OCTOBER|| C O U R A G E


It’s a few days into October already and all I can say is, God is good!

While meditating on what theme this month would be about, one word that stood out in my heart, was COURAGE. And I believe God was giving me a gentle reminder, that when everything else fails (my plans and what-not), I can look up to him and remain courageous.

Here are a few synonyms for the word COURAGE:
“bravery, pluckiness, valor, fearlessness, intrepidity, nerve, daring, audacity, boldness, grit, hardihood, heroism, gallantry”

And I’ll go with the first, BRAVERY

the admirable quality of being able to confront frightening things. It takes bravery for a knight to battle a dragon, but it also takes bravery for a shy child to walk into a new classroom.
(Vocabulary.com)

It’s little wonder that the song in my heart for this season just happens to be:

||WORSHIPYou make me brave (Amanda Cook)

And it’s one of my favorite songs ever! I remember having it on repeat for sometime last year.

||WORD– Lamentations 3:22-24 GNB

“The LORD ‘s unfailing love and mercy still continue, Fresh as the morning, as sure as the sunrise. The LORD is all I have, and so I put my hope in him.” 

I especially love the line that reads,

Fresh as the morning, as sure as the sunrise
. How reassuring that is! 

I still don’t know all God has in stock for me this season but I’m stepping out of the shadows of fear, discouragement and doubts and embracing his promises by faith.

And Amen to that!
***
In a nutshell, here’s what I’ve been upto:

|| My Ankara crafts and designs exhibition (As Promised)



My trainer, Niyot of Beracah House of Fashion, who is also a longtime friend did such a great job and I’m thankful for the opportunity to learn through her. Moving forward, I think I’ll be focusing on the Ankara book covers and see what designs I can come up with.

|| Still Learning

Spanish and Igbo!

|| Recent Reads:

Anthills of the Savannah (Chinua Achebe)
This was my first time reading any Chinua Achebe’s book. I’d attempted “There was a Country” earlier this year but found it difficult to continue with it. Not too long ago, I picked up this title, but I wasn’t enjoying the plot, so I dropped it. Eventually, one bored evening I summoned up courage and jumpstarted it (i.e. started reading right from the middle) and I was so intrigued that I read until the end. I found the book compelling, thought-provoking and with a melodramatic ending.

I heard that song before (Mary Higgins Clark)
I totally loved this book (although I’m sure I’ve read it before but totally forgot the plot), the writer kept me guessing until the very end. It had the right amount of suspense that kept me glued till the last page. If you’re a fan of mystery/crime/suspense books, I totally recommend that you read this one.

And then there were none (Agatha Christie)
I first read this book a couple of years ago, I had an idea about the plot but forgot how it ended, so I decided to read it again. So it was the Judge after all, what a twist!

|| Currently Reading:

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (Stephen R. Covey)

Principles and Values become more evident when we think of how short life is.

||Re-reading (For my Small Group Bible-study):

UNSTOPPABLE (Christine Caine)

Some start for the gold but end up with the bronze. Some start for the gold but do a poor exchange and can not continue. Some start for the gold but drop the baton and are disqualified. Some start for the gold and not only win the race, but break a record doing so.

|| Recent Adventure: A Mini-vacay!

So yours sincerely took a few days off to spend in Lagos. Yaaaas!!!
You know how I feel about the city already (You can read about my previous experiences here and here). This time around though, I was not constrained by a lack of “cash” or “time” nor any urgent business to take care of. I wanted to not just pass through Lagos, but actually savor it all over like a first-timer.

The summary of my stay was: Sightseeing, Window-shopping (plus some micro-shopping…lol), People-watching, Reading novels, Eating and Sleeping. I eventually stayed more indoors than outdoors, and found it kinda boring, thanks to EKEDC…😑🙄

I went off to visit one of my friends (@Tyn) and enjoyed every moment of it. Also went on a date with my sister to watch the movie, FLATLINERS (a Sci-Fi/Medical Thriller/Horror combo). The plot wasn’t too bad, in my opinion. Definitely PG material.

