50 Practical Ways To Stay Motivated In Medical School (Part 4)

You can read the previous part here

31. Play Stimulating Games

It’s amazing how overcoming small challenges, even virtual ones, can motivate us to face real life situations. 
In a particular semester in medical school, I became almost addicted to “Candy Crush” and jokingly told myself that if I could beat a certain level in the game, no subject was too difficult for me to handle. Amazingly, I went on to have some of my best results that semester. 
Thankfully, there are a variety of medical games that not only help students to unwind, but also improve medical knowledge remarkably. 

Recommended:
ClinicalSense
Prognosis

It’s also possible for you and your friends, to make up random games on the go, for instance, naming medical conditions that start with letter A or try to play Scrabble with the medical dictionary as a guide or have an Anatomy Challenge, where you only speak in anatomically terms for a whole day. I can bet it’ll be fun.

32. Stay Focused

No matter what happens around you, don’t lose your primary focus for being in medical school- LEARNING! 

It is easy to get distracted by other things, social media for instance, but most of these distractions are avoidable. 

The rule of thumb is, if something can wait, let it wait. It takes a lot of discipline to achieve that, but soon it becomes a habit.

Distractions are like leaking holes in a pipe, too many of them will jeopardize your journey in the long run; so you must be wary. 

It’s important to remind yourself each day about your Priorities/Goals and a good way to achieve that is to create a personalized Vision Board.





Recommended
: Making Vision Boards Work For You  (Terri Savelle Foy)

Also Read: How to avoid distractions in College

33. Ask questions:
Nothing is more powerful as a tool of for learning, than asking questions.”- Myles Munroe.

Asking questions, especially from those who have gone ahead, provides you with more opportunities to learn even outside the classroom. The wells of experience from senior colleagues will not only equip you with the courage to face some of your worst fears but also the wisdom to avoid some costly mistakes.

There are enough answers if only you ask the right questions – REQUINE.

So quit trying to figure out everything on your own. Just ask away!

34. Aim for excellent grades:

While getting good grades isn’t all there is to medical school, it certainly helps to boost your morale when you find out that you got an A in the Genetics exam, or your name was on the dean’s list four semesters in a row with a scholarship to complete your studies. 

Getting an AWARD for your hardwork definitely motivates you to do more! 

35. Enjoy the Learning process:

Remember how eager you were to know the alphabets and engage in other learning activities as a pre-school toddler?

Like most kids that age, learning was fun. Unfortunately, many students lose that excitement as they get older. If all you think of is how to graduate from medical school, you won’t get the best out of it. 

To have a fulfilling career, you need to cultivate the habit of enjoying the learning process. Doctors are life-long learners! 

Be an active learner by applying something you’re taught in your interactions/activities each day. Let your knowledge be an investment into the future, generations will thank you for it. 

Also Read: 7 Strategies For Studying In Medical School

36. Think Medicine, Think Prestige: 

We all know that Medicine as a career, is both prestigious and lucrative. Here’s what one medical doctor says, “The associated prestige from non-medics was pretty cool that I didn’t wanna lose that.” 

Perhaps among your childhood friends/immediate family, you’re the first to get into med school. Think of all those looking upto you and how much value you will add to the society.  

37. Believe you can make a difference:

Have you ever asked yourself if you can make any real difference in the field of Medicine? The truth is, you can. 

Think of the hundreds/thousands of patients (and their relatives) that’ll come your way in the course of your career, and if you’re more inclined to research, imagine the groundbreaking discoveries you can make in Medicine. Also think of how you can inspire the next generation positively whether in the classroom or on the ward. 

38. Financial Sacrifices And Future Renumeration: 

Think of medical school as an investment. Most people put in lots of money whether through student loans, scholarships, personal savings or family support into financing their medical education. In most countries, medical education is more expensive than the average college degree, so you don’t want all the money spent to be a waste. The good thing though is that you are likely going to be overcompensated for every penny you put in. 

39. Don’t Quit:

Dropping out of medical school, means you’re going to start all over, whatever else you choose to do.” says one Doctor.  While quitting isn’t always a negative thing to do, the thought of losing all the time/energy you put into medical school can be really frustrating. So why not take the bull by the horns and keep at it?

40. Take it one step at a time:
One of my top secrets of passing through medical school with minimal emotional breakdown was learning to take each moment/challenge one step after the other. Before I knew it I was counting the Months/Weeks/Days to my finals. There were lots of giants to slay along the way, tests, exams and more, but knowing that one step in the right direction will take me closer to my goal, I was motivated me to keep moving. In the end, the journey was so worth it!

More tips to stay motivated through med school? Please share.

Cheers!

