HouseJob Chronicles- A day in the life of a Naija Intern.

Hello friends, 

Here’s a post showing what a typical stress free day looks like for me as a medical house officer in Nigeria. 

Enjoy!

***

Today was a good one.

Let’s call it the typical FRIDAY SYNDROME


So I’ll join Millions of People across the globe to scream


T.G.I.F

Yaaas! (Image credit: WEB)

Although I have to be at the hospital tomorrow, work is going to be flexible (hopefully), since it’s a non-working day.


Tbh, I never imagined housejob could be this hard.

There are days I love my job 100%.

Other days, not so much.

Occasionally, I get lowkey depressed.

Talk about the physical and mental stress, whether sensible or otherwise.


HouseJob in Naija takes a special kind of grace I tell you.

Anyway, TODAY started on a relatively good note.

When I woke up- which was around 5:30 a.m- the power was out as usual, and with the intensity of Lokoja heat, I had no choice but to get out of bed asap.

I was able to take my bath, brush my teeth, journal some thoughts in my diary, and reheat yesterday’s dinner (white rice and stew) for lunch- all in record time!

LUNCH PACK…Issa Lifesaver!
My dad called while I got dressed, a few minutes after I stepped out of the house, got on the first motorbike I saw and was at the hospital before 7 a.m.

Of the 15 patients- that are split over 6 wards-being managed by my team (Endocrinology Unit), I saw 6 while my partner, Dr. M, (who is definitely more hardworking than I am) saw the remaining 9 patients.

Meet Dr. M

By 8 a.m, I joined other interns, residents and consultants, for our weekly departmental House Officer’s presentation.

Today’s topic was CNS Toxoplasmosis by one of my favorite colleagues, Dr. Tony. It lasted about 2 hours. 

I’m not proud to say I didn’t concentrate during the presentation, because I was chatting on one hand, and making a to-do-list/shopping list on the other. 

Following the presentation, my team had a pre-consultant ward round. 

The team is made up of 2 House officers (Interns), 2 residents, 1 senior resident, and 2 consultants.

Thankfully, the Consultant ward round didn’t hold, as the consultant who was to do the round got called for an important meeting. 

Still wardround lasted about 3 hours. We had to take blood samples, update treatment sheets, check drug charts and the likes. At some point, I had to sneak off to have lunch (because I can’t come and go and kill myself). 

The goodnews was that we discharged 3 of our patients, which is a MIRACLE.

We were done before 2 p.m. While the rest of my team left for home/to run personal errands, I stayed behind.

Not too long after, there was a call that one of our patients with DMFS was out of surgery and my team should start him on the Glucose-Potassium-Insulin (GKI) regimen. 
It took a while to get through to one of my senior colleagues and I even got into an altercation with an otherwise-usually friendly colleague, that got me both angry and hurt. I tried to make the person understand I was only joking but I guess it was a costly one.

Maybe, I play too much. #Lessonlearnt

Eventually left the hospital around 5 p.m. after setting an iv access and constituting the GKI regime together with my Partner.



Dr. M, walked me to the hospital gate, then I went across the road to a nearby supermarket for my typical weekly shopping. It was surprising when moments later two of my cousins (who were visiting a relative at the hospital) walked in too. Let’s just say I was wowed when all my groceries were paid for by one of them.

On leaving the supermarket, my favorite bike man picked me up (he charges only N50 instead of the usual N60 or even N70). The distance between the hospital and where I leave, is roughly 5 minutes by bike. 


When I got home, I briefly went to purchase a bag of pure water from a small shop on the street. 

After which I prepared indomie (with boiled egg) for dinner, had a bath, and ate as I chatted with friends PRN. 


I plan to take a nap shortly after publishing this post.

My plan for the rest of this evening is to: tidy up the kitchen, write in my prayer journal, probably practice Spanish on my Duolingo app, go through a presentation I have in 2 weeks and catch up on social media. 

So far, it’s been a good day and I really look forward to having a refreshing weekend even though I’m on call tomorrow. 😑

I know this feeling…hahaha (Photo-credit: WEB)
Again,

We don’t COMPLAIN, We give THANKS!

For life, for strength, for health, for joy unspeakable, for peace in the midst of several storms, for unmerited favor, for victory…for God’s uncountable blessings.

Thank God for housejob.

It’s a fulfillment of one of the scriptures God laid in my heart during my waiting season, last year:

And he has been faithful through it all.

***

Cheers to a fantastic weekend,
:::requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️

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6 thoughts on “HouseJob Chronicles- A day in the life of a Naija Intern.

    1. Hehe..I dread the post consultant rounds o.
      After spending 3-4 hours with them, we have to go back and carry out their outlined plans, sometimes spending another 2 hours or more.

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