HouseJob Chronicles: What School Did You Finish From?

Hey folks,

First of all, this post is long over due. I’ve being working on the draft since like forever and even abandoned it at some point, cos no time.

So I have had a crazy few days post-leave. I’m so stressed out that I could use another break! Lol.

My face during Intern’s Pre-round…lol

I’m just glad I got to publish this, at last!

The post is especially for, but not limited to the Foreign Trained Doctors (FTDs).

My “brothers and sisters” from the diaspora, welcome back to REAL LIFE- Naija Version!

I’m sending you thousands of cyber hugs that will last you through the first few months of your House Job at least.


If you’ve passed through the MDCN hurdles already, you’d have observed that the system is NOT ready to welcome you with open arms. I’m not even kidding…

If you’re one of those patriotic FTDs (I’m not one btw🙄), who returned with high hopes of contributing your skills and expertise to the expansion of Naija’s health sector; I’m sorry to burst your bubble:

Whatever fancy reasons you had for returning to Naija, no one cares.

It is a sad reality.

But for what it’s worth, there are some great moments too. Like having patients discharged after spending days/weeks in the hospital or hearing an uncooperative patient Left Against Medical Advice (LAMA)…lol. I should do a separate post on that.

Anyhow.

So once you start your house job, expect to feel intimidated by your seniors. Naija doctors love to move STUFF. Eeesh!!

The million-dollar question that got my fellow interns tongue-tied, like we weren’t expecting it…lol! 

It wasn’t a funny scenario but I can laugh it off now.

The “Ogas” at the top love to deliberate on which is the best medical school in Naija, so they keep setting baits for house officers in form of questions, sane or otherwise.

Whether you are foreign trained or locally, you’ll experience this at some point or the other, although the former seem to be more at the receiving end.

Having passed through the initiation process of getting asked the same question multiple times, I have a few tips for upcoming House Officers:


1. OWN your identity.

You’re a MEDICAL DOCTOR, with a CERTIFICATE and a LICENSE.

So wear it like a cape. Be PROUD of it, because it’s who you are.

Embrace it. Love it. Live it.


If you schooled abroad, it was your decision, your money (whether sponsored or not) and your experience. Ditto if you were locally trained.

Even if studying Medicine was a mistake, it was the best mistake of your life.
Don’t let anyone guilt-trip you on it.
2. You have NOTHING to prove.

You heard that right.

There’s NOTHING to prove to anybody.

Not your skills. Not your knowledge. Not your personality.

What you know was enough to get you to this level. And if you build on your knowledge and skills, you can (and will) get better.

Remember, your senior colleagues (Regs, SRs, Consultants) did not get all their medical expertise during their housemanship year.

They earned it with time. Life takes time. 

So while there’s always room for improvement, you have NOTHING to prove.



Remember this.

3. Do it with JOY!

When all is said and done, what really matters is the impact you made wherever you find yourself.

So whatever you do, do it with EXCELLENCE. And COURAGE. And JOY.

Give the kind of care you would like to receive.


Put in your very best at all times, even when it’s hard. It’s okay to feel out of place sometimes but don’t let anyone (not even yourself) hold you back.

***

Image: http://www.eunicesmiles.wordpress.com

I’ve asked myself this question a couple of times, and tried to answer it as sincerely as possible:

My answer is YES.

And to add to that, given similar circumstances in the current Naija, I’d still study abroad and maybe the very school I attended. Tenkiu!



Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::

   ❤️❤️❤️
Disclaimer: All images unless otherwise tagged, were obtained from the WEB.

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Housejob Chronicles- 7 Rules For The Naija House Officer!

DISCLAIMER: Shebi you know I’m barely “3 weeks” into this Housejob thing? These are strictly self-made rules o! You don’t need to take them “hook, line and sinker.” Thanking you!😅


***
Dear New Naija House Officer,

Congratulations!

I’m so glad you made it.

You worked so hard to get here, spent countless late nights studying in medical school and slaying all the GIANT exams along the way. 

However, there are new hurdles to cross and your “Housemanship” is one of them.

As a newbie Naija house officer, I’ve put together some really simple suggestions to help you get started and maximize the Housejob experience.

1. Apply yourself. I can’t over emphasize this one. 

And it’s a phrase one of my consultants used while having a conversation with me.



Don’t just count your days, make your days count.

Housejob can be so stressful that you’re in a hurry to complete it. If you’re not careful you’ll just keep counting each day that comes without making the most of it.  