Then I ran into one of my seniors from Unilorin, Eyitayo, at the Palms Mall (saw him last in 2010…haha), I started “gisting” my sis how he is such a prominent figure on FB, and a kind-of-social activist etc. He is someone I actually respect (from a distance) and it was an honor to see him again, howbeit for a few minutes.

Finally, I got to ride in an Uber, then a BRT bus for the first time ever and I enjoyed both (for different reasons). Lagos is such a lovely place tbh, I just don’t see myself living there. But who knows, ehn?😉


Enjoy the lovely views!


To wrap up the post, here are my

|| 9 Intriguing Lessons [plus 1 Life Changing Discovery] from 2017:

1. Social media is overrated. I know it sounds cliché, but I’m only beginning to understand that phrase. I’ve now realized that Facebook (which was the social media platform I used the most) is not that important. I used to think it was impossible for me to do without Facebook in a day until I actually put some structure to my social media time and now I have days when I completely forget to log in. It’s amazing isn’t it? Ever wondered what we all did before the advent of social media?

2. Not everything that is happening will continue to happen. “Time” and “Chance” happens to all men. If you’re a Nigerian living in Nigeria, have you ever wondered what happened to the likes of Mr. Biggs and Tantalizers? My sentiments exactly.

3. Time alone doesn’t make things better, deliberate actions do. Thanks to the Mother Hen (Remi Owadokun) for this. If something is bad and you do nothing about it, it will only get worse.

4. Forgiveness is not forgetfulness, but choosing not to remember. Choosing not to remember an offense is quite different from forgetting it, as if it never happened. I so needed that closure. Phew!

5. What you do is more important than what you know. We have many “knowers” but far too few “doers.” Memo to me. Noted!

6. To every stage in life, there is a backstage and to every scene there’s a behind-the-scene. Truth!

7. Others are different from you, and so are you from others. Our unity lies in our individual uniqueness and not in our uniformity (or conformity).

8. (More than your phones, wallets, money, relationships etc) The enemy targets your joy, don’t let him steal it!

9. The Nigerian Police may (or may not) be your friend. Not all policemen are unkind, rude or wicked. Ditto Lawyers, Nurses, Doctors etc Having a preconceived mindset can be harmful.

10. I don’t like bread. In fact, I’ve never liked it, and I’m only just realizing that. So I’ve only been tolerating bread all my life?! Well, it’s better late than never.

|| Inspiration from around the web:

1. On Adulting, Rounding Up My Housemanship Year and Future Plans

2. Why I Shut Down My Instagram Account (Cutting back to move forward)
3. What it means to be a Christian doctor

4. Preparation: A lesson from Hurricane Irma

5. Nothing to prove

Ps: Still on the job search, if you’ve been praying, please pray harder! 🙏🏾
___

*EKEDC: Eko Electricity Distribution Company

:::Requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️

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MEMOIRS OF A MUSHIN GIRL.

PS: This post was inspired by Nedoux’s I LIVE HERE.

Photo credit: WEB

Disclaimer: I no be Lagos pikin o (i.e. I was neither “born” nor “bred” there). Infact I’ve never really been a fan of Lagos, and I don’t think I’m ready to change my mind yet😁. So y’all should take my observations/conclusions with a pinch of salt (and pepper😜). Tenkiu!


Story-behind-the-Story:
Like some of you know, yours sincerely was a short-term guest (and tourist) in the famous city of Lagos for about 3 months, because of the MDCN remedial program for FTDs which took place at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH). While my stay wasn’t an entirely rosy one, it sure had its perks.
Since LUTH provided limited accommodation for those who registered for the program, I had to make alternative arrangement. For the first few weeks, I stayed with my cousin’s family in Ebutte-Meta, but the commute (especially after closing hours) took its toll on me. So I was all determined to find a place to rent around LUTH (i.e. Surulere-Idiaraba-Mushin axis) which proved even more challenging than I expected.

