HouseJob Chronicles: Memoirs of an Ex-Houseofficer (5)

1. Can we meet you?

I’m Adeniran Eunice, a graduate of All Saints University, Saint Vincent and The Grenadines. 


2. What was your most favorite posting, and why?

Internal medicine a.k.a Netflix and chill. 

I liked almost everything minus the consultant ward rounds, A and E calls, outpatient clinics and the every day morning reviews. 


3. What was your least favorite posting, and why?

Paediatrics. 

Too much tension in that department, it was as if I was walking around egg shells so I was always stressed out.


4. Your best call ever?

The calls I didn’t do (either sold or simply helped)😃😀


5. Your worst call ever?

Labor ward calls….arrrgh!!!


6. Nicest Chief(s) to work with:

Dr. Sule (Obstetrics/Gynecology). He was the coolest, calmest and the most collected of all.


7. Life lessons from House job:

i. When you get what you want make sure you want what you get.

ii. God can be trusted even when life makes no sense. 

iii. Life not only takes time, life takes effort. 


8. What are you thankful for?

God’s protection over my life as a resident outside the hospital facility, and over my health during the Lassa fever scare, despite being in close contact with a patient that eventually tested positive. 


9. Your most embarrassing moment?

The day a consultant made me cry because I came late for morning review. 


10. Rate your HouseJob Experience on a scale of 1-5:

3/5


11. Call food, Yay or Nay?

Nay. I’ll eat a home-cooked meal any day. 


12. Longest day of Housejob?

Every day as a Team A member during my Paediatric Posting. Surviving each day was a testimony. 


13. Happiest day during Housejob:

The last day of Housejob, which happened to be a day before my next call 😂. Indeed, I serve a living God.


14. New skills learnt?

Practically everything from securing an IV access to inserting a urinary catheter to scrubbing in for surgery.  

15. Any regrets?

Not taking a single vaginal delivery (but I’m a pro, now😄)


16. Most admirable consultant:

Dr. Nwafulume, simply because I was given the rest of the day off, the day we lost one of our colleagues.


17. Most likely specialty and why?

Psychiatry. For the love of mental health.


18. Most unlikely specialty. Why?  

Obstetrics and Gynecology. I detest the smell of perineal blood and waiting on labor patients is such a nightmare for me. 

19. Unforgettable patients: 

i. One of my very first patients as a House officer, who was managed as a case of ruptured typhoid ileitis. His recovery was nothing short of the miraculous. 

Like Deby said, Truly we (doctors) treat but it is God who heals.

ii. Another unforgettable patient was a young woman we managed during my surgery rotation who passed on due to complications. I’m still in touch with one of her sons, and each encounter is a sad reminder.  

iii. I once assisted in resuscitating a “Jane Doe” in the Emergency Room, who was involved in a RTA that involved multiple casualties. She couldn’t have been more than six years old, sadly she did not survive. To the best of my knowledge, no parents or caregivers came forward to claim the body (or maybe they were involved in the accident as well). 


20. Something to miss about Housejob: 

My friends. 

21. If not medicine, what?

Probably, Clinical Psychology.


22. What next after Housejob?

The Medical Officer life, then hopefully Residency. 


23. More important as an Houseofficer, skill or stuff?

Both are equally important.

But if you must find the balance, choose skill over stuff, ‘cos after HJ you’re mostly O.Y.O.


24. Favorite mantra? 

“We don’t complain, we give thanks.”


25. Shout out to (tag 3 HOs):

3 is a joke right?? Of Course it is. 

I want to appreciate all my colleagues that made my Housejob experience an awesome one. 

From @DrChimereze, the first person to show me my way around FMCL, to my unforgettable Flatmates @Emeka and @Osas, who treated me like a lady throughout our stay together, to my rotation partners @Vicky, @Comfy, @Tony, and @Nonso, who had my back always throughout our one-year-ride, to my amazing friends-turned-sisters @Sarah and @Debyo, to my one in a million sugar partner @DrM, my dearest @SPO, the ever friendly @Efosa_M.D, the easy going @DrAmeh, @KingJosh, and @DrFortune, thank you, thank you and thank you very much!!!