2. Don’t be a fraud i.e. Avoid synthesizing stuff that don’t exist. 

Sadly, I have been a victim and it wasn’t funny. The pressure to impress the “Ogas” can be so real, that you begin to generate values for your patient’s vitals, randomly state their clinical status and so on. 

Don’t say/write what you don’t know, even if it makes you look stupid sometimes. Trust me, you will find yourself in such shoes someday. Let your MOTTO be: “Integrity over Impression.”

Whatever you do be you, but always be a PLUS wherever you go.

{Tip: Have a small notepad and a wristwatch to document everything you do for a patient even when you don’t have access to the case note.}

3. Know your lane and respect others.

You’ll meet many nurses, lab scientists, attendants etc and often the respect you give them, is the respect you get back.
Forget the stereotype rumors you’ve heard. There are nice people (doctors, nurses, security etc) everywhere. And nobody is out to get you if you do what you ought to do well.

4. There’s such a thing as “Hierarchy syndrome.” Don’t be caught in the web.

It’s safer to be on the sidelines. Don’t let anyone belittle or intimidate you. Respect your seniors, but don’t fear them. It only destroys your self-esteem.
Sometimes you really want to help your patient but you can’t do much, because you have some “Ogas” at the top that are ready to ridicule you whether for doing nothing, doing too little or doing too much.

5. Learn all you can, while you possibly can.

From unit posting to unit posting, you’ll be surprised at how quickly the time flies. If you don’t make a conscious effort to learn, you won’t learn a thing. The goal of Housejob is for you to gain a level of independence in medical practice. And achieving that goal largely lies on you.

6. Remember, PATIENTS first. They are the priority of any healthcare institution, and they should be your priority too. 

That’s the reason you’re there in the first place.

So in whatever decision you make, ask yourself “what are my patient’s needs and how can I help to fulfill them“?

7. Just chill, in the end you’ll be alright.

Oh, there’ll be tough days but there’ll also be the not-so-tough ones. Don’t let anyone trick you into believing that everyday you will be called upon to resite IV lines at 1:00 am or to prepare a patient for surgery at 10:00 pm. 

There are days you’ll have few to no patients on the ward, canceled surgeries, missed appointments and so on. When such days come, enjoy them! 

***

As a closing thought, here’s an adapted thought from a fellow blogger (Omooba):

“Don’t let yourself get distracted. FOCUS is a slippery thing. You are going to live long. You are not going to spend even up to a quarter of your life doing HouseJob. Give it your time, and mind. The less things you entertain in your life at a time, the better the overall quality.”

I’ll be honest with you, there are things you love that just have to give up for a while, to be able to maximize this new phase. It might hurt at first, but it’ll be worth it in the end.
So don’t forget the first rule, APPLY YOURSELF!

Here’s wishing you an “extension” and “extra call” free, housemanship year.

Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️

Housejob Chronicles- GOALS!

Hey folks,

So since starting this housejob thingy, I’ve been working roughly 12-15 HOURS a day, for 7 DAYS a week! (no kidding)

But I am not complaining, because FOR THIS JOB, I prayed. Haha…

Thankful this is NOT my portion…loool😂
Btw, Lokoja is a lovely place to live in, minus the “hot weather” and the “water-rationing” (one of the things I miss about home)…haha.

Everywhere I go, people have been kind to me. From my Uncle’s family that currently hosts me, to random people giving me rides or buying me snacks. Even most of the nurses, doctors and patients’ caregivers I have met have been nice.
Also I’ve met some of my Kinsfolk (one from Magongo, two from Ogori)and what a joy it was to communicate in our local dialect.

Anyway, as per Housejob, I was told that my department (surgery) is the toughest so to speak (followed by ObGyn, Paeds & Int Med- I suppose), and my unit (Paediatric Surgery) is relatively a “soft-landing” i.e. we are in an off-season atm, with only about 20% of our patients requiring critical care. 
My first call was smooth. I was summoned just twice (one case of AUR, one case of Fever) so I grabbed a couple hours of sweet sleep.

I’m thankful that I still have “windows of time” to do the things I really enjoy doing-Reading, Blogging, Spanish tutorials, Music and the likes.

Because not every time work, sometimes flexing.

I’m learning to make the most of the opportunities I get to relax and be as productive as possible rather than just while away on social media or with random gists.

I love this phrase:

So I’ve come up with a number of goals that I hope to achieve by the end of my housemanship year. (Thanks to one of the speakers at the ARD house officers welcoming). Here it goes: 
5 Deliveries 

– 5 NGT Insertions

– 5 Skin Suturing

-10 DREs

-15 VEs

-15 Urinary Catheterizations

-20 IV line setting

-25 Venepunctures

Total Procedures: 100.