House hunting
anywhere is not an easy task, but unlike my SVG experience, the Naija house agents I came across were quite “mouthed” (i.e. smooth talkers with little integrity, unfortunately).
I didn’t even know there was such a thing as viewing fee- where you paid the agent a certain amount just for showing you an apartment (whether you want to rent the place or not. Like seriously?!). One guy requested for a whole 5K as viewing fee and I was like, “Mba, I think I’ll pass.” 

I had to make calls upon calls, visited a couple of places (including stuffy wannabe guest houses, *rolls eyes*) before finding an apartment (thanks to a contact from an old friend), that was remotely affordable and suitable for the purpose of my stay. Thus began my sojourn in the neighborhood called M-U-S-H-I-N

And looking back, I have no regrets (except that I didn’t really get to explore other areas in Lagos, because “no time” and “no money”).

***

Living in Mushin.

Mushin
, a closely-knit community, largely known for its history of violence ranging from local gang clashes to political uproars, is one of the few neighborhoods in Lagos, that the average (educated, upper middle-class) Lagosian, wouldn’t consider living in (as a first choice, anyway).
When compared to its immediate neighbors like Surulere and Yaba, Mushin is but a REFINED (or should I say, GLORIFIED) slum. One of the things I admire about the community though, is that the streets if narrow, are relatively well-planned and the roads are fairly accessible.
A friend of mine who has lived in Lagos for a while, expressed his concerns about my safety in that neighborhood. Thankfully, throughout my stay I did not have an unfortunate experience.

Mushin is quite densely populated, with buildings literally filling up every inch of land in the community. My street, Kosobameji (which is a 3-minute walking distance by the way), apart from the residential buildings, had at least 5 Churches, 2 Mosques, 4 Schools and 10 Shops; and is just a mere fraction of the Mushin Community. Other streets were interconnected to ours in such a way, that there were multiple routes to get to the Main Street (LUTH road), which eventually joined the dual-carriage Mushin main road.
My roommate and I shared a storey building (that sits on about half a plot) with 5 other families. That’s the smallest compound I’ve ever lived in. Thankfully, we had a cordial relationship with our neighbors, most of the time. We simply had to contribute to paying for the prepaid card for electricity, as well as the waste disposal fee, and took turns washing the gutter. 
Mushin is everything from hilarious to sometimes utterly ridiculous. There were days I enjoyed the bustling LIFE, and other days I wondered how I found myself in such a place in the first place.

Highlights of my stay in MUSHIN:

LAGOS, Nigeria.

Call-To-Prayer:
The early morning call-to-prayer by Muslim clerics that unfailingly usher you into the day (doesn’t help that there are multiple mosques in the area), plus the subsequent calls till late evening. The good thing though, was that I learnt the specific times Muslims pray every day (5 a.m, 6 a.m, 1 p.m,  4 p.m, 7 p.m, and 8 p.m) and tried to adjust accordingly.

Street Football:

Photo credit: WEB

Sunday afternoon in Mushin, is a time for anyone and everyone to participate in a local game of football whether as players, fans or mere observers. The annoying thing though, is that the entire street is converted into a playing field; so pedestrians and motorists have to maneuver their way through, to avoid getting hit.

Owambe:


Owambe
(a slang for Partying) in Mushin, is on a different level. It basically consists of late evening drinking, dining and dancing, that extends from the host’s compound to the front of his neighbor’s compound (for lack of space), often rendering the street inaccessible to motorists and passers by. And I don’t think anyone needs to obtain their neighbors’ permission before doing such.
I recall how surprised I was the first time, when I met people partying right in front of our gate, only to discover that the celebrant wasn’t even from the compound.

Photo credit: WEB

Street Food:
On moving to Mushin, fried yam/sweet potatoes, fried plantain and akara, became my favorite things to snack on, because there were food stalls on every street corner. It’s perhaps the only thing I really miss about Mushin.