:::requ1ne:::

A W E S O M E || AUGUST

 

I’m so excited to be writing this POST. There’s so much to say that I’m afraid of just blabbing…and well, it’s a long read, so grab a seat if you can.
The 13th of July was the Induction Ceremony for FTDs by the Medical And Dental Council Of Nigeria (MDCN).
So officially, yours sincerely is now a bonafide, licensed, certified and registered Doctor (even though the license is “provisional” pending the completion of my internship, yada, yada…🙄)


The event took place in Abuja (the capital of Nigeria) and it was all shades of lovely. The highlights were the induction lecture by the Guest Lecturer, Prof. Lovett Lawson, and the keynote address by the Honorable Minister of Health, Prof Isaac Adewole, who was the Special guest of Honor.
Afterwards we took the Hippocratic Oath, received our provisional licenses and were served with refreshments.
And to add to the spice of the event, my entire family were present and that doubled as a family getaway (i.e. a mini-vacay), the first we’ve had in years…and oh, it was refreshing!

#Family
#FamilyDinner

 

I remember this time about 5-6 years ago, when getting into medical school was my “biggest” prayer point…I was so obsessed about it, that I fantasized and day-dreamed of it till it became a reality, and now I can boldly say that every tear, every disappointment, every joy, every victory….everything about that journey was worth it!

God MAKES dreams come true! (Psalm 37:5)

So moving on, I’ve tagged this month-

A W E S O M E ||A U G U S T
And according to Dictionary.com the word AWESOME implies:

inspiring an overwhelming feeling of reverence, admiration or fear.

And I just can’t shake off the feeling that it’s exactly what I’m to expect this season. I believe God is going to do something  amazing that will leave me in awe of him.

That said, Let’s roll!

  • WORSHIP SONG

More of you (SINACH)

  • SCRIPTURE FOR THE SEASON

Matthew 7:7-8 AMP

“Ask and keep on asking and it will be given to you; seek and keep on seeking and you will find; knock and keep on knocking and the door will be opened to you. For everyone who keeps on asking receives, and he who keeps on seeking finds, and to him who keeps on knocking, it will be opened.”

  • Reading

1. FERVENT (Priscilla Shirer):

I’m re-reading this for my Small Group Bible Study and I’ve been blessed all over again.

“We simply don’t have the luxury of playing nice with prayer, not if we want things to change. If all we’re doing is flinging words and emotions in all directions without any real consideration for the specific ways the enemy is targeting us and the promises of the God that apply to us, we’re mostly just wasting our time.”

2. UNSTOPPABLE (Christine Caine)

“Our response should be to reach for Jesus in our moments of trials and allow his strength to make us into Champions. Champions understand that God uses every trial and obstacle as spiritual workout to build our strength and endurance.”

3. THE 7 HABITS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PEOPLE (Stephen Covey)

“We see the world not as it is, but as we have been conditioned to see it. The way we see things is the source of the way we think or act.”

4. OUT OF CONTROL AND LOVING IT (Lisa Bevere)

“God isn’t interested in using us, he wants to transform and conform us to his image. It grieves him when we allow him only limited access into our lives, the areas we hold back from God eventually become our downfall.”

5. INNOVATION AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP (Peter F. Drucker)

“A new business must start with the assumption that its product/service may find customers in markets no one thought of. Rather than dismiss the unexpected as an exception, entrepreneurs need to look at them carefully as distinct opportunities.”

6. THE BIBLE: The book of JEREMIAH


  • Still Learning

Spanish language (Duolingo and Memrise)
According to Duolingo, I’m now about 4% proficient in Spanish language (7 months and counting since I started learning actively).

Estoy Contento!!!

Memrise has been kind enough to give me a breakdown of the words I learn weekly

Igbo language
Learning the Igbo language hasn’t been as easy as I thought, coupled with the lack of consistency on my part (there are days I even forget I’m supposed to be learning it…smh😅). I’ve tried video tutorials and Igbo language apps, and they’ve not been as effective as I wanted.
My dear Igbo kindreds in the house, what are your suggestions for a non-native speaker to learn your language, biko (short of hiring a tutor)?

  • Recently Completed

StoryTeller By Design (An Online Writing Course)
So I took another creative writing course recently and learnt more about the importance of my tone, style, clarity and authenticity in writing, the best part was the commitment I had to make at the end of the course:

  • Summer Activities

Summer so far has been pleasant. Thank God for the experiences each new season brings. So lately here are the things I’ve been doing:

Home tutoring
Throughout summer, I’ll be tutoring an elementary pupil who has a really poor grasp of English and academically behind for his age. Despite these challenges I believe I’ve been graced for this phase of the journey, and there will be remarkable improvement at the end of summer.

Ankara crafts and designs
Finally, I get to do something I’ve been looking forward to, and is actually fun plus keeps me occupied for the time being. There’s hardly any limit to what can be decorated with an Ankara fabric. Here are a few of my crafts with the skill I’ve acquired:

Notebook, Phone pouch and Bracelet

Studying:
I’ve been going through selected topics in General Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics and then reviewing my History Taking and Physical Exam skills.

Job Hunt:


The story of my life!!