Succeeded in : 0😂

Attempts: 2 Venepunctures, 2 IV lines (flat veins syndrome), 1 urinary catheterization (assisted), 1 skin suturing (no stamina to push in the needle😭).

I’m sharing this, because at the end of my Housejob sojourn I’d like to compare notes and see how far I’ve gone. 
And I hope to write more about the Housejob as it progresses.

So help me God.

My Housejob face…lol
Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::

💕💕💕

GONE TOO SOON!

Over time, I’ve realized that my most profound moments from medical school had little to do with the “books” but everything to do with the “lives” especially of the patients I encountered on the ward.

Today’s post is from an experience I had as a medical student rotating on the pediatric ward.

Enjoy!


I walked into the ward that morning and noticed most of the staff were speaking in hushed tones.
Ward round went on as usual, but everyone seemed a little reserved. Soon, the cat was let out of the bag- one of our patients had passed on!

I was stunned.

Such a young, peaceful and innocent-looking boy, not more than eleven. He had been on the ward for sometime and because his diagnosis wasn’t straight forward, we kept running series of tests.

Then the doctor decided to place him on some steroids and his symptoms seemed to improve, so he was discharged.
However, he soon began to deteriorate rapidly that he had to be re-admitted, eventually leading to his demise.

It was particularly sad for me because that was the first patient I knew as a medical student that passed on.

I remember the day he asked me to pass him a bottle of water from his bedside cabinet. “Miss, Miss…” was how he began his request. After passing him the water, I watched him for a few moments before going back to what I was doing.

If only I knew that was the last time I would be able to interact with him,

Maybe I would have held one of his hands, looked into his eyes and told him not to be afraid.

Maybe I would have sang him a song, written him a poem, or read him a book.

Maybe I would have asked him to tell me about his family, his friends at school, and all of his favorite things.

Maybe I would have assured him that despite his pain, there was a Father in heaven who cared so much about him- spirit, soul and body.

Maybe I would have just taken a few minutes right there, to say a word of prayer for him. 

If only I knew…

But I didn’t.

Because I wasn’t expecting him to die, at least not that soon.

Weak and wasted as he was, we still held on to the hope that he would live.

But death gave no notice of its intentions, it came and left without restrictions.

Three years later, my heart still bleeds when I remember the incident-though I didn’t shed a single tear at that time.

The rest of my sojourn through medical school came with its own heartaches as several other patients I met passed away, but I still can’t get that very first experience out of my head.

As a closing thought, it’s funny how we take the little things for granted, especially with the people that matter to us the most thinking they will always be around.

Truth is, when it comes to those we care about, death is always too soon.

The good news for the believer though, is that death is not the end, there is life after death.

And that for me, is such a comforting thought.

***

So when was the first time you saw a patient die? And how did you react to it?

:::requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️

#TrueLifeStories #WardChronicles #PatientSeries

WHY YOU LEARN THE WAY YOU LEARN.


During my undergraduate days, I had a classmate who often requested for my “jotter” a few days to our exams. According to him, I knew how to summarize and simplify my notes in such a way that anyone reading would understand. And I believe he had a point.

The first I heard of a learning model was from a friend, a couple of years back. He enlightened me on the difference between VISUAL and AURAL learners, and encouraged me to apply that to how I studied. Unfortunately, I didn’t give it much attention at that time.

Many years later, I would come across the V.A.R.K model of learning and found it quite enlightening.

In any classroom setting, from elementary level to postgraduate level, students receive, retain and retrieve information in different ways. And I believe medical students especially, would benefit from knowing how the learning models work since there’s so much to cover and so little time.

According to the VARK model, there are four types of learners:


1. VISUAL Learners.

I call them “The Scanners.”

These are the model students, especially in a traditional school setting. They don’t just read to comprehend, but seem to possess the so-called “Photographic Memory” and can reproduce the pages of their lecture notes or textbooks, word for word (sometimes with particular page numbers, no kidding!).

They enjoy studying long and hard, retaining most of the information they come across. They especially do well with Charts, Graphs and other Pictorial aids.

One morning while in medical school, we were having a discussion on the ward, and one of my colleagues was asked a question. When he started talking, it was as though an encyclopedia had been opened inside his brain. He just kept stating all the facts and figures while the rest of us gaped…lol.
Afterwards, our consultant looked at him and smiled, stating that he had a photographic memory and she knew he could actually picture the things he was saying. Needless to say, that colleague of mine was one of the smartest students in medical school.