***

Editor’s Note: 

And the series Housejob Chronicles is officially a wrap. I hope you enjoyed each post. Don’t forget to send me an email at lolade1512@gmail.com if you have specific questions about Housejobs in Nigeria. 

Thank you for reading,

:::requ1ne:::
    ❤️❤️❤️

Housejob Chronicles: Memoirs of an Ex-HouseOfficer! (2)

Please read the previous part here
 

***

 1. Can we meet you?

 

I’m Dr Sarah Ifeoluwa Oloruntoba, a graduate of Bowen University  (2017)

 

2. Favorite posting, and why?:

O&G

I enjoyed the morning reviews and working with my senior colleagues. 

They made things so easy despite the fact that I was in a stressful unit as the only House Officer. 

I also had enough time to do other things I wanted to do (like blogging, cooking healthy meals etc)

 

3. Least favorite posting, and why?:

Surgery

 Surgery posting was extremely stressful. 

I didn’t even have the time to go to church and I spent almost everyday  in the hospital. I also didn’t like the fact that I couldn’t really plan my day without any interruption.
4. Best call(s) ever:

The calls I prayed about, telling God the specific number of patients I wanted to see and got my request.

 

5. Worst call ever:

One Gynae emergency call. That night was really eventful.

I was so scared but my chief Dr Sule, was calm and brave all through. 

One lesson I learnt from that call is how to be calm yet brave enough to face my fears and handle situations to the best of my ability while awaiting help. 

 

6. Nicest Chief(s) I worked with:

 Most of my chiefs were actually nice.

However there are some that I will not forget too quickly:

  • O and G posting: Dr Awolumate and Dr Akinro
  • Paediatrics posting: Dr Owa
  • Internal medicine posting: Dr Palma
  • Surgery posting: Dr Aduloju, Dr Ibrahim and Dr Ogoji 

 

7. Most admirable consultant:

Dr Temitope ODI (Consultant Paediatric Surgeon). 

Though I didn’t really know (or work with) him, but the inspirational speech he gave at our sendforth dinner told me a lot about him. An Empathetic Christian doctor who isn’t just out to make money but to make a difference. 

 

8. Most likely specialty, and why?:

Geriatrics. 

I just have this love for elderly people and I feel the way our health system is currently designed doesn’t really suit them 

i.e. the Nigerian healthcare system is NOT old-people friendly. 

Like Children, they have special needs and peculiarities that should be properly addressed. 

Many of these elderly men and women gave their youthful years in one form of service or the other to the nation, therefore they should benefit from good health care.

 

9. Most unlikely specialty, and why not?:

 

Surgery. 😱😱😱

That posting was too stressful.  Abeg!

And their wahala as a department was just too much (a department of numerous rules and regulations !)

I do love the practical aspect of surgery, but the unfair treatment I saw our senior colleagues (residents) go through was not funny.  I can’t live my life like that jare

 

10. Three life lessons from housejob:

 

i. Be brave enough to face your fears. 

ii. There is a thin line between life and death and as a doctor you may be the one with the pencil that will draw that line or the eraser that will clean it off. 

iii. Build Relationships, nurture them and cherish them.

11. Most embarrassing moment:

I honestly can’t remember any.

 

12. What are you thankful about:

 – God’s faithfulness in bringing to pass the things he said.

– All the people I met, especially all my teachers and colleagues.

– I am specially thankful for the new friends I have now. I didn’t really have a lot of friends before HouseJob but God gave me friends who are now my sisters. Hallelujah!

The 3 Musketeers❤️


 

13. Longest day ever:

Day ke? Dayssss… My entire SCBU posting!

 

14. Happiest day ever:

The day I saw my Primaries* result.

 

15. Something to miss:

  • The chiefs who were like older siblings to me. Those ones I could have a conversation with conveniently anytime.
  • My darling friends.
  • Weekend trips to Mount Patti (Fitfam Adventure☺️)

16. Rate your housejob experience on a scale of 1-5:

4/5 

 

17. Call food: Yay or Nay? 

Indifferent 

 

18. New skills learnt: 

Quite a number. 

