Chronicles of a Student-Doctor #10

CHAPTER 10: OPHTHALMOLOGY POSTING.

The eye is the lamp of the body. If your eye is sound, your entire body will be full of light.” (Matthew 6:22 AMP)


Know your eye anatomy:


The gift of sight is one of the best gifts from the creator. It’s a beautiful thing to be able to behold the beauty in the world around us.

There are several preventable causes of blindness and visual impairment, so the need to take good care of your eyes cannot be over emphasized.

Welcome to the Ophthalmology Clinic.


Now Ophthalmology is one of the most fascinating fields of Medicine, but it takes only an insider to appreciate what really goes on in there.
The average person sees an eye doctor as the doctor that examines the eyes, and recommends eye glasses or contact lenses. But there is a lot more to what eye doctors actually do.

An Ophthalmologist
Let me quickly clarify these job descriptions:
a. Optician: A technician who is trained to design and fit lenses and frames for eye glasses, as well as contact lenses, as prescribed by an Optometrrist or Ophthalmologist. 
b. Optometrist: A healthcare professional (also known as a doctor of optometry), trained to perform eye exams and vision tests, prescribe and dispense corrective lenses, detect certain eye abnormalities and prescribe medications for certain eye diseases.
c. Ophthalmologist: A medical doctor who specializes in eye and vision care. An ophthalmologist is trained to diagnose and treat all eye diseases, perform eye surgery, and prescribe and fit eyeglasses and contact lenses to correct vision problems. Furthermore, some ophthalmologists decide to specialize in fields dealing with the Cornea, Retina, Glaucoma, Pediatric Ophthalmology, Neurophthalmology, or Plastic surgery.

(source: http://www.aapos.org)
 
To be honest, in my first week, a lot of the terminologies used in the clinic were pretty foreign to me. Thankfully I worked with an amazing Preceptor, Dr. Grant-Ledger, who was more than ready to put me through any question I had. In retrospect, the posting was one of my best.

The outpatient clinic ran like crazy from around 9:30 am upto 2 p.m. on some days. Then we had surgeries on Wednesdays. Unlike in most other surgical sub-specialties, we get to actually sit down during Ophthalmology procedures. 

(Photocredit: http://www.truevisionsys.com)

Thankfully, we had Fridays off.
I saw a good number of cases ranging from Blepharitis, Pterygium, Stye, Cataracts, Strabismus, Esotropia, Cellulitis, Glaucoma, Amblyopia, Conjunctivitis to Traumatic Eye injuries.

My Preceptor was super student-friendly and she allowed us to clerk patients and perform their eye exam/vision tests. It was a memorable experience in all.

SNELLEN CHART
SLIT-LAMP EXAM

Maybe it’s time to visit your eye-doctor ๐Ÿ˜…๐Ÿ˜„

(Photocredit: WEB)

I’ve frequented eye clinics more than any other clinic for the past decade, because of the myopic condition of my eyes (I wear prescription glasses). 


So there’s a big maybe as to whether I’ll like to consider Ophthalmology as a specialty. And I personally admire female Ophthalmologists. They are usually nice and easy to relate with. Aside from the nitty-gritty details of microsurgery and the long hours in the Operating Theatre, I think Ophthalmology is a field I wouldn’t mind exploring.

Ophthalmology clinic selfie…

Shoutout to all Ophthalmologists out there, thank you for the beautiful job you do. 

Cheers!

Thank you for reading,

:::requ1ne:::

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