The Girl’s Guide|| Beauty Care Corner.

Hey Ladies,

Welcome back to the Girl’s Guide.

In this post I’ll be reviewing and rating some of the beauty products (and toiletries) I currently use and also recommending a few of them.

I’d love your feedbacks and recommendations. 

PS: This is NOT a sponsored post by the way.

Enjoy! 

***

1. Kotex panty liners* 




Price: N330 – N350

Rating: 4/5

I’ve tried other brands but I always come back to this. It’s feather-light and fits into my underwear easily plus the fragrance is so mild that you’d hardly notice it. 

2. Always ultra sanitary pads* 




Price
: N650 – N700

Rating: 4.5/5

This is one of the oldest products I’ve used (over 15 years), it’s a bit pricey compared to others but the quality is super.

I especially like how the brand comes in different packages (wingless, heavy flow etc) designed for individual comfort. 

I should become an Always Ambassador someday…lol. 

#TeamAlways


3. Joy body lotion*


Price: N/A

Rating: 4/5

Decided to try this product last year after randomly picking it off the shelf of a store and I’ve had no regrets. 

I enjoy how soft and soothing it feels on my skin, and it works well for my complexion too.


4. Vaseline blue seal 

Price: N180 – N250

Rating: 4/5

This is another product I’ve used for many years. 

As someone who has a dry skin that whitens out easily, it’s not enough to use a lotion to moisturize my skin, I also have to use an oil based ointment to coat it.

5. Izzi body mist* 

Price: N830 – N850

Rating: 4.5/5

I started using this product about 2 months ago and I absolutely love it. 

It comes in different fragrances and leaves you sweet and fresh all day.


6. Nivea deodorant*

Price: N/A

Rating: 4/5

I’m quite particular about the brand of deodorant I wear because a person’s smell is often the first thing I notice about them (I assume it’s the same for most people too).

For me “you smell nice” is a compliment not an insult.

I like this particular deodorant spray because it’s mild on the nostrils, yet the fragrance lasts almost an entire day. 


7. Sure antiperspirant

Price: N/A

Rating: 3.5/5

I used to be a sworn lover of antiperspirant roll-ons until late last year when I began to react (?contact dermatitis) to a particular brand, so these days I use them sparingly. 

This product has a sweet feminine fragrance that helps you feel refreshed. 


8. Oriflame foot cream


Price: N3500

Rating: 2.5/5

Earlier this year I noticed I was having calluses on my heels because I wasn’t paying so much attention to foot care.

Not long after someone marketed this product to me and it found it really effective though I wish it wasn’t so expensive.

I love the balmy sensation the lotion gives my feet but I don’t care much for the grainy feel it has. 


9. Beauty formula detox cleanser*

Price: N1000 – N1200

Rating: 4/5

This is one of the top beauty products I’ve used this year. 

I picked it off the shelf a few months ago, because I was repeatedly having annoying breakouts on my face which I attributed to work-related stress. 

And this face cleanser worked wonders. I love everything from its fragrance to the gentle, soft, feel on my skin. 

The major downside to this product for me is that it makes my face dry out before the next morning. 


10. Active Woman body spray 

Price: N900 – N1000

Rating: 4/5

I started using this product over a year ago and I enjoy its soft feminine fragrance which is so unlike many other brands that are not as gentle on the nostrils. 


11. Efactory foot soak 



Price: N830 – N850

Rating: 3/5

This is another product that has really helped in my foot care journey.  

It soothes and softens my soles until they feel as new as a baby’s. 


12. Motflix baby wipes 

Price: N440 – N470

Rating: 3/5

Baby wipes have been my thing for a while now, I chiefly use them to wipe off the makeup on my face after a long day.

I am still trying out different brands to see which one suits my skin best. 

I tried this product for the first time because it was pocket friendly compared to the ones I’ve used in the past. 

The only downside was the flap on the lid that wore off quickly so the wipes dried out after some time..arrrgh. 


13. Above oil sheen hair spray

Price: N900 – N1100

Rating: 3/5

I’ve been using this oil based hair spray for a while now.

It helps to keep my hair shining and prevents my scalp from drying out too quickly especially when I’m wearing braids.

My only challenge with the product is that it stings my nose so I end up coughing practically every time I use it.


14. Enchanteur romantic deo spray 


It turned out I’ve changed my mind about this product 🙈😂


Price: N/A

Rating: 2.5/5

Something made me buy this product, I can’t tell what it was. 

As it turns out I’m not a fan of the fragrance cos it’s neither here nor there.