 

19. Unforgettable patient

One patient in general surgery who had surgeries up to 3 times, due to complicated perforated typhoid Ileus, I think… Well, she is alive doing well!

There was another woman in Gynae ward who had a cancer. She is now late though.

20. Any regrets? 
None that I can think of.

 

21. Favorite mantra:

This too shall pass.

 
22. Shout out to 3 friends you made during house job: 

(Hian…3 is too small ooo!)

 

Debby– She opened her room to me for the entire period. It means so much to me and I just can’t thank her enough. 

She chose to be my friend and treated me like her sister. I love all the lovely moments we shared together gisting, going out etc

She taught me how to take care of my natural hair, and tried her best to bring me out of my shell 😉

Debby, God bless you dear🤗

Deby and I.

 

Eunice– She encouraged me to start my blog the first time I had a conversation with her. 

She is also motherly, caring, and a no-nonsense person. 😬


Ifeoluwa Yes, me! 😂 For sticking with me throughout the one year despite all my plenty wahala. For being bold and courageous to take new steps to an amazing new me. 


Baby girl, you’re the best!😘😍❤️
 
23. What next after housejob?

 

NYSC, then others as the Lord leads.

 

24. If not Medicine, then what? 
 

Farming, Catering/Baking. (Yes, I’m a foodie😅)

25. What’s more important for a House Officer, skill or stuff? 

Both. 

Stuff without skill is useless because the stuff will not transform to an intervention all by itself without appropriate application.

And skill without stuff makes one look like a gambler just trying something just to see if it will work or not, and if it does work, applying it to everyone that comes forgetting that patient care should be individualized. 

26. Thank you for sharing your Housejob experience.

Thanks for giving me the opportunity 😀. 

*Primaries: An exam written to enter into the residency program. 
 

***


Editor’s Note:

Dr Sarah (a.k.a Sarah Baby 😍), is my warm and wise friend-turned-sister, a chef of life and destiny (she can cook for Africa😂), budding blogger and a fellow believer in Christ. 

One of the most inspiring people I met during housejob. I really believe our meeting was not ordinary, God had a hand in it. 

Beneath her calm exterior is a depth with several stories of her journey with God, and an emphasis on his faithfulness and constant love. 

A foodie, lover of God and natural hair enthusiast, she doesn’t just preach her faith, she lives by it. 

Dr. Sarah blogs here.

Thank you for reading!

:::requ1ne:::

     â¤ï¸â¤ï¸â¤ï¸

HouseJob Chronicles: ObGyn Adventures.

I started my ObGyn posting on the first of May.

It was a public holiday (Workers’ day) but a Caesarean section had been booked for a senior colleague’s wife.

The Consultant, the only Female Obstetrician in our Centre, performed the surgery and was assisted by one of the senior residents.

The procedure lasted about an hour but I did not enjoy one bit of it. I told myself right then to keep away from the perineum by all means. 

Also Read: Chronicles of a Student-doctor (ObGyn Posting)

The first few weeks of my posting were strictly spent attending to antenatal cases, thanks to the ongoing JOHESU strike. 

The booking clinic (where a pregnant woman visits the doctor for the first time) runs once a week, while follow-up visits are scheduled based on how far gone the pregnancy is:

GA 12-28 weeks every month

GA 28-36 weeks every 2 weeks

GA 36-40 weeks every week

After the strike was called off, normal activities resumed in the department. 

I started with LABOR WARD Posting and had my first call on a Thursday evening. 

Though it wasn’t too busy, still I worked my butts off, and that became the pattern throughout my stay in the department. 

Every labor ward call I did was a hit from back to back, and it was rare to find the time to catch a nap even for a few hours. 

There were some calls where I had dinner right at my work desk.

I recall a couple of crazy calls where I actually dozed off while clerking patients 😂😂😂

And how can I ever forget the characteristic odor of liquor?

I hated that smell with a passion. 

It was in ObGyn I discovered my hatred for blood too – especially perineal blood. The smell and sight both made me queasy.

Thankfully most of my calls were uneventful as per mortality. 

 I got to assist in a number of Caesarean sections, which weren’t too exciting, because I lacked the “ginger” and the stamina. 