Photo credit: WEB

 

Street food in Naija is a MUST for any foreigner to experience. 

Water Vendors/Borehole Madam:

Photo credit: WEB
On days when there was no electricity to pump water into the house, we hired Water Vendors (locally called Abokis) to supply us with water and although the unit cost was cheap (N25 per fetch), it quickly added up to about N1000 at the end of a week, which was expensive.
A number of times, I had to go to the neighborhood borehole (less than 2-minute walking distance from my apartment) to buy water from this thick, black, never-smiling Madam (whose name I didn’t know). I was always intrigued by the number of people, both young and old, who were her daily customers and wondered how much sales she actually made every day.

“Akape” Story:
This is still the funniest experience as regards my stay in Mushin. One early morning (around past six), I had to go in search of painkillers, so an Okada guy took me to an open drugstore, where I found one sleepy Baba seated.
After telling him what I wanted, he offered me a clear plastic bag containing about 10 tablets, of different colors, shapes and sizes; popularly called “Akape” by the locals. This was from someone with little or no medical knowledge about the drug interactions of what he had prescribed.
When I asked what the pills were for, he said they could work for all kinds of pain (and in my mind I was like 😱😱😱). I quickly asked for known drugs like Diclofenac and Ibuprofen. Thankfully he had the former, so I double-checked its expiring date, paid for it and left. My mistake according to another Doctor-friend, was not buying the “Akape” for a proper analysis of the drug mix. I’ve heard that some local chemists would sometimes prescribe everything from anti-hypertensive meds to anti-thyroid meds for simple cases of Malaria.

Lights out:
Perhaps the most challenging issue with my stay in Mushin was the initial absence of electricity in the neighborhood, when my friend and I moved in. For a whole week, the light barely blinked and there were nights I cried myself to sleep.
Most nights we had to keep the window and door to our apartment wide-open to allow for proper ventilation, and there were nights we actually slept off…like that! Thankfully, we did not experience any incidence of theft.

Mosquitos, Rats and Cockroaches
were our regular companions in the apartment. The first two I could tolerate, the last I absolutely detested. Cockroaches are just plain irritating…ugh!

Kids at Play:
One of the families living in my compound had four kids, all boys! And these lads loved to play (sing and shout) all day, everyday, sometimes right up to our window/doorstep. A number of times, I actually had to step out of the apartment to reprimand them because I was either trying to sleep or to study. It took an extra caution on my part not to actually SPANK one of the kids, which would have been terrible because my hands ain’t exactly “Child-Friendly.” 😂😂😂

***

If you enjoyed reading this, you might also enjoy THIS IS LAGOS!

:::requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️

*FTDs- Foreign Trained Doctors.

DAY 16: SMALL FAVORS!!!

Welcome back.
Tonight I miss SVG, especially the smooth living conditions…wifi, light, running water, great variety of food, easy shopping et al.
My life was so simple and easy to organize.
You don’t consider how blessed you are until you have to do without one or two conveniences.
Those seemly insignificant things I enjoyed and often took for granted, have become a luxury since returning to Nigeria.
Things as simple as listening to music while in the shower, taking a walk or doing some chores, have been next to impossible.
In the last few days/weeks especially, I’ve been on a battery-saving regimen for all my electronic gadgets as the light situation in my current neighborhood is almost non-existent.
Governor Ambode, pls epp us na!😥😰😪
To be honest, this is one reason why some of my posts for this blog challenge are being delayed or canceled altogether. Talk about a very “challenging” challenge.
Anyway I’m not here to whine or complain 🤓😄 because despite the situation…
I’m thankful for God’s goodness and lots of small favors. 
Especially the ones I often take for granted:
1- Shelter: Nothing fancy, but an affordable, accessible and safe place to live in.
2- Food: it doesn’t matter whether or not I eat rice, bread or noodles every other day of the week. Thank God for eggs, beef, fish and fried plantain. My meals are never dull.
3- Clothing: Thank God for “wash and wear” attires (60% of my wardrobe can do without ironing) and a durable, multipurpose footwear that goes anywhere and everywhere. Black flats are bae!!!
And believe it or not, I’m thankful for street vendors (every basic need is within reach), okadas/kekes (fast and affordable means of transportation), the local fetchers (I can buy water at a token fee), my power bank (to augment power supply) and yes, a plastic hand fan (to keep heat, flies and mosquitoes away).
Lest I forget, I’m also thankful for pure water!!! (cheap and clean water to drink) 😂😆
pure-water-sachets
Again, thank God for small favors.
 
