Urinary Catheterizations

-20 IV line setting

-25 Venepunctures

Total Procedures: 100.

Succeeded in : 0πŸ˜‚

Attempts: 2 Venepunctures, 2 IV lines (flat veins syndrome), 1 urinary catheterization (assisted), 1 skin suturing (no stamina to push in the needle😭).

I’m sharing this, because at the end of my Housejob sojourn I’d like to compare notes and see how far I’ve gone. 
And I hope to write more about the Housejob as it progresses.

So help me God.

My Housejob face…lol
Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::

πŸ’•πŸ’•πŸ’•

6 Types of Medical Students

Disclaimer: This post is on a VERY light note and all characters in it are entirely fictional.

If you’ve been in medical school long enough, you’ll find out that each medical student you meet is different from the next. Knowing this provides you with a balanced perspective in approaching medical school and helps you to set realistic expectations for yourself. 

Please note that the humor and  sarcasm in the labels are a bit exaggerated and the list is by no means exclusive. 

Enjoy!

1. The Bookworm/Silent Genius

A.K.A The Nerd.

(S)he is your average Joe, who sits in a corner of the lecture room or at the very front to avoid any form of distraction. (S)he hardly talks in class unless asked a question.

Bookworms may be loners or friendly, depending on their personalities.

Credit: 123RF

The school library is usually their second home and they would often stay back after school hours and on weekends to study.
If you need someone to put you through the Kreb’s Cycle the night before your Biochemistry test, just call a friend, sorry, nerd.

Interestingly, a nerd’s life is not only about medical school and studying. Some have remarkable interests in art, photography, music, nature, or poetry.

As expected, the nerd is likely to be the class valedictorian.

2. The Popular Student/Party-goer

Every class has a Chris (or Chrissa).

That one person who seems to be friends with everybody (or who everyone says “hello” to). Like a magnet pulling objects towards its core, they can’t help but draw attention to themselves.

Chrissa is the fashionista who is up-to-date with her weaves, makeup and accessories. Chrissa would rather finish a season of Grey’s Anatomy than study for her Anatomy test over the weekend.

Chris is the cool dude with the latest ride, phone and wristwatch. He even wears designer shoes. He is also an unrepentant sports fan and doesn’t mind skipping a class or two to watch a game.

Both thrive on fun and have activities planned for every weekday and weekend. They know every interesting place there is in town and often find time to steal away for out-of-town adventures.

As a rule the popular guys are “book-smart” and manage to keep up with their studies, with some performing quite exceptionally.

3. The Activist/Politician
This is Bill.

He is on the face of every bill board in the school.

Bill participates in most, if not all, student events and plays active roles in the student government. He is eager to stand up for (or against) a cause and easily draws a large following.

Bill is also quick to point out the inefficiencies of the school administration as well as unfair student policies, and mobilizes other students into signing petitions.
If you need something done, all you need is to get Bill involved.

Bill is sometimes unlucky enough to get into conflict with the school advisory committee and may even suffer some setbacks academically.

But Bill doesn’t mind, he will do anything for the cause of justice even if it means getting expelled from medical school.


Bill
as we know, is likely to run for Global President, a decade from now and we ALL would vote for him.

4. The Nervous wreck/”Water-works” Student

Lisa is fidgety and cries a lot.

She cries at the beginning of the semester on merely seeing the class timetable.

She cries before every test, not knowing if she would do her best.
She cries after every test, not knowing if she has done her best.


Lisa
is often the last to check the score board and needs the support of a friend or two, to do that.

Credit: Quickmeme.com
She cries if she fails the test, she always knew she would.
She cries if she passes the test, she thinks it’s a narrow escape.

This kind of student needs lots of reassurance from time to time.
It’s not unusual to find her malingering and having to reschedule her tests/exams a few times.

Sometimes, Lisa needs more than a box of Kleenex and a shoulder to cry upon. If she has other psychological issues, she might benefit from seeing a therapist.

5. The Indifferent/Absentee Student

We’ll call him Fred.

Fred hardly shows up in class. And when he does, he is late and never stays until the end.

In fact half of the time Fred is in class, he is on his mobile phone texting or playing a game. And weird enough, the lecturers don’t seem to mind.

As a rule, he is the last to get to the exam hall and always the first to leave.

He never stays around long enough to strike a conversation with anybody and isn’t known to hang out with any friends outside school.

He is such a recluse that nobody really knows where he lives and whether he is a real student or a “phony student” sent in by the CIA.

To add to the mystery, Fred stops coming to school after 1 or 2 semesters.

Maybe Fred was never a student after all! 

6. The Know-It-All/Competitive Student

Meet Maria.
Maria is a smart but bossy student who likes to intimidate others with her smartness.

She claims to know everything there is to know about everything there is to know.

In every class, the Pathology lecturer tells her to wait until the next class before he answers her question- which just happens to be the next topic!

Maria chairs the table in every Anatomy lab session and believes that her dissecting skills are second only to that of the Anatomy Professor.

She dominates every group work and outshines others in every seminar presentation.

To her credit, Maria knows how to go the extra, extra mile in getting whatever task she’s given. No wonder, she’s every teacher’s favorite student.

Credit: 123RF


Maria strives to know the test scores of all the students in class and gives a cold shoulder to anyone who performs slightly better than her.

***

What type of medical student would you say you are (were)?

I would say I was almost nerdish (“almost” because sometimes I’m in class supposedly paying rapt attention, but my mind is 10000 miles away πŸ™ˆπŸ™ˆ).

***

:::requine:::
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