My best call was with Dr. Ochalla- the most “stressless” chief I worked with. That particular call was a bloody one, and he was very sympathetic with me.

I did my share of (accurate) Vaginal Examinations and attempted a couple of perineal tear repairs. I didn’t get to do an episiorrhaphy per se, as many of the cases I saw were actually bad (with multiple lacerations and PPH) and senior colleagues had to intervene.

Last, last, I didn’t take any delivery by myself. Perhaps the only regret I have in that department.

The other aspect of my ObGyn posting was Gynecology

It was a more enjoyable experience for me.
Many of the patients that presented during my posting and call hours were outpatient cases, so there was minimal stress for me.

One of the traumatic cases I saw was the delivery of a set of previable twins to a severely Ecclamptic woman and watching the second twin die (the first twin was somewhat deformed and had died inutero).

There were a few procedures I assisted with or performed- MVAs, taking Pap smear or ECS

In all my ObGyn posting was a fairly enjoyable one but I was glad when it was over. 

*GA– Gestational Age

*JOHESU– Joint Health Sector Unions

*Ginger– Interest

* ECS– Endocervical Swab

* MVA– Manual Vacuum Aspiration

*All images are from the web.


Also read: HouseJob Chronicles|| The Journey So Far.


And read: HouseJob Chronicles|| PROGRESS.

HouseJob Chronicles: 5 Ways NOT To Take Things Personal.

Hello People,

I had an experience at work the other day, interesting in retrospect, but very emotional for me at the time. I was hurt by some stuff one of my “Ogas at the top” said, and I ended in tears.

It was so embarrassing…long story short, I came out of the experience a better me.

In this post, I’d like to share a few tips with you about how NOT to take things personal as a House Officer, especially if you work (or plan to work) in Nigeria.

Enjoy!

***

1. Offenses will come.
Offenses are a part of life we all can’t do without. On a daily basis, we offend people and people offend us.

Unfortunately, even in the work-environment where everyone is expected to be cordial, people step on one another’s toes all the time.

As a House Officer, patients will annoy you, your colleagues will make you angry, and your seniors will frustrate you.

The way some patients view medical interns…🙄

Sadly, a lot of Nigerian doctors still see BULLYING as a necessary evil, and unless there’s a change in such mindset, House Officers will continue to be at the receiving end.

It’s in your own best interest to develop a thick skin against such scenarios, because they will surely come.

2. Keep Moving On.
No matter how bad a day seems, that day will pass.

Days will turn into weeks, weeks into months, and before you know it, your housejob experience is over.

If you want to survive as a House Officer unscathed, learn to move on quickly!

3. Be Considerate.
Eventually, what goes around comes around.

As a newbie doctor, maybe it’s time to change the narrative.

Be the difference you want to see.

To your patients show empathy. You have no idea what some of them are passing through.

To your colleagues show comradeship. You’re together in the struggle.

To your seniors show loyalty. They were once in your shoes.

It takes a little kindness to make a BIG difference.

In all, do your best and give the quality of care, treatment and respect you want others to give you.

4. Know your elastic limit.

When all is said and done, it is NOT every nonsense that you should allow.

I’m yet to walk out of a ward round, because God has REALLY helped me.

And I hope the day never comes because if it so happens…hehe

Like I say to anyone who cares to listen, I’m the only doctor in my family…I cannot come and die.

For your own sanity, speak up when you MUST.

If a colleague wants to take advantage of you, call such person to order.
If a patient tries to disrespect you, set him/her straight.
And if your seniors verbally or physically abuse you, to an extent that is unhealthy to your self-esteem, please report them to the appropriate quarters.

You’re a doctor, not a door-mat!

5. Laugh out Loud
When all is said and done, someone may just be having a bad day and looking for a channel to vent.

DO NOT become the scapegoat.

Try to to give your best at ALL times. Be timely. Be proactive. Don’t be lazy. Don’t be rude. Know your limits.

Refuse to be a casualty in another person’s mood instability.

And when you’ve done all you can, and someone still wants to make you angry or sad, just LAUGH OUT LOUD.

Image Credit: iStock
Laugh so hard that it confuses your “Tormentor.”

A little humor can really go a long way!