In the words of Apostle Paul, (I can say by faith):
“I know what it is to be in need and what it is to have more than enough. I have learnt this secret, so that anywhere, at any time, I am content, whether I am full or hungry, whether I have too much or too little. I have the strength to face all conditions by the power that Christ gives me.”
‭‭Philippians‬ ‭4:12-13‬ ‭GNB‬‬
Let me also add that I’m glad to be back in Nigeria. There have been numerous testimonies. God remains faithful while the enemy is continually defeated.
Like my friend, Lekan Oyekanmi, sang, I believe things are working in Nigeria.
Nigeria will arise. And SOON.
So what are you thankful for today?
***

For deliciousness creating butterflies in your belly,

Contact BUTTERFLIESTREATS for your weddings, birthdays and other events

We make cakes (fondant, buttercream), small chops, snacks etc 

Location: Oyo town, Oyo state, Nigeria.

Contact: 07063502765

Butterfliestreats@gmail.com

@butterfliestreats (instagram)

***

asa

Stay fervent,
:::requ1ne:::

THIS IS LAGOS!


Hey guys, guess who is in Lagos?
It’s yours sincerely.

What can I say? 

It’s been an unusually intense two weeks plus for me.

Some days I can’t even believe I’m still here, but here I am. This is the longest I’ve ever stayed in Lag, and I’m going to be here for a little while longer.

Una see wetin MDCN don cause? I was already dreaming of the ancient town of Ile-Ife or the calm city of Benin, I didn’t mind traveling all the way to Enugu. Anyway, that one na tory for another day.
Before I launch into my post, here are 5 facts about Lagos that you probably didn’t know:

1. Lagos is the smallest state by geographical size in Nigeria.


2. Lagos is the most populated city in Nigeria.


3. Lagos is the economic capital of Nigeria.


4. Lagos is the second fastest growing city in Africa.


5. The name Lagos was originally given by Portugese explorers as “Largo de Curamo” which means a collection of lakes.

(Credits: Naija.com, Facts.ng)

I won’t even lie I’ve always had some form of trepidation when it comes to facing the hustle and bustle of Lagos city.

All my life I’ve had the privilege of visiting Lagos only for a couple of days at most, and usually with someone to show me around.

However not this time. I’ve literally been on my own (aka OYO), transiting from Idi-Araba to Ojuelegba to Yaba to Oyingbo then Ebutemetta, until much recently when I relocated to a nearby apartment. 
It’s true what they say “Eko o gba gbere rara” which means “There’s no room for dulling in Lagos.”

For someone who is inexperienced about street-life and also coming from a less intense city like Ib (which is the “new Lagos” anyway, with the rapid rate at which it’s growing), I’m learning to be hyper-vigilant about everything and everyone in Lagos, just because…you never know. 
My new motto is: Shine your eyes well!

Thankfully, I’ve not experienced any incidence of theft or assault throughout my stay, Hallelujah to Jesus!
For the life of me, I have never envied Lagosians, I’m always like “What’s in your Lagos sef?” 🙄😑

A couple of times I’ve actually argued with people over the pros and cons of living in Lagos. Apart from the bubbling city life, remarkable job opportunities and lots of fun places that can be visited, Lagos to me, is just a hubbub of mental and physical stress. Here are a few:

1. The Traffic.

Traffic congestion in Lagos is incomparable. Depending on where one resides, some folks (including school-aged children) leave their homes as early as 4 a.m. and do not return until late evening. I can’t even imagine that kind of lifestyle. Thankfully, traffic doesn’t happen so often on the route I take. And from the information I’ve gathered, where Lagos traffic is concerned, things are better than they used to be. As for me, I just can’t do it, I will pack my bags and jejely leave Lagos ni o.