  • Currently Loving

FoodNetwork : So I have a new favorite channel (sorry Disney and Nickelodeon 🙋), and it’s the FoodNetwork. Their shows give so much inspiration to the creative mind. I especially enjoy how they make the art of cooking look so appealing rather than a mere chore. And thanks to them, “my kitchen” (well my mum’s) has been quite busy in recent times.

 

Making Pizza from scratch with my homeys for the first time, a few days back, was one of my best moments this year. Not only was it a memorable experience working in the kitchen as a team (which is rare), the Pizza tasted so nice that we had second and third helpings.

  • Random Everything

1. Highlights from my Journal of Goodness: The habit of journaling is such an eye opener. I was amazed by the little things I chronicled on a daily basis for a whole month that I’d otherwise have taken for granted. Things like:

– receiving cash gifts (made close to 5K last month from “dash” alone)
– visits from friends and other acts of hospitality,
– random calls and texts that made my day,
– hanging out with family (whether praying, gisting or making dinner)
– unexpected kind and encouraging words,
– feedback (likes, comments) and even new subscribers on the blog!!!

With that experience I hope to cultivate the habit of appreciating the little things people do for me and also cultivate active ways to “pay it forward”!

2. Home Theft Incidence (and a few tips to prevent window-robbery):
So a couple of days back, someone (or more) stole from our house via a window in the bedroom I sleep in (with two others at that time), and made away with some electronic devices, cash etc
It was especially painful for me, because I was up at night to do a couple of things, and on getting back to bed, I heard some sounds (and assumed it was our dog patrolling the compound) and also saw a flash light across the dresser (and assumed someone left a device there that was blinking). If only I’d gotten up to check…

Long story short, it wasn’t until the next morning when I saw my bag on the floor and the window wide open that I began to connect the dots and raised an alarm. It was a rather sad incident for all of us that day and I’d be lying if I say I’ve not been a little paranoid since. Sleeping at night in recent times has been quite challenging as I’m still trying to adjust to NOT getting up to check every weird sound I hear😱
One night in particular, I was so distressed at the thought of another theft that I could barely close my eyes for HOURS, so I literally prayed myself to sleep. Thank God for the comfort of the scriptures- Proverbs 3:24 (GNB):


It’s still my prayer that somehow the thieves would get caught and be brought to justice or the Holyspirit himself would arrest them, cause them to repent and make a restitution. Either way, we WIN! 💃💃💃
For my Nigerian audience (living in Nigeria), these tips might be of help:
1- DO NOT leave your electronic gadgets charging close to a window (except you live in an upstairs apartment)
2- ALWAYS have a flash light nearby when you sleep (that way you can quickly investigate if you notice anything odd)
3- KEEP all money (or better still your handbags/purses/wallets) and other valuables safely tucked away in a locked closet or random non-conspicuous place (eg under the bed, inside a bucket etc 😉)
4- Items like mopping sticks, rakes and other sharps are enablers for these predators and if possible should NOT be left lying about in the compound.

3. My New Muse:
I recently started crushing on this game PhatGal and though I’m yet to get a good hang of it, I can say it’s an interesting one. So check it out on GooglePlay store.


4. 8 Casual, Weird or Not-So-Weird, Things About Me:

(1. I’ve traveled via the 4 major means of transportation ✈️🚉⛴🚗 . Flying is the best! 

(2. Brushing my teeth every night is one of my most favorite things to do 👄

(3. I’m the girl who enjoys eating other people’s food (especially my mum’s) just because… 🍲

(4. I don’t know how to/ have never played chess before in my life and I’m not bothered 💆

(5. If wishes were horses, I’ll eat fried plantain every day and with every meal (or not) 🍛

(6. I sometimes sing/talk to myself while walking down the street and it’s never boring 💁

(7. I’m a confirmed bathroom “worshipper” and “dancer”, don’t judge  👯

(8. Between Watching a Movie or Reading a Novel of the same plot? Well you know the answer already…

5. Inspirations From Around The Web:

1. Pregnancy Lessons Lisa Bevere Taught Me

2. When God Doesn’t Answer Your Prayer

3. How To Stay Motivated To Keep Blogging

4. Respecting God’s boundaries

5. Make Vision Boards Work For You

6. For Your Husband

  • Special Announcement

We sell books @Erema Bookstore


Address: Shop B17, King’s Shopping Mall, opposite Airport junction, Alakia, Ibadan.

Contact: +17844913013 (Whatsapp Only) 

**Delivery is FREE in Ibadan.

Have an AWESOME August, y’all!
:::requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️

MEMOIRS OF A MUSHIN GIRL.

PS: This post was inspired by Nedoux’s I LIVE HERE.

Photo credit: WEB

Disclaimer: I no be Lagos pikin o (i.e. I was neither “born” nor “bred” there). Infact I’ve never really been a fan of Lagos, and I don’t think I’m ready to change my mind yet😁. So y’all should take my observations/conclusions with a pinch of salt (and pepper😜). Tenkiu!