2. AURAL Learners.

Aural learners are also known as AUDIO learners but I prefer to call them “The Crammers.

These are the students who simply pay attention during classes (with/without taking notes) and retain most of the information long afterwards. Some simply “Memorize and Recite” (i.e. CRAM) their notes and they are good to go.
Unlike the VISUAL learners, they don’t really need to study for long, although having group discussions are of great benefit. Still, a lot of them do well with last minute studying.

I had a roommate who would memorize several pages of her notes on the morning of an exam, and her results usually came out so well.
Another friend of mine who is now a doctor, said she only needed to attend (and listen well) in class, and without further reading, she would be able to sit for any exam. When I heard that, my respect for her grew by several inches…haha.

If I’m being honest I doze off or day-dream during classes more times than I’d like to admit. Long lectures are like music to my ears, and I often start drifting off before I catch myself.

3. READ & WRITE Learners.

I call them “The Stenographers.

This kind of learners love to copy everything that is said during a lecture. They afterwards go home to “READ and DIGEST” their notes, often breaking the notes into simpler and condensed versions to understand them better.

Such learners also appreciate Highlights, Mnemonics, Power Points and Summaries. Their goal is to be able to comprehend the material in its simplest form.

I happen to belong to this category of learners. I’m a COPIER by default and the only way I remember things (from class and especially in church) is by taking down notes. Even when there’s nothing to write, I doodle in my notebook, else my mind wanders off.

I remember one time a lecturer gave an impromptu test, immediately after his lecture, and I barely passed though I was sitting right there in the class. The reason was simple, I did not have enough time to “process” the information he had given before the test. In such scenarios, I rely more on residual knowledge.

For me, reading, then writing down notes, enhances comprehension. And if I’m reading something I don’t understand, I try to look it up, otherwise, I skip it.

4. KINESTHETIC Learners

I call them “The Demonstrators.

When it comes to learning, they are more practical than theoretically-inclined. These are the so-called Hands-on-Students.

In medical school they find most lectures boring, but rush off to dissect every cadaver that comes into the anatomy lab. When they start their clerkships, they can’t wait to examine every patient, set lines and insert urinary catheters. Ask them to state the differentials for a neck swelling and they draw a blank, but ask them to scrub in for a Thyroidectomy and they jump right in! 

***
What about HYBRIDS?

I believe most students learn by a combination of two or more of the learning models.

Personally, I learn the most by Association i.e. connecting multiple dots together. So it’s a little bit of what I see, what I hear and most of what I read. I’m not much of a hands-on-learner though. And it usually takes me twice the time my contemporaries take to learn a skill, whether it’s cooking Jollofrice or inserting a Urinary catheter! 😂

***

Do you know what learning model (or combination) you use the most?

Cheers!


Sources:

http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/whats_their_learning_style_part_2_kinesthetic_learners
http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/whats_their_learning_style_part_1_auditory_learners

:::requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️

6 Types of Medical Students

Disclaimer: This post is on a VERY light note and all characters in it are entirely fictional.

If you’ve been in medical school long enough, you’ll find out that each medical student you meet is different from the next. Knowing this provides you with a balanced perspective in approaching medical school and helps you to set realistic expectations for yourself. 

Please note that the humor and  sarcasm in the labels are a bit exaggerated and the list is by no means exclusive. 

Enjoy!

1. The Bookworm/Silent Genius

A.K.A The Nerd.

(S)he is your average Joe, who sits in a corner of the lecture room or at the very front to avoid any form of distraction. (S)he hardly talks in class unless asked a question.

Bookworms may be loners or friendly, depending on their personalities.

Credit: 123RF

The school library is usually their second home and they would often stay back after school hours and on weekends to study.
If you need someone to put you through the Kreb’s Cycle the night before your Biochemistry test, just call a friend, sorry, nerd.

Interestingly, a nerd’s life is not only about medical school and studying. Some have remarkable interests in art, photography, music, nature, or poetry.

As expected, the nerd is likely to be the class valedictorian.

2. The Popular Student/Party-goer

Every class has a Chris (or Chrissa).

That one person who seems to be friends with everybody (or who everyone says “hello” to). Like a magnet pulling objects towards its core, they can’t help but draw attention to themselves.

Chrissa is the fashionista who is up-to-date with her weaves, makeup and accessories. Chrissa would rather finish a season of Grey’s Anatomy than study for her Anatomy test over the weekend.

Chris is the cool dude with the latest ride, phone and wristwatch. He even wears designer shoes. He is also an unrepentant sports fan and doesn’t mind skipping a class or two to watch a game.