2. The crowd. 

Lagos is r-o-w-d-y! Like seriously, visit a place like Tejuosho market, and you will wonder where that sea of people come from. You can’t conveniently walk in some parts of Lagos, without getting shoved from behind or bumped into, by other pedestrians. Lagos is a place where everyone is constantly on the move, if you’re not after something, it is likely that something is after you.


The good thing though is that I like to watch people, so the Lagos crowd kinda provides me with some side-attraction; from the random beggars on the street, to the Igbo traders displaying their wares on the floor, then my co-passengers inside Lagos Molue and all sorts of roadside vendors, I always get my fill of daily drama and comic relief 😅

3. The noise. 

I don’t like noise abeg and Lagos has too much of it. When it’s not the Agberos shouting at the motor garage, it’s the noise from buses, okadas and trailers blaring their horns, and everywhere you go there’s one generating plant or the other in use (EKEDC no dey try abeg). In general, there’s sha noise everywhere, schools, churches and mosques kuku plenty. One good thing is that the van drivers don’t play high volume/deafening music (something I don’t miss about SVG). It’s not too strange to also see brawls breaking out among people on the streets for one reason or the other. Lagosians are very entertaining.

4. The Hustling.

Chai, Lagos is full of hustlers. People typically migrate to Lagos in order to “make it” and will do whatever it takes to get “there.”

Everyone is trying to make ends meet usually at other people’s expense. The headquarters of The Nigerian Opportunists Club is located in Lagos. Too many victims of fraudsters and scammers on a daily basis. I don’t trust anyone in Lagos (not anywhere in Nigeria sef), I simply walk by faith and not by sight and God has been faithful. 

Lagos has been described as the city that never sleeps, and how can they when money-making is their number one priority? 😬
With these few points of mine, I hope I’ve been able to convince and not to confuse you, that the city of Lagos is no place for the faint-hearted. Kudos to Governor Ambode and co, one day Lagos go better.

Having said that, it is also expedient for me to reiterate that Lagos is a land of abundant opportunities. It provides the confidence for you to dream and dare, and the courage to face any challenge that occurs. With the high rate of successful feats and giant accomplishments in Lagos, compared to other parts of Nigeria, you’re instilled with the hope to dream and live your dreams.

So on behalf of myself and other visitors to Lagos, I say,

Welcome to Lagos, where GREAT things happen.

Eko o ni baje o.

Amin.

PS: So like I mentioned in my last post, I will be helping some of my Facebook friends promote their growing businesses on my blog. This will hopefully run through the first half of the year. Stay tuned.

For deliciousness creating butterflies in your belly,

Contact BUTTERFLIESTREATS

We make cakes (fondant, buttercream), small chops, snacks etc

Location: Oyo town, Oyo state, Nigeria.

Contact details: 07063502765, butterfliestreats@gmail.com

 @butterfliestreats (instagram)



***

With love from Lasgidi,

😘😘😘

:::requ1ne:::

MY GREEN PASSPORT & FOUR COUNTRIES.

Hey People,

So yours sincerely returned to Nigeria a few days ago.

Thankfully, I had a smooth journey, there were no flight delays or cancellations.

I transversed the Atlantic Ocean, from the Caribbean to the United Kingdom and finally Africa. The entire journey took approximately 16 hours, minus the stop overs.