Story-behind-the-Story:
Like some of you know, yours sincerely was a short-term guest (and tourist) in the famous city of Lagos for about 3 months, because of the MDCN remedial program for FTDs which took place at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH). While my stay wasn’t an entirely rosy one, it sure had its perks.
Since LUTH provided limited accommodation for those who registered for the program, I had to make alternative arrangement. For the first few weeks, I stayed with my cousin’s family in Ebutte-Meta, but the commute (especially after closing hours) took its toll on me. So I was all determined to find a place to rent around LUTH (i.e. Surulere-Idiaraba-Mushin axis) which proved even more challenging than I expected.

House hunting
anywhere is not an easy task, but unlike my SVG experience, the Naija house agents I came across were quite “mouthed” (i.e. smooth talkers with little integrity, unfortunately).
I didn’t even know there was such a thing as viewing fee- where you paid the agent a certain amount just for showing you an apartment (whether you want to rent the place or not. Like seriously?!). One guy requested for a whole 5K as viewing fee and I was like, “Mba, I think I’ll pass.” 

I had to make calls upon calls, visited a couple of places (including stuffy wannabe guest houses, *rolls eyes*) before finding an apartment (thanks to a contact from an old friend), that was remotely affordable and suitable for the purpose of my stay. Thus began my sojourn in the neighborhood called M-U-S-H-I-N

And looking back, I have no regrets (except that I didn’t really get to explore other areas in Lagos, because “no time” and “no money”).

***

Living in Mushin.

Mushin
, a closely-knit community, largely known for its history of violence ranging from local gang clashes to political uproars, is one of the few neighborhoods in Lagos, that the average (educated, upper middle-class) Lagosian, wouldn’t consider living in (as a first choice, anyway).
When compared to its immediate neighbors like Surulere and Yaba, Mushin is but a REFINED (or should I say, GLORIFIED) slum. One of the things I admire about the community though, is that the streets if narrow, are relatively well-planned and the roads are fairly accessible.
A friend of mine who has lived in Lagos for a while, expressed his concerns about my safety in that neighborhood. Thankfully, throughout my stay I did not have an unfortunate experience.

Mushin is quite densely populated, with buildings literally filling up every inch of land in the community. My street, Kosobameji (which is a 3-minute walking distance by the way), apart from the residential buildings, had at least 5 Churches, 2 Mosques, 4 Schools and 10 Shops; and is just a mere fraction of the Mushin Community. Other streets were interconnected to ours in such a way, that there were multiple routes to get to the Main Street (LUTH road), which eventually joined the dual-carriage Mushin main road.
My roommate and I shared a storey building (that sits on about half a plot) with 5 other families. That’s the smallest compound I’ve ever lived in. Thankfully, we had a cordial relationship with our neighbors, most of the time. We simply had to contribute to paying for the prepaid card for electricity, as well as the waste disposal fee, and took turns washing the gutter. 
Mushin is everything from hilarious to sometimes utterly ridiculous. There were days I enjoyed the bustling LIFE, and other days I wondered how I found myself in such a place in the first place.

Highlights of my stay in MUSHIN:

LAGOS, Nigeria.

Call-To-Prayer:
The early morning call-to-prayer by Muslim clerics that unfailingly usher you into the day (doesn’t help that there are multiple mosques in the area), plus the subsequent calls till late evening. The good thing though, was that I learnt the specific times Muslims pray every day (5 a.m, 6 a.m, 1 p.m,  4 p.m, 7 p.m, and 8 p.m) and tried to adjust accordingly.

Street Football:

Photo credit: WEB

Sunday afternoon in Mushin, is a time for anyone and everyone to participate in a local game of football whether as players, fans or mere observers. The annoying thing though, is that the entire street is converted into a playing field; so pedestrians and motorists have to maneuver their way through, to avoid getting hit.

Owambe:


Owambe
(a slang for Partying) in Mushin, is on a different level. It basically consists of late evening drinking, dining and dancing, that extends from the host’s compound to the front of his neighbor’s compound (for lack of space), often rendering the street inaccessible to motorists and passers by. And I don’t think anyone needs to obtain their neighbors’ permission before doing such.
I recall how surprised I was the first time, when I met people partying right in front of our gate, only to discover that the celebrant wasn’t even from the compound.

Photo credit: WEB

Street Food:
On moving to Mushin, fried yam/sweet potatoes, fried plantain and akara, became my favorite things to snack on, because there were food stalls on every street corner. It’s perhaps the only thing I really miss about Mushin.

Photo credit: WEB

 

Street food in Naija is a MUST for any foreigner to experience. 

Water Vendors/Borehole Madam:

Photo credit: WEB
On days when there was no electricity to pump water into the house, we hired Water Vendors (locally called Abokis) to supply us with water and although the unit cost was cheap (N25 per fetch), it quickly added up to about N1000 at the end of a week, which was expensive.
A number of times, I had to go to the neighborhood borehole (less than 2-minute walking distance from my apartment) to buy water from this thick, black, never-smiling Madam (whose name I didn’t know). I was always intrigued by the number of people, both young and old, who were her daily customers and wondered how much sales she actually made every day.

“Akape” Story:
This is still the funniest experience as regards my stay in Mushin. One early morning (around past six), I had to go in search of painkillers, so an Okada guy took me to an open drugstore, where I found one sleepy Baba seated.
After telling him what I wanted, he offered me a clear plastic bag containing about 10 tablets, of different colors, shapes and sizes; popularly called “Akape” by the locals. This was from someone with little or no medical knowledge about the drug interactions of what he had prescribed.
When I asked what the pills were for, he said they could work for all kinds of pain (and in my mind I was like 😱😱😱). I quickly asked for known drugs like Diclofenac and Ibuprofen. Thankfully he had the former, so I double-checked its expiring date, paid for it and left. My mistake according to another Doctor-friend, was not buying the “Akape” for a proper analysis of the drug mix. I’ve heard that some local chemists would sometimes prescribe everything from anti-hypertensive meds to anti-thyroid meds for simple cases of Malaria.

Lights out:
Perhaps the most challenging issue with my stay in Mushin was the initial absence of electricity in the neighborhood, when my friend and I moved in. For a whole week, the light barely blinked and there were nights I cried myself to sleep.
Most nights we had to keep the window and door to our apartment wide-open to allow for proper ventilation, and there were nights we actually slept off…like that! Thankfully, we did not experience any incidence of theft.

Mosquitos, Rats and Cockroaches
were our regular companions in the apartment. The first two I could tolerate, the last I absolutely detested. Cockroaches are just plain irritating…ugh!

Kids at Play:
One of the families living in my compound had four kids, all boys! And these lads loved to play (sing and shout) all day, everyday, sometimes right up to our window/doorstep. A number of times, I actually had to step out of the apartment to reprimand them because I was either trying to sleep or to study. It took an extra caution on my part not to actually SPANK one of the kids, which would have been terrible because my hands ain’t exactly “Child-Friendly.” 😂😂😂

***

If you enjoyed reading this, you might also enjoy THIS IS LAGOS!

:::requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️

*FTDs- Foreign Trained Doctors.

I RELEASE YOU!

Credit: BoldSky.com
From the prison of my heart
And clutches of my thoughts,

I release you..

From what should have been
And what cannot be,

I release you..

From my unmet needs
And endless expectations,

I release you..

From my deepest longings
And saddest sighs,

I release you..

From what you don’t see, what you don’t hear
And what you don’t know,

I release you..

I know you don’t want to be here,
you’re free to fly as a bird,

I release you.

(Requine2015, “Therapeutic Tears“)

50 Practical Ways To Stay Motivated In Medical School (Part 3)

You can read the previous parts here and here.

21. Don’t lose your Passion: Passion is more than a feeling, it is a series of decisions that drive you towards your goal. When you’re passionate about something, you just don’t do it because you have to, you do it because you WANT to.


Not everyone has the bravery or opportunity to embrace their passion; in order to survive, most people prefer to be practical rather than passionate. (Singyin Lee). The difference however is always clear between a passionate doctor and an ordinary one.

Read more on10 Things You Should Know About Passion (And How To Find Yours)

22. Set Priorities and Rewards: 
“This is a very practical one for me, I set priorities for school work during the semester, and plan ahead for the holidays. I try to focus and do well during school and tell myself I’ve got the whole vacation as a reward for my hard work.” says Tinu, a medical student.

24. Faith in God: 

The place of faith in the medical school journey cannot be overemphasized. Like all of life’s challenges it is accompanied by risks and fears, but when you see medicine as more than a career path but a call to God’s purpose, you have the confidence that no matter what, the outcome will be victorious.

With God, ALL things (including your dream of becoming a medical doctor) are possible!*

25. Set simple goals and achieve them:
Setting goals no matter how simple they are, sets you apart as an individual. It will show in your commitment, perseverance and diligence towards a given cause. For starters, it can be as simple as- getting a better grade in the next Anatomy exam.

26. Be your greatest cheerleader: 

Everyday, get up and look into the mirror. Tell yourself where you see yourself in a few years. Encourage yourself when there’s no one else to turn to. Celebrate small victories. A pat on your shoulders, a reassuring smile and a toast after a good exam, all add up eventually.



27. Learn to unwind:

Over the years, medical students across the globe have learnt healthy ways to cope with the challenges of medical school. Sports, Entertainment and Religious activities are a few. The key is to discover the things that give you joy and do them.

Read: 5 tips to reduce stress in medical school 

28. Volunteer to teach others: 

As medical students, it’s important not just to learn but also to teach others what has been learnt. That way, you are not only helping others to know what they don’t know, you are also helping yourself to remember what you already know.

A good way to do this, is to join a tutorial group where you can offer to teach your junior colleagues (or even classmates) a subject you’re pretty good at.

29. Seek help when you need it:

It’s normal to feel overwhelmed at some point despite your best efforts at staying motivated. Times like that require that you seek help, whether from your academic adviser, professional counselor or a spiritual mentor, depending on your need(s). There are also countless self-help materials out there that you may find useful.

30. You’re not alone:

Think of all your senior colleagues and even lecturers who have been up that road and how they scaled through. The truth is, most of them probably had times of self doubts and frustrating grades too. So let their success stories inspire you.

Cheers,

:::requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️

*Matthew 19:26 (Paraphrased)

HELLO JULY!!!

Hola!


Welcome to JULY.

What’s the rush though?

2017 is going really FAST *sniffs*

And for some reasons I have started to feel like I’m actually older than I really am. 😒😟

Maybe my staying mostly indoors has something to do with it, because thanks to MDCN, yours sincerely has been living a pretty domesticated life lately.
Like I’m almost always home all day, everyday, and I have actually started reading articles for stay-at-home mums (just because), only that I’m neither married nor with kids yet. Sigh.
So my domestic roles cut across being a personal trainer to my parents (in our amateur morning stretching exercises 😂😂😂), 

#FitFam Squad

to helping to plan and prepare Family Meals (because I love Food Time Tables),

and also playing the House Doctor, especially prescribing antimalarial drugs (because if it looks like and feels like Malaria, it’s likely Malaria, right? I know WHO now recommends testing before treating Malaria, but with the ceaseless rainfall and relentless mosquitoes at home, there’s no time to waste time).


Just so you know, in the last week of June, I was also a victim to what I suspected to be Malaria and it rendered me almost useless to myself and those around me. I stayed in bed for days and even suffered a bout of depression (not clinically ofcourse). It was while recuperating that I wrote this poem LIFE 101.

Sickness of any type is especially frustrating for me because not only is it distressing, I also find it depressing and distracting. Bottomline is I don’t like to be sick, because it puts me out of CONTROL. Medical doctor or not, Sickness is Terrible!
Anyway, I’m so thankful I’m back on my two feet without having to go into the Emergency room. Hallelujah!

Now let’s roll into the JULY VIBES!

1. Song on replay:

Love me too much (Travis Greene)

2. Scripture for the month:

Habakkuk 2:2-3

Picture Perfect Scripture!

This is a much needed WORD for my season of wait! 

3. Currently reading:

The four loves (C.S Lewis)

“Friendship can be a school of virtue but also a school of vice. It makes good men better and bad men worse.”

Lioness Arising (Lisa Bevere)

“If God has spoken, believe him. Go where he asks you to go; listen to what he says to you. Follow this lion as he leads, and trust the “knowing” even when others might not understand.”

Unstoppable (Christine Caine)

“Faith is always one generation from extinction and we are the ones entrusted with carrying the baton for this generation and handing it off to the next.”

Innovation & Entrepreneurship (Peter F Drucker)
“Innovators should not be rewarded for failure but certainly not to be penalized for trying. An innovation is expected to start small but end big.”

Passing It On (Myles Munroe)
“Mentoring has more to do with association than with instruction.”

The Bible: The book of 2 Kings

Elisha!!! Powerful in death as in life!
– 

– The 30-31-30 Devotional by Eziaha.
In one word, the devotional is DEEP! You need to read it to understand what I’m saying. God bless Coach E as always! Pls download the FAB E Reader App here and look up the devotional too, even if it’s the free version.
4. Still learning:
Spanish and Igbo languages.

5. Just completed:

An 8-week StoryCrafting Course Online, and I’m so glad I participated.

Among other things the course has helped me to pay a closer attention not only to what I write, but also how I write. Another class is coming up soon, so if you’re interested you can check out this link.

6. Recent Adventure:

So I bashed my Dad’s car while driving into our compound one sunny afternoon 😂😂😂
insert *Tony Tetuila’s You don hit my car*

Thank God nothing was broken and no one was injured!
My parents were kind enough to laugh it off, and everyone began to recount their bashing experiences too…lol

7. New Muse

I started keeping a Goodness Journal from the first of July. 


This beautiful journal is a gift from my mum and I love how colorful it looks.
So basically it’s like A Book Of Remembrance for every good deed done (or kind word spoken) to me each day, whether by a loved one or a total stranger. The idea is to be able to reflect on these, when things get a little bit tough and also to keep my benefactors in prayers. So for every good thing you do to me this month, I get to treasure it foreverSo what are you waiting for?😜😅

8. Inspiration from around the web:

i. Me, Myself and Lies 

ii. Stop Confusing Physical Attraction with Chemistry

iii. The Ministry of home-making 

iv. Eggshells

PS: You can now follow me on Instagram @eunice_smiles.

Thank you for reading, 

And have a Fabulous July!
:::requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️

THE BUCKET-LIST OF AN AVERAGE NIGERIAN: Six Simple Wishes!

image

 

For the average Nigerian living in Nigeria, whether male or female, the good life is pretty much basic:

1. Settle down on time (aka get married between your mid 20s and early 30s, beyond that you’re a latecomer. In Nigeria, if you’ve not married, you’ve not arrived).