Both thrive on fun and have activities planned for every weekday and weekend. They know every interesting place there is in town and often find time to steal away for out-of-town adventures.

As a rule the popular guys are “book-smart” and manage to keep up with their studies, with some performing quite exceptionally.

3. The Activist/Politician
This is Bill.

He is on the face of every bill board in the school.

Bill participates in most, if not all, student events and plays active roles in the student government. He is eager to stand up for (or against) a cause and easily draws a large following.

Bill is also quick to point out the inefficiencies of the school administration as well as unfair student policies, and mobilizes other students into signing petitions.
If you need something done, all you need is to get Bill involved.

Bill is sometimes unlucky enough to get into conflict with the school advisory committee and may even suffer some setbacks academically.

But Bill doesn’t mind, he will do anything for the cause of justice even if it means getting expelled from medical school.


Bill
as we know, is likely to run for Global President, a decade from now and we ALL would vote for him.

4. The Nervous wreck/”Water-works” Student

Lisa is fidgety and cries a lot.

She cries at the beginning of the semester on merely seeing the class timetable.

She cries before every test, not knowing if she would do her best.
She cries after every test, not knowing if she has done her best.


Lisa
is often the last to check the score board and needs the support of a friend or two, to do that.

Credit: Quickmeme.com
She cries if she fails the test, she always knew she would.
She cries if she passes the test, she thinks it’s a narrow escape.

This kind of student needs lots of reassurance from time to time.
It’s not unusual to find her malingering and having to reschedule her tests/exams a few times.

Sometimes, Lisa needs more than a box of Kleenex and a shoulder to cry upon. If she has other psychological issues, she might benefit from seeing a therapist.

5. The Indifferent/Absentee Student

We’ll call him Fred.

Fred hardly shows up in class. And when he does, he is late and never stays until the end.

In fact half of the time Fred is in class, he is on his mobile phone texting or playing a game. And weird enough, the lecturers don’t seem to mind.

As a rule, he is the last to get to the exam hall and always the first to leave.

He never stays around long enough to strike a conversation with anybody and isn’t known to hang out with any friends outside school.

He is such a recluse that nobody really knows where he lives and whether he is a real student or a “phony student” sent in by the CIA.

To add to the mystery, Fred stops coming to school after 1 or 2 semesters.

Maybe Fred was never a student after all! 

6. The Know-It-All/Competitive Student

Meet Maria.
Maria is a smart but bossy student who likes to intimidate others with her smartness.

She claims to know everything there is to know about everything there is to know.

In every class, the Pathology lecturer tells her to wait until the next class before he answers her question- which just happens to be the next topic!

Maria chairs the table in every Anatomy lab session and believes that her dissecting skills are second only to that of the Anatomy Professor.

She dominates every group work and outshines others in every seminar presentation.

To her credit, Maria knows how to go the extra, extra mile in getting whatever task she’s given. No wonder, she’s every teacher’s favorite student.

Credit: 123RF


Maria strives to know the test scores of all the students in class and gives a cold shoulder to anyone who performs slightly better than her.

***

What type of medical student would you say you are (were)?

I would say I was almost nerdish (“almost” because sometimes I’m in class supposedly paying rapt attention, but my mind is 10000 miles away 🙈🙈).

***

:::requine:::
❤️❤️❤️

50 Practical Ways To Stay Motivated In Medical School (A Recap):

Here’s a recap of the 50 Practical Ways you can motivate yourself through medical school. Feel free to check the links at the end. 


1. Discover yourself
2. Learn new skills
3. Take online courses
4. Avoid negative self-talk
5. Volunteer
6. Listen to good music
7. Watch Medical Shows
8. Start your own business
9. Keep a journal


10. Keep the end in mind
11. Find a mentor
12. Medical school is just a phase. It won’t last forever.
13. Quitting is not an option.
14. Cultivate healthy friendships


15. Find what works for you and make it work
16. Remember why you started
17. Expectations from Friends and Family
18. Eat healthy
19. Focus on becoming competent vs just getting good grades
20. Listen to podcasts
21. Don’t lose your Passion
22. Set Priorities And Rewards
23. Don’t sweat the small stuff


24. Faith in God
25. Set simple goals and achieve them
26. Be your greatest cheerleader
27. Learn to unwind
28. Volunteer to teach others
29. Seek help when you need it


30. You are not alone
30. Play Stimulating Games
31. Stay Focused
33. Ask Questions
34. Aim For Excellent Grades
35. Enjoy the learning process
36. Think Medicine, Think Prestige
37. Believe you can make a difference
38. Financial Sacrifices And Future Remunerations