So here is a mini breakdown of my trip and the things I enjoyed about it:

1. SVG TO LONDON

I left SVG on Monday afternoon amidst hugs and some reserved tears, for St. Lucia on the LIAT airline. It was my first time in St. Lucia and though I didn’t get off the plane, I could see that it would be a cool place to visit. A few more passengers came on board and we left for Barbados. The entire journey from St. Vincent to Barbados was about 1 hr 15 minutes. Barbados is a MUST for anyone considering a vacation in the Caribbean. Thankfully, the immigration process was smooth. I’ve learnt not to take it personal when the Barbados Immigration officials ask random, annoying questions about why I’m visiting and when I’m supposed to leave. I had the experience the last two times I was in Barbados.

I was able to use the bathroom and have a light snack before boarding the British Airways to the UK. I don’t know why, but food is always tastier while I’m in transit. As a rule I eat more and try out new food. I don’t understand why LIAT airline doesn’t serve complimentary meals. There should be a law that all airlines have to serve meals no matter the duration of the flight. 

The flight to the UK was about 8 hours, but it was the most enjoyable because I had enough to eat and entertain myself with. I also watched ANGRY BIRDS Movie and THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS, and slept for the rest of the trip. 

2. LONDON TO CASABLANCA 

On arrival at the GATWICK Airport, I passed through immigration with ease and then found my way to the train station. 

With two luggages and a hand bag, it was tough navigating the several stairs I encountered. But God was faithful to bring a couple of sweet gentlemen my way at intervals. Londoners are too kind. Don’t you agree? 

“Can I help you with that?”

“Yes please, thank you so much”

“Do you need help?”

“Yes, I’ll appreciate it.”

Oh my, I was too pleased to hand over my luggage every time. I actually took on the role of a Princess in distress…hahaha.


I took the train from Gatwick to Victoria Park, then to South Kensington, from where I got on the Piccadilly line and we went from station to station, until I finally got down at the Terminal 4 of Heathrow Airport. 


I was able to have a typical English breakfast at an airport cafe, then walked around for some window (more than actual) shopping. I almost embarrassed myself while asking about some wristwatches, I didn’t realize the prices were all in 4 digits. When I discovered my error, I quietly left the store for another.

By evening, I was on board the Royal Air Maroc in a flight to Casablanca, Morocco. It was a less fun (no TV for entertainment) trip but I absolutely enjoyed the meals served. For a 3-hour trip, we had more than enough to eat and drink. Eating and Sleeping were my favorite activities, since I didn’t download any novels to read. Candy crush disappointedly refused to open as well. There was a bit of people-watching on my part too, and for the first time I discovered Non-Nigerian Pidgin speakers. 

3. CASABLANCA TO NIGERIA

I didn’t realize until my flight that English wasn’t an official language in the country, I heard more of Arabic and French. I was able to buy a few more items at the Airport and the currency in use was Euros. I later learnt their official currency is Moroccan Dirham (MAD). I was quite exhausted walking around the shops. My flight to Nigeria was around midnight and it took us 4 hours to get to Lagos. There was more eating and sleeping during the flight. Since Nigeria is a hour ahead of Morocco, we arrived about 5 a.m. (Nigerian Time). 




I was surprised that the MURITALA MOHAMMED INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, Lagos, was more sophisticated than the last time I visited (in 2014), and there was even air conditioning in the arrival lounge. So I was welcomed in the typical Nigerian way, and it was only in Nigeria that the Green Passport was classified as a priority. 

“Do you have the Nigerian Passport?”

“Yes”

“Go that way”

After passing through the immigration, there were porters all over asking if I needed help with my luggages, taxi service, or calls. I was also approached to change foreign currency. It was good to be home. There were several eateries, stands for Network providers and some business centers. I didn’t see much of souvenir shops though. A porter allowed me to call my mum and led me to an eatery where I bought a snack and bottle of water, I couldn’t get access to wifi and was really exhausted because I had to wait for about 5 hours before I was eventually picked up, thanks to Lagos traffic et al. 

Now that I’m home I would like to write about 7 common myths about staying abroad. It promises to be enlightening. Stay tuned.


Thanks for reading,

:::requ1ne:::