The other day I wore it at work, and a colleague entered my office and teased me about the “powerful scent” so I’ve used it sparingly since then. 


15. Soulmate hair cream

Price: N/A

Rating: 1.5/5

This hair cream is said to have anti-dandruff properties, but I found it disappointing after using the product for a while then took out my hair to discover lots and lots of dandruff. Sighs.

I also didn’t enjoy the greasiness and yellowish spots the cream left in my hair. 

I’ve officially switched to using natural Shea butter as my hair cream, and hopefully I’ll review that some other time. 


16. Extra hold styling gel spray

Price: N/A

Rating: 2.5/5

This product both styles and conditions the hair. 

I especially use it when I twist out my natural hair cos it keeps it moisturized.

17. Premier body soap*

Price: N/A


Rating
: 4/5

Dis soap ehn, na the best Naija brand, take am or leave am. 

On a serious note, of all the toilet soaps I’ve tried, Premier soap has topped the chart and it’s not just about the lasting fragrance, I’ve also noticed that it is sensitive for my skin type.

18. Closeup herbal toothpaste 

Price: N300-350

Rating: 3/5

My mum started to promote this brand back home and I simply followed suit. I like it because it doesn’t leave an aftertaste and it removes at least 70% of the plaque on my teeth.

***

PS: All * products are highly recommended and quoted prices are subject to change. 

Have you used any of these products? 

What beauty products do you currently use and recommend? Please let me know in the comments box.

Thank you for reading!

:::requ1ne:::

    ❤️❤️❤️

Book Review|| The Smart Money Woman

Author: Arese Ugwu

Genre: Personal Finance

||How I came across the book 

For some reasons, many people seemed to be talking a lot about this book and I became curious. Then one day someone shared it in one of my online groups, and I literally jumped at it.

||Expectations

As an intending millionaire, I wanted to know the choices that make a woman financially smart.  

||Lessons

Most of the lessons shared in this book are profound. I especially love the definition of the smart money woman. 

The smart money woman is a woman whose hustle has purpose and has learnt to make money, keep money and grow money.

She is a woman who has found her calling in life, something that matches her passion with her skill set and, regardless of where she is in that process, she is excited and confident that she will make money because she has positioned herself for success and she knows this is where she can maximize her earning potential.


  • Introduction:

– In general, as African women, we are not taught in any formal framework how to keep money or grow it—basic personal finance skills are difficult to learn. 

– Even when a young adult starts earning more than they need to survive, they end up living from paycheque to paychequebecause  they think about their incomes largely in terms of spending and haven’t learned how to save or build assets in proportion to what they earn.


  • Being Broke vs Building Wealth:

Broke means, if you lose your primary source of income today, you will not be able to maintain the lifestyle you have become accustomed to because you have no assets to rely on. 

– We must dismiss this idea that we will always make more money. We have a finite amount of productive years to work; many people will never be as agile both mentally and physically as they are now.  

– Building wealth is more about how much you keep than how much you spend. 

– Broke people and rich people approach the same amount of money differently. They understand the relationship between how we earn and how we spend and they know where the balance is.

– Developing a wealthy mind-set requires the understanding of the concept that the way you spend, invest, and manage ten naira is the way you’ll spend, invest, and manage ten million. 

  • Active vs Passive Income:

– Active income is the income you get from services rendered, it is usually your income from your job or business.

– Passive income in simple terms is money that you make while you are sleeping.

Financial Freedom is when your passive income exceeds your expenses.

– Ideally, the goal is to get to a point where the assets you’ve accumulated can pay you enough of an income to pay for your lifestyle. 

  • Understanding Net-worth:

– Your net-worth is your assets minus your liabilities and it gives you a snapshot of where you stand financially.
If you don’t treat the money you earn with respect, it will leave you with no respect. 

– By separating your spendings into wants and needs, you limit your wants and prioritise your needs.

  • The Principle of borrowing and repaying debts:

– Debt can be a tool to attain financial success but how you use it matters. 

– Wealthy people use debt as a tool to leverage their investments and grow their cash flow, but poor people use debt to buy things that make rich people richer. 

– Only borrow to acquire an asset that will appreciate in value.

– Prioritize your debts. Decide which ones are most important. This depends on your particular situation—you could slay the largest debt first to give you more confidence that the rest are manageable, or you could decide it is best to start with the debt charged with the highest interest rate, so the debt does not increase. 

– Set deadlines for each loan. There should be an estimate of how long it is going to take you to pay off each debt.

– Think about the triggers that led you into debt in the first place and try to eliminate them. There’s no point getting out of debt only to dive back in.