Remember, you’re STRONGER than you think.

Source: WEB

For me, whenever I start to feel overwhelmed by the sheer stress of the job, the Holyspirit gently reminds me that…

So I don’t complain, I give thanks.

***

I screen grabbed this from a friend’s status the other day. Truly this job Issa calling! 

Last, last, all of us will be ALRIGHT. 

….
Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::

    ❤️❤️❤️

Housejob Chronicles- 7 Rules For The Naija House Officer!

DISCLAIMER: Shebi you know I’m barely “3 weeks” into this Housejob thing? These are strictly self-made rules o! You don’t need to take them “hook, line and sinker.” Thanking you!😅


***
Dear New Naija House Officer,

Congratulations!

I’m so glad you made it.

You worked so hard to get here, spent countless late nights studying in medical school and slaying all the GIANT exams along the way. 

However, there are new hurdles to cross and your “Housemanship” is one of them.

As a newbie Naija house officer, I’ve put together some really simple suggestions to help you get started and maximize the Housejob experience.

1. Apply yourself. I can’t over emphasize this one. 

And it’s a phrase one of my consultants used while having a conversation with me.



Don’t just count your days, make your days count.

Housejob can be so stressful that you’re in a hurry to complete it. If you’re not careful you’ll just keep counting each day that comes without making the most of it.  

2. Don’t be a fraud i.e. Avoid synthesizing stuff that don’t exist. 

Sadly, I have been a victim and it wasn’t funny. The pressure to impress the “Ogas” can be so real, that you begin to generate values for your patient’s vitals, randomly state their clinical status and so on. 

Don’t say/write what you don’t know, even if it makes you look stupid sometimes. Trust me, you will find yourself in such shoes someday. Let your MOTTO be: “Integrity over Impression.”

Whatever you do be you, but always be a PLUS wherever you go.

{Tip: Have a small notepad and a wristwatch to document everything you do for a patient even when you don’t have access to the case note.}

3. Know your lane and respect others.

You’ll meet many nurses, lab scientists, attendants etc and often the respect you give them, is the respect you get back.
Forget the stereotype rumors you’ve heard. There are nice people (doctors, nurses, security etc) everywhere. And nobody is out to get you if you do what you ought to do well.

4. There’s such a thing as “Hierarchy syndrome.” Don’t be caught in the web.

It’s safer to be on the sidelines. Don’t let anyone belittle or intimidate you. Respect your seniors, but don’t fear them. It only destroys your self-esteem.
Sometimes you really want to help your patient but you can’t do much, because you have some “Ogas” at the top that are ready to ridicule you whether for doing nothing, doing too little or doing too much.

5. Learn all you can, while you possibly can.

From unit posting to unit posting, you’ll be surprised at how quickly the time flies. If you don’t make a conscious effort to learn, you won’t learn a thing. The goal of Housejob is for you to gain a level of independence in medical practice. And achieving that goal largely lies on you.

6. Remember, PATIENTS first. They are the priority of any healthcare institution, and they should be your priority too. 

That’s the reason you’re there in the first place.

So in whatever decision you make, ask yourself “what are my patient’s needs and how can I help to fulfill them“?

7. Just chill, in the end you’ll be alright.

Oh, there’ll be tough days but there’ll also be the not-so-tough ones. Don’t let anyone trick you into believing that everyday you will be called upon to resite IV lines at 1:00 am or to prepare a patient for surgery at 10:00 pm. 

There are days you’ll have few to no patients on the ward, canceled surgeries, missed appointments and so on. When such days come, enjoy them! 

***

As a closing thought, here’s an adapted thought from a fellow blogger (Omooba):

“Don’t let yourself get distracted. FOCUS is a slippery thing. You are going to live long. You are not going to spend even up to a quarter of your life doing HouseJob. Give it your time, and mind. The less things you entertain in your life at a time, the better the overall quality.”

I’ll be honest with you, there are things you love that just have to give up for a while, to be able to maximize this new phase. It might hurt at first, but it’ll be worth it in the end.
So don’t forget the first rule, APPLY YOURSELF!

Here’s wishing you an “extension” and “extra call” free, housemanship year.

Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️