39. Don’t Quit
40. Take it one step at a time
41. Start a Countdown
42. Share Your Story
43. Have a bucket list
44. Contribute on Social Media
45. Sleep well
46. Work It Out
47. Meditate
48. Cheer as others win


49. Reflect
50. Live, Learn, Love. Repeat.

***

50 Practical Ways To Stay In Medical School (Part 1)

50 Practical Ways To Stay In Medical School (Part 2)

– 50 Practical Ways To Stay Motivated In Medical School (Part 3)

50 Practical Ways To Stay In Medical School (Part 4)

50 Practical Ways To Stay In Medical School (Part 5)



Cheers,

:::requ1ne:::

❤️❤️❤️

5 Tips To Having Better Grades in Medical School

The greatest fear of medical students in any part of the globe is to fail out of medical school. With the overwhelming workload, many students simply strive to stay above average rather than set unrealistic expectations.

While making good grades is not all there is to becoming a successful doctor, it definitely helps to get you started on the journey.

||My Story||

I remember the first set of exams I wrote in my second semester of medical school. Out of four courses, I FAILED two.

Physiology and Neuroanatomy!

And every medical student knows how important both courses are.
I was really devastated because my marks were not even close to the cutoff.
The day the results were released, one of my professors called me into his office and gave me a stern talking to.

What’s wrong with you? You’re better than this!”

It was with teary eyes and a puffy face that I left his office that day, and I couldn’t get over the encounter for the rest of the week.
Thankfully, I got another chance to make up before my finals and that was the beginning of a turnaround in my medical school journey; as far as my grades were concerned.
These are some of the tips that worked for me:

Tip 1 ||START WITH A PLAN||

A common adage says, “To fail to prepare is to prepare to fail.”

This is the first step in achieving any major goal in life and it holds true for getting good grades in medical school as well.
Success is not a function of chance but a combination of:
* Diligence,
* Discipline, and
* Determination.
Having a plan helps to build a framework for these vital ingredients.

Here are practical ways to help you prepare for a new semester:

> Get old notes, recommended textbooks and other relevant study resources. 

> Get your class timetable and make your own study timetable.

> Know the number of credits for each subject and how to calculate your CGPA.

> Write down your academic goals for the semester.

Image credit: WEB
Recommended: Picmonic

Tip 2 ||DEFINE SUCCESS AND WORK TOWARDS IT||

What does success in medical school mean to you? Is it getting pass grades in all your subjects, having a number of distinctions or making it to the Dean’s list?

Your success is your RESPONSIBILITY. The earlier you acknowledge that, the easier it’ll be to work towards it. And it all begins in your mind.

That semester I failed two subjects ended up being one of my best ever, not only did I get distinctions in 3 out of 4 subjects, I also made the Dean’s list.

I got to know later that some students in my class also failed the same subjects I did at the start of the semester, but not all of them aimed to get distinctions in the final exams.
My point is, if your desire is to get an A, then go for it. Ditto a B or C.



Caption this: Success is a marathon and not a sprint!

Tip 3 ||GO THE EXTRA-MILE||

Now that you have a plan and the desired goal(s), put in the required efforts. Make the necessary sacrifices. Burn the midnight oil if you have to.

For me that meant staying back in school late to study, attending extra classes on Saturdays, and so on.
The truth is, you can’t win the prize without paying a price.

To earn good grades, you don’t just need to work HARDER, you need to work SMARTER.

Studying in Medical school sometimes requires a level of creativity.

I remember watching lots of animated videos to really grasp some concepts in Genetics after several failed attempts to comprehend the lecture notes.
There are as many methods to study as there are resources out there to choose from.

Also Read: 7 Strategies For Studying In Medical School

Tip 4 ||QUIT WORRYING AND KEEP STUDYING||

So what if you are putting in the required efforts, and it appears you’re still not getting the desired results?
Pray.
And confess the scriptures.
As a Christian, I know that asking people to “stop worrying and just pray,” sounds cliché.

But PRAYER works.

Fear is a tool by the enemy to demoralize you and no matter how much you try to work hard, worrying will always stop you short from reaching your desired goal(s).
In prayer, you can also ask God for wisdom and he’s ever ready to show you what to do.

“But if any of you lack wisdom, you should pray to God, who will give it to you; because God gives generously and graciously to all.”
James 1:5 GNB

Maybe you need to study earlier in the day rather than later, or you need to study with a friend rather than alone, maybe you even need to take audio notes instead of writing in class.
I have learnt that worrying about poor grades won’t make you perform any better. So why worry, when you can pray?
And after praying get right back to STUDYING.