  • On Savings, Investments and Budgeting: 

– We have to learn to spend with intention by allocating our resources to reflect the lifestyle we want and are able to sustainably afford. 

– A smart woman doesn’t wait for financial surprises; she systematically saves toward her emergency fund because she knows that this is the foundation of her financial journey. 

– Before you splurge make sure you have at least six to nine months of living expenses saved up for emergencies.

Calculate how much you would need to survive if you lost your job or income from your business. What do your living expenses add up to each month? Multiply that by six or nine months.

– Emergency fund are liquidity and safety, not return, so do not take risks with your Emergency fund to earn more or sacrifice liquidity.

– Money in the bank is equal to spending. It doesn’t matter whether you earn ten thousand or ten million naira a month.

– As regards investments, start with high savings accounts or money market accounts that preserve your capital and give you a reasonable return.

– Your investment goals should reflect your financial obligations, what you value most, and what you want the money you make to be able to do for your life in general.

– The cardinal rule when you invest is, don’t invest in anything you don’t understand.

– People associate the word “budget” with scarcity or a reduction in station of life. Therefore, “budget” is a word they come to resent. 

– The reality is, a budget is something that tells you how to allocate your resources and it should reflect what you value.

– The reason most people live paycheque to paycheque is because they don’t have a full understanding of what their income can support. 

  • On Making Profit, Solving problems and Fulfilling purpose:

– The most successful people are the ones who are able to articulate what they want for their lives. Success is deeply rooted in having a solid plan that is tailored to what you want.

– The more people you are able to reach and influence, the more likely you are to attract new business, gain access to partnerships or raise funding for your business.

–  To make profit your idea must either be generating more revenue for your company or reducing costs.

– Nine out of ten times when people ask how they can make more money the answer is find your purpose.

Your purpose is your calling; the thing that drives you to be successful because it is what you were created to do.

– Passion is that idea that burns deep inside you, so much so that you can’t stop thinking about it until you execute.

– Skill-set are things that you are good at, either because it’s what you’ve studied or something you’ve spent hours honing.

 – Your idea has to solve a problem people are willing to pay for.

– It is important for people to understand purpose because, they often pursue an idea and then can’t follow through on because they haven’t thought through these three questions:

1) Is it big enough (Impact)? 

2) Are you in a unique position to make it happen (Skills/Resources)? 

3) Are you passionate enough about it (Does it pass the sleepless night test)?

  • On Paid Jobs vs Entrepreneurship:

– In order to maximise your earning power and have the ability to invest, you need to pursue a career you are passionate about and create multiple streams of income. 

– This does not necessarily mean you have to become an entrepreneur. 

– The reality is, not everyone is cutout to be their own boss and you need to learn this early on. 

– With entrepreneurship growing in global popularity, everyone wants to be a boss. A good proportion of those already on the corporate ladder can’t wait to jump off and start a business so that they too can escape.

– You shouldn’t be thinking about a “me too” copy and paste approach because the idea of working for yourself sounds appealing. 

Being a boss is not all about working for yourself and avoiding the discipline of a nine-to-five. Becoming your own boss means you are responsible for an enterprise and beyond the idea—a successful enterprise has to have structure, a business model and a value proposition. 

If we all become our own bosses who is going to work for whom? Who will be the employees?

– Ideas are a dime a dozen; execution and the ability to solve a series of problems is the actual key to success.

– People who are entrepreneurial in their thinking are value-driven. They adopt critical thinking and embrace innovation and continuous improvement. 

– They are the ones you see solving problems every day and are getting paid to do so regardless of whether they are the founders of the company or not. 

– The thought process should be, what skills or resources do I have to execute that idea? Am I passionate enough about it to pursue it and follow through?

– Instead of over-glamorizing either end of the spectrum, let’s focus on encouraging people to be value-driven, solve problems where they are and focus on finding career paths that suit their skill-set and temperament so they can thrive.

||Conclusion

What makes us wealthy is not how much we earn but how we can systematically use a proportion of the income we earnto build assets that pay us over time.

The smart money woman would rather live like a princess forever than live like a queen for a few years. Ultimately, improving her net worth is more important than upgrading her wardrobe. This mind set helps her reason when she’s spending.


||Observations

I actually enjoyed the book being partly fiction although the characters seemed way out of my league as per their earnings. 

While this book made a fine read, the element of faith which is a priority for me, would have given a more balanced approach. 


||Recommendations

This is a practical book for every young woman who dreams of becoming financially established someday.


:::requ1ne:::

     ❤️❤️❤️

JULY 2019|| On Adulting, Being Single and Living in Nigeria.