2. Find a good source of income (a white collar job or a thriving business venture or better still both, and earn above 100K in a month, at least).

3. Give your kids the best education you can afford (Primary, Secondary and Tertiary; all private schools if you can, because ASUU is a monster).

4. Build your own house(s) and buy your own car(s), whichever comes first. (It doesn’t matter if you fail to plaster the walls before you move into the house or your first car is a used 1980 Toyota model; As long as you’re a landlord and car owner, you’re successful).

5. Don’t die prematurely. There are a lot of unique but avoidable ways to die as an average Nigerian- RTAs, Armed Robbery Attacks, Fire Outbreaks and Medical Negligence, are just a few. (Nigerians love to live, no matter how bleak the future looks, after all a living dog is a better than a dead lion, na bible talk am. Ecclesiastes 9:4).

6. Retire to eat the fruits of your labor (i.e. your children get to graduate, start working, marry into wealth, make beautiful grandchildren, then relocate abroad where you can visit them as often as you want, after all they are your major investments!).

Maybe there are some individual twists to what I’ve mentioned based on personal interests, but no average Nigerian can deny relating to at least one of the above.

E go better” is the mantra of the Average Nigerian.
-It’s the reason we hustle (a refined name for struggling), from dawn to dusk just to make ends meet.
-It’s what we hope for every day of our lives, gathering in religious houses from week to week, holding special programs and giving special offerings, just to be blessed by the Almighty.
-It’s why we are restless and dissatisfied when others seem to be making better progress than we are.
In Nigeria, we thrive on sweat rather than sense, we own more buildings than we build people.

We are by nature myopic, more concerned about how we can get more rather than give more. Who wants to invest in a sick nation like Nigeria? The public civil servant just wants to collect his monthly salary and go home. There are bills to be paid, from DSTV monthly subscription to the Children’s school fees for the term.
The average Nigerian is less concerned about making any difference, whether local or global. Not the classroom teacher who just wants the day to end, not the nurse in the hospital ward already frustrated from the overwhelming workload and definitely not the police officer collecting bribes at the security checkpoint.

It is why many of our leaders lie and steal and get away with it. After all they are only sharing the national cake, which belongs to everybody but nobody in particular. And who wants to catch them? EFCC? Pls try again.

We the followers are not much different, as long as we can afford to fence our own compounds and provide for our basic amenities like electricity and water, the rest of the nation can go to rot.

So back to the bucket-list, what can we do to change our priorities from that of merely surviving to actually flourishing as Nigerians living in Nigeria? How can we make a paradigm shift from our attitude of consumption to that of contribution? Where do we even begin from?
My mum once mentioned this phrase while praying for my siblings and I recently, “They didn’t choose to be Nigerians…”
Neither did you. But now that you’re here, why not make your impact felt?
I’m Nigerian and Blessed.
:::requ1ne:::
❤️❤️❤️
*ASUU: Academic Staff Union of Universities

*EFCC: Economic and Financial Crime Commission

LIFE 101



My days are blue
And full of gloom
I have no clue
On what to do

I hide my tears
And wipe my eyes
There’s no one here
Who has to know

My nights are dark
No need to lie
The only choice
Is to sigh and cry

I paint my face
And fake a smile
I make ev’ryone
To think I’m fine

You can’t be mad
That I make you sad
And don’t feel bad
That I’m not alright

My days are blue
And full of gloom
I have no clue
On what to do…

(Requine 2017)
❤️❤️❤️

50 Practical Ways To Stay Motivated In Medical School (Part 2)

You can read the first part here.

11. Find a mentor.

“Mentorship is about getting to know someone and learning how he or she finds passion in his or her medical career.” writes Marissa Camilon, MD. “As young learners, we are drawn intrinsically to passionate people; whether their energy is shown through lectures, clinical work or even in simple conversations.”

Not only do mentors give advice, provide encouragement, offer insight, and connect you to a wider network; they can actually provide you with the perspective needed to figure out some solutions on your own.

Read more on: The importance of having mentors in medicine.

12. Medical school is just a phase. It won’t last forever. 

Just think of all the hurdles you’ve crossed to get to this stage, the endless tests and exams you had to take before you ever qualified to become a medical student. So is the journey through medical school, it is but a fraction of what lies ahead in your medical career. Stay optimistic!

13. Quitting is not an option. 

“I’m fully aware of how rigorous medical school is, that prepares me to face any challenge during the course of study.” says Adarju, a medical student, who is also a spoken word artiste and a public speaker. Like the famous expression, “When the going gets tough, the tough get going.”

14. Cultivate healthy friendships.

Keeping the right company in medical school not only improves your emotional wellbeing, it also strengthens your focus. Seek like-minded friends who have a similar passion for the journey. They will not only ask to hang out with you for pizza, they will also suggest sleepovers where you can study together for your next Pathology test.

15. Find what works for you and make it work.

“I studied myself, I’m a lecture kind-of-person, I learn more in class than when studying by myself. So I attended more lectures and studied minimally.” says Dr. Popoola.

16. Remember why you started.

For some it was the admiration for the likes of famous Neurosurgeon, Dr. Ben Carson, while for others it was simply a deep-seated desire to make a significant difference in their community. Whatever your motive was for applying to medical school, don’t allow the pressure from the workload to kill your dream.


Read Ben Carson’s story here.

17. Expectations from Friends and Family.

When you have a great relationship with those who believe in your dreams and want you to excel, not only does their flow of support (whether through uplifting words, cash or gifts) boost your morale; you also do not want to let them down, which motivates you to even go the extra mile. Your support network can be your greatest cheerleaders while in medical school, and also for a lifetime. “There’s no one in this world who believed in me like my mum did, even when I didn’t believe in myself or my performance in tests or exams. She was just exceptional.” says Dr. Tamie.

18. Eat healthy. 

It’s no news that a lot of medical students barely have enough time to grab a cup of coffee, before they hit the ground running; And because of their fast-paced schedule, they mostly survive on fast food and energy drinks. The truth however, is that it takes a healthy medical student to become a healthy medical doctor, and a balanced diet not only increases your physical stamina, it also enhances your mental capacity.

You can read: 6 TIPS FOR EATING HEALTHY ON A MED STUDENT BUDGET

19. Focus on becoming competent rather than just getting good grades. 

While good grades are important for you to graduate from medical school, you need more than good grades to become a competent doctor. So don’t be depressed because your grades are not so impressive, just keep working hard to become the doctor of your dreams.


20. Listen to podcasts.

Whether you’re interested in purely medical podcasts like EM Basic or you prefer a wider variety of topics such as TEDTalks, listening to podcasts is a good way to keep your motivation coming.

I hope these tips are helpful.

Cheers,

:::requ1ne:::

❤️❤️❤️

50 Practical Ways To Stay Motivated In Medical School (Part 1)

All medical students need encouragement from time to time; And staying motivated through the rigors of medical school is in itself a challenge.

From my experience and those of other past and present medical students, here are some practical ways to keep the motivation coming through medical school, which I’ll be sharing over the next few weeks.

1. Discover yourself.

As a medical student, you’ve likely spent most of your life in a school environment (Elementary to College); now is the time to not just focus on your schoolwork alone, but also learn about yourself- your purpose, your values and your principles. You’ll be surprised at what you’ll find out.

2. Learn new skills

Medical school opens a world of other interests to you, where you can develop new skills like writing, photography, baking, video editing, or music; plus the Internet offers you great DIY resources.

3. Take online courses.

It is true that you’ve chosen the career path of medicine, but there’s so much you can learn about other fields like the arts, humanities, social sciences or technology. There are a variety of free courses online that you can look into.

Try some courses for free here: Edx.org

4. Avoid negative self-talk.

There’s enough stress to handle already with the overwhelming work load in medical school and sometimes discouraging grades. It gets worse with putting extra pressure on yourself and criticizing every mistake you make.

5. Volunteer.

Volunteering especially for medical causes (health fairs, blood drives, health awareness campaigns etc) is a good way to feel invaluable while giving back to your community. You don’t have to wait until you graduate before you find some meaning in the medical path.

6. Listen to good music.

Good music is like therapy for your soul. You’ll have some low output days, and rather than allow yourself to sink into depression, why not listen to some cool beats with amazing lyrics? Music is a great tool for internal motivation.

Listen to this inspiring song: I’m a Winner(MTN Project Fame version)

7. Watch Medical Shows.

Medical shows are not only a (fairly good) source of medical information (think terminologies, procedures and diagnosis) and humor, they also fuel your passion for medicine. Grey’s Anatomy, House and Chicago med are a few of them.

8. Start your own business.

Even as a medical student you can become an entrepreneur; apart from the financial renumeration, it also gives you a sense of self-worth and personal satisfaction.

Cake by ADESUWA (A 3rd year medical student)

9. Keep a journal.

Having a journal helps to boost your morale when you reflect on how you overcame a previously challenging time; it also helps you to keep an account of your journey which will be relevant in sharing your experiences in future.

Read: Chronicles of a Student-Doctor (A medical school journal)

10. Keep the end in mind

 “For me it was mostly the thought of being a good doctor (that kept me motivated) says Dr. Johnson, “I was always like someone’s life is going to be in my hands one day and I sure want to be able to save…I don’t want to be the doctor that doesn’t know what she’s doing.”


I hope you find some of the tips helpful, you can let me know some other ways you stay(ed) motivated in medical school.

Cheers,

:::requ1ne:::

❤️❤️❤️

PS– If you enjoyed this post, you might also enjoy:

– 7 Strategies for studying in medical school

– 5 Tips to reduce stress in medical school

– 7 Lessons from medical school