Tip 5 ||DON’T GO SOLO||

I can’t overemphasize this.
Be accountable. It is true that your success is your responsibility, but there are people who are willing to show you the ropes if you ask them.
Learn to ask questions not only from your colleagues but also from students who are in classes ahead of you. If you have some particular difficulties, see your course adviser or school counselor.
Also, many students resent failure so much that they fail to find out why they failed the first time and how to go about it.

I have learnt that failure is an opportunity to learn and do better, so I need to make conscious effort not just to GO THROUGH the experience but to GROW through it.

I hope these tips are of help.

To Your Success!
:::requine:::
❤️❤️❤️

50 Practical Ways To Stay Motivated In Medical School (Part 5)

You can read the previous part here

41. Start a Countdown:

Like in any major event of life, finishing medical school is a big deal. Going through it can be as exciting too. One way is to have countdowns for each stage of medical school like the White Coat Ceremony, Starting/Completing Clinical Postings and of course Finals! Looking forward to the BIG DAYS was another major way I stayed motivated throughout medical school. So start the countdown now! 

42. Share Your Story:

Sharing one’s story has such a powerful effect not only on the audience but also on the individual. There’s a uniqueness to your journey that only you can talk about: your fears, victories, and everything in between have contributed to who you are at the moment. So why not take the time to share your story and inspire several upcoming medical students out there. 

No matter how many medical school blogs or YouTube channels are out there, yours can still stand out to a specific audience.

And if you’re concerned about your privacy or security, you have the option of sharing your story anonymously. 

Recommended: How to start a YouTube Channel

Recommended: How to start a blog (WordPress)

43. Have a bucket list: 


Why do I need a bucket list?” you may be wondering. Well, being in medical school is a great opportunity for you to take on new dreams and go on adventures- because whether you like it or not, you still have the time. You don’t have to wait until you’re 40 before you start living the real life.

Maybe you’ve always wanted to learn how to swim or go on a fancy boat cruise or get a massage session in a spa. Well, who says you can’t?

Just start with what is within your financial means and soon you’ll be surprised at how many things you’ve achieved before you complete medical school.

44. Contribute on Social Media:

As a medical student, you are a stakeholder in the health concerns of the communities you belong to, whether physically or virtually. Several people are on the lookout for the right information regarding their health.

So creating a Health Awareness page on Facebook or sharing health tips on Twitter, can help to promote a healthy culture among the people in your sphere of influence. Remember you don’t need to have all the answers and where you’re not sure, just ask them to see a doctor.

45. Sleep well: 

Some days, all you really need is a good night’s sleep. Make it a habit to sleep well everyday. An average medical student runs on less than 5 hours of sleep everyday, which is way below the daily requirement of 8 hours of sleep. 

Read: 11 Surprising Health Benefits of Sleep

If you have problems tracking the number of hours you sleep each night, you can try using a sleep app.

Recommended:
8 top-rated apps that can help you get a better night’s sleep

46. Work it out: 

It’s amazing how pushing oneself to the physical limit often stretches one’s mental capacity as well. A simple morning jog or rope skipping if you prefer, will make a difference in your outlook for the day. Not considering the health impact it would have on your body in the long run. So make it a habit to Work Out, your body and brain need it. 

Recommended: SWORKIT APP

47. Meditate: 
Meditation is another great way to reduce the stress that comes with medical school. Take a few minutes off to unwind and practice some mindfulness techniques each day and begin to enjoy some amazing benefits.

Recommended: 5 Mindfulness Apps worthy of your attention 

48. Cheer as others win: 
Celebrating others as they complete medical school, take licensing exams and start their residency programs, is another good way to motivate you for the remaining stretch of your medical school journey. When you see those ahead of you achieving their dreams, it boosts your confidence in pursuing yours. 

49. Reflect:

To reflect means to step out of the picture and go down the “memory lane” a few times. Reflection helps you to review the decisions you’ve made in the past, your failures and successes, your strengths and weaknesses, and to take note of all the  major contribution to your past achievements.

Knowing what has motivated you in the past, gives you some perspective in staying presently motivated.

50. Live, Learn, Love and Repeat:


Above everything else, see Life as a gift. Learn to treasure every moment of it no matter how challenging it may seem sometimes. 

Be grateful for the little things and bigger things will come your way.

Remember, Medical school is a privilege and not a right. So live joyfully, learn passionately and love deliberately. 

Cheers, 

:::requ1ne:::

❤️❤️❤️

50 Practical Ways To Stay Motivated In Medical School (Part 4)

You can read the previous part here.