Hey guys,

Welcome to JULY. 

Disclaimer: This post is a RANT and it may or may not make much sense. 

For a while now I’ve been ruminating on each of these three topics in no particular order. And the more I think about them, the more questions I have begging for answers. 

I hope you my dear readers will shed some insight with me as I share my thoughts below. 

Thank you in advance. 

||On Adulting: 

About two years ago while jobless and becoming increasingly frustrated as I searched for one, I wrote this post 

Tbh, I’m still yet to figure out this whole Adulting thing. 

In fact, the older I get the more complicated the concept seems to be. 

As a kid I thought becoming an adult meant having my own space, making my own money, and just doing my own thing, but nothing could be further from the truth than that.

It’s an irony that everyone knows what I’m supposed to be doing with my adult life except me. 

In other words, my business is practically everybody’s business from parents to close relatives, to colleagues at work, to the society at large. 

Everyday I’m faced with choices of what to do with my money, my time and even my energy.

“Eunice, you must get a side hustle o.” 

“Why do I need a side hustle?”

“Because you need an extra source of income.” 

“What if I’m not interested in having an extra source of income?”

“Do you know how hard it is to survive in this Economy with just your salary?”

For some reasons, I’ve still not been able to convince myself about the side-hustle thing, as most of the popular options (i.e. hands-on skills like baking, sewing etc) do not interest me. 

So in recent times my focus has been on saving at all costs, and my dilemma is always whether to spend or not to spend money.

Should I buy a new pair of shoes or save the money to buy gas?

Should I buy soup ingredients that will last a few days with this N2000 or just buy a KFC takeout for dinner instead?

Should I invest all this money in mutual funds or spend part of it in buying Asoebi for my friend’s wedding?

And if I’m to be completely honest, my common sense doesn’t always win in this regard. 

Again, why does Adulting have to be this hard?

***

||On being single: 

This is another shocking realization for me. Being single is not always as rosy as it is portrayed to be. 

Or maybe I’ve been trying too hard at being optimistic as a single lady. 

Of course the freedom to “do me” most times is something I don’t take for granted. 

Still, why does my heart do flip-flops each time I come across a couple doing PDA?

And why did no one warn me that seeing faces of cute babies whether online or in real life will make my ovaries scream in expectation?

What about instances when the innocent smile of a gentleman causes my heart to melt into whipped ice cream ? 

Countless times, I’ve had to remind myself that my body is the temple of the Holy Spirit and unwholesome thoughts cannot be entertained there. 

A number of times I even find myself reporting to a fellow believer, asking for prayers and encouragement because I can’t seem to concentrate with my raging hormones.

To be single is hard work, no wonder many people younger than me are running off to get married. 

And as for the married people that like to intimidate us with this annoying cliché “you’ll understand better when you’re married,” please what is your purpose in this life?

Why can’t we understand better now?

Do we have to earn marital wisdom through “trial and error?”

If I can’t wrap my head around taking care of just myself on some days, how do married couples manage to take care of themselves (their jobs, children, finance, inlaws, health etc) on a daily basis without going crazy?

What is the secret you people are not telling us?

And enough of trying to sugarcoat the truth, please tell us as it is. 

Let’s know if we’re truly mature enough to handle it. 

***

||On Living in Nigeria.

To live in any country can be challenging, but to live in a struggling third world country such as Nigeria is nothing short of exasperating.

Living in Nigeria demands a certain level of courage and doggedness that you don’t even know you have.

It’s only a few months to 2020 and we are no where near achieving the 24 hour/day electricity supply promised by our founding fathers. 

Shall we talk about the despicable state of many of our major roads? 

Or the constant nightmare of encountering highway marauders despite the numerous security checkpoints?

And while our political leaders and law enforcers are a far cry from the ideal, the average nigerian citizen is also as corrupt as they come.

We believe the only way to get even is by cheating a system that has woefully failed us. 

So we don’t mind being dubious about our tax returns.

We falsify academic results to get appointment letters and refuse to pay for electricity, water supply or waste disposal, if we can help it. 

Our attitude to work whether in the private or public sector is so nonchalant. 

The aim of the average Nigerian employee is to do as little as possible but get the highest benefit. 

An average Nigerian doesn’t mind shunting the queues whether in the banking hall, on the highway or in the supermarket.

How do we solve a problem like Nigeria? Where do we even begin from?

Should we all just leave and forget about this annoying country?

***

*PDA: Public Display Of Affection.

Cheers,

:::requ1ne:::

     ❤️❤️❤️