31. Play Stimulating Games:

It’s amazing how overcoming small challenges, even virtual ones, can motivate us to face real life situations.
In a particular semester in medical school, I became almost addicted to “Candy Crush” and jokingly told myself that if I could beat a certain level in the game, no subject was too difficult for me to handle. Amazingly, I went on to have some of my best results that semester.
Thankfully, there are a variety of medical games that not only help students to unwind, but also improve medical knowledge remarkably.

Recommended:
ClinicalSense
Prognosis

It’s also possible for you and your friends, to make up random games on the go, for instance, naming medical conditions that start with letter A or try to play Scrabble with the medical dictionary as a guide or have an Anatomy Challenge, where you only speak in anatomically terms for a whole day. I can bet it’ll be fun.

32. Stay Focused:

No matter what happens around you, don’t lose your primary focus for being in medical school- LEARNING! 

It is easy to get distracted by other things, social media for instance, but most of these distractions are avoidable.

The rule of thumb is, if something can wait, let it wait. It takes a lot of discipline to achieve that, but soon it becomes a habit.

Distractions are like leaking holes in a pipe, too many of them will jeopardize your journey in the long run; so you must be wary.

It’s important to remind yourself each day about your Priorities/Goals and a good way to achieve that is to create a personalized Vision Board.





Recommended
: Making Vision Boards Work For You  (Terri Savelle Foy)

Also Read: How to avoid distractions in College

33. Ask questions:
Nothing is more powerful as a tool of for learning, than asking questions.”- Myles Munroe.

Asking questions, especially from those who have gone ahead, provides you with more opportunities to learn even outside the classroom. The wells of experience from senior colleagues will not only equip you with the courage to face some of your worst fears but also the wisdom to avoid some costly mistakes.

 

 

There are enough answers if only you ask the right questions – REQUINE.

 

So quit trying to figure out everything on your own. Just ask away!

34. Aim for excellent grades:

While getting good grades isn’t all there is to medical school, it certainly helps to boost your morale when you find out that you got an A in the Genetics exam, or your name was on the dean’s list four semesters in a row with a scholarship to complete your studies.

Getting an AWARD for your hardwork definitely motivates you to do more! 

35. Enjoy the Learning process:

Remember how eager you were to know the alphabets and engage in other learning activities as a pre-school toddler?

Like most kids that age, learning was fun. Unfortunately, many students lose that excitement as they get older. If all you think of is how to graduate from medical school, you won’t get the best out of it.

To have a fulfilling career, you need to cultivate the habit of enjoying the learning process. Doctors are life-long learners!

Be an active learner by applying something you’re taught in your interactions/activities each day. Let your knowledge be an investment into the future, generations will thank you for it.

Also Read: 7 Strategies For Studying In Medical School

36. Think Medicine, Think Prestige: 

We all know that Medicine as a career, is both prestigious and lucrative. Here’s what one medical doctor says, “The associated prestige from non-medics was pretty cool that I didn’t wanna lose that.”

Perhaps among your childhood friends/immediate family, you’re the first to get into med school. Think of all those looking upto you and how much value you will add to the society.

37. Believe you can make a difference:

Have you ever asked yourself if you can make any real difference in the field of Medicine? The truth is, you can.

Think of the hundreds/thousands of patients (and their relatives) that’ll come your way in the course of your career, and if you’re more inclined to research, imagine the groundbreaking discoveries you can make in Medicine. Also think of how you can inspire the next generation positively whether in the classroom or on the ward.

38. Financial Sacrifices And Future Remuneration: 

Think of medical school as an investment. Most people put in lots of money whether through student loans, scholarships, personal savings or family support into financing their medical education. In most countries, medical education is more expensive than the average college degree, so you don’t want all the money spent to be a waste. The good thing though is that you are likely going to be overcompensated for every penny you put in.

39. Don’t Quit:

Dropping out of medical school, means you’re going to start all over, whatever else you choose to do.” says one Doctor.  While quitting isn’t always a negative thing to do, the thought of losing all the time/energy you put into medical school can be really frustrating. So why not take the bull by the horns and keep at it?

40. Take it one step at a time:
One of my top secrets of passing through medical school with minimal emotional breakdown was learning to take each moment/challenge one step after the other. Before I knew it I was counting the Months/Weeks/Days to my finals. There were lots of giants to slay along the way, tests, exams and more, but knowing that one step in the right direction will take me closer to my goal, I was motivated me to keep moving. In the end, the journey was so worth it!

More tips to stay motivated through med school? Please share